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Lumber Size Lawsuit, Now I've heard of everything...


chadd

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Saw this article in the newspaper.  Unbelievable; I'm all for going back to nominal dimension lumber, but to sue stores for something that is common knowledge... I'm sorry but anyone who doesn't know that the lumber designation is a nominal size and that with modern lumber the actual size is smaller, should not be allowed to use power tools, let alone build a structure...  It would be one thing if these stores were specifically telling manufacturers to make their wood smaller than the industry standard tolerance and someone had a structural failure due to it, but that doesn't seem to be what is going on here...  I swear every time you try to make something foolproof, our society somehow manages to find a way to make a better fool... 

JS Online, Menards/Home Depot Lawsuit

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SON has been making storage cabinets, one for their house and one for a coworker.  He's using 3/4 inch Oak plywood and has to cut tight fitting dad's for the partitions.  He's finding each sheet is different thickness and as much as .025" to .045" too thin.  I'm sure there is a tolerance but you think they would be more consistent!

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2 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

SON has been making storage cabinets, one for their house and one for a coworker.  He's using 3/4 inch Oak plywood and has to cut tight fitting dad's for the partitions.  He's finding each sheet is different thickness and as much as .025" to .045" too thin.  I'm sure there is a tolerance but you think they would be more consistent!

they do make router bits specifically for undersized plywood

just google undersized plywood dado bits

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31 minutes ago, Takn4aFool said:

they do make router bits specifically for undersized plywood

just google undersized plywood dado bits

I think SON is using a Dado cutter in his table saw,  think it's adjustable to .005 inch.  He just has to make sure the right piece gets in the right slots.

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More proof the end times are near.......

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Can we all say......'ambulance chaser'?    Somebody hoping for a quick couple bucks out of court. I hope HD and Menards combine forces and squeeze the crap out of them. The gene pool is getting a bit over crowded.  What a waste of time and effort. 

If my history is half way correct, I think lumber has been less than 2x4 since the late 1800's/early 1900's. Yes, a rough cut 2x4 is 2x4. But take into consideration drying and milling, now you are down to under 2x4. The 50's or 60's I think is when there finally became a 'standard'. Lumber straight from the mill will usually be full size. To get a milled 2x4 would require probably a 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 rough cut.  Structurally a 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 is strong enough. If not, they would have never changed it.

As for the plywood, construction plywood (CDX etc.) are all stamped with the actual thickness. I've built a lot of cabinets, and yes, an undersize router bit is my preference though I admit once in a while I'll get one that is snugger than normal. But since you are dealing with a natural rather than man made material  there is bound to be some variance however slight. 

 

 

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That lawsuit is total bull crap. Here in Canada that lawsuit would be thrown out in a second. Anyone who doesn't know that a planed 2x4 is actually 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches shouldn't be allowed to own any wood working tools. It has been that way since planning of wood was started somewhere in the 1800's. In fact this is made plenty clear in the handbook on timber construction in the section on sizes of lumber available. If these jokers win this lawsuit then I will know for sure that America is done like dinner and is ready for a Putin takeover. What ever it takes this frivolous lawsuit needs to be put down and the plaintiffs charged 10 times the court costs as a deterrent to future frivolous lawsuits. 

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I guess our rough cut lumber should be worth more then planed then cause there's more wood there :lol: It's scarey what the world is coming to.:( Sad part is if they sold them all rough lumber someone would probably try and sue because they got a wood splinter in their precious little hand.

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16 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

SON has been making storage cabinets, one for their house and one for a coworker.  He's using 3/4 inch Oak plywood and has to cut tight fitting dad's for the partitions.  He's finding each sheet is different thickness and as much as .025" to .045" too thin.  I'm sure there is a tolerance but you think they would be more consistent!

I worked at an International Paper sawmill/plywood mill for a year back about 15 years ago and ran a plywood press. They of course have tolerances since just like finished boards have a smaller finished dimension after planing the plywood there is a variance and also with the steam presses that bond the wood and cure the glue, if the heat is just a couple degrees off and stays just a few seconds too long there can be a large variance. I realize with high grade oak one would expect it to be exact but the usual allowed tolerance that I can remember for higher grade stuff was 1/32 which I believe is .03 and on run of the mill (no pun intended) B/C or C/D decking 1/16 was standard which I think is 06. I don/t know about the weather in your area but humidity will create alot of swelling or even thinning from low humidity from drying out since when the plywood is final measured at the mill it still hasn't finished drying out and has a high moisture content even after the wood veneers have went thru the dryers.

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If wood is anything like metal, they prefer to produce it at the minimum size allowed by the published standard.   Every little bit adds up and saves a little more and that effects the bottom line

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It's one thing for some dumb A$$ to not know this, and complain. The real problem here though is some snake lawyer thinking they could sue and win on this type of thing. That is the first problem, even taking a case like that. Very Stupid!

ok, so say plaintiff wins, and becomes a millionaire because of this type of frivolous BS. So a few get rich off the companies, and their insurance. So, now we all have to pay higher insurance, and the companies will be forced to raise their selling prices. So, a few become wealthy at the expense of everyone else! This $h!t is what is terribly wrong  with our country! I like the Canadian's way, laugh it out of the court house. How much time and money is wasted every single day in our country over frivolous lawsuits!

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21 hours ago, dads706 said:

Can we all say......'ambulance chaser'?    Somebody hoping for a quick couple bucks out of court. I hope HD and Menards combine forces and squeeze the crap out of them. The gene pool is getting a bit over crowded.  What a waste of time and effort. 

If my history is half way correct, I think lumber has been less than 2x4 since the late 1800's/early 1900's. Yes, a rough cut 2x4 is 2x4. But take into consideration drying and milling, now you are down to under 2x4. The 50's or 60's I think is when there finally became a 'standard'. Lumber straight from the mill will usually be full size. To get a milled 2x4 would require probably a 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 rough cut.  Structurally a 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 is strong enough. If not, they would have never changed it.

As for the plywood, construction plywood (CDX etc.) are all stamped with the actual thickness. I've built a lot of cabinets, and yes, an undersize router bit is my preference though I admit once in a while I'll get one that is snugger than normal. But since you are dealing with a natural rather than man made material  there is bound to be some variance however slight. 

 

 

AMEN!   New meaning for the term Ambulance Chaser.

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