Jump to content

Making Loose Hay


U-C

Recommended Posts

Does anyone still make loose hay in North America? And what kind of equipment did you use and stored the hay?

We made loose hay in Switzerland and stored it in the Barn's hayloft. We used a self loading wagon (looks similar to the Poettinger) to get the hay in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are a few over toward Helena Montana that do, even maybe horses hopefully Gary (old binder guy) will chime in I'd bet has got pictures too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have an IH hay loader ,don't use it. Nice conversation piece . Taking it to a local show if I can figure out how to load it . Amish want it but they want me to give it to them because . 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Uncle George talked about doing it they made with a sickle bar and a front end loader on the m . They had a big huge wooden bucket it ,it was like slats that would make it slightly flexible . They would drive over the ground sideways or the opposite way it was mowed and it would pick most of it up and then they would dump it in the barn with that. 

Text to speech sorry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a video link of the haying equipment used in Switzerland;

in the video a Huerlimann Tractor and a Bucher selfloading wagon and hay blower!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

grandpa put up hay loose until the late 80's (or maybe the early 90's) when retired,  he cut and windowed it no different than if he was going to bale it, then chopped it dry into the boxes just like if he was doing silage but with less knives on the chopper, then he blew it into the barn just like a silo (pipe and all). 

Great grandpa bought the farm long before tractors and he only had one daughter so he never got into bales, went from using ropes and horses to pull it up into the mow to chopping and blowing it, in fact i don't know if there has ever been a bale done on the home farm, if it has it was by a renter

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boy you guys missed all the fun. An H or M or jd 2 cyl on a farmhand and pushed windrows together with a hay basket. A big bucket with wooden teeth. 10 ft wide with 8 or 9 ft teeth. Push the hay up in windrows then carry it to stack and make a 10by 20 ft stack 12 ft tall. About 6 tons of prairie hay in a stack. They made stack frames to act like a cage to form stack and you opened doors when full  and pulled frame from stack to new location. We used to stack loose hay with a jd bread loave machine. It had a flai pickup and blew hay into a body you presses it 10 or 12 times with hydraulic and unloaded stack out the back. They made 2 to 3 ton stacks you set 3 together and could load onto a chain hay mover. We used to take the m and top of the three bread loaves with more hay making it look like a hay stack. The last we stacked was in the early 80s and the one hired man who was old then could stack without the hay frame made a near perfect stack just with loader. In the old days before movers you went out pitched hay rack or truck full and took it to barn and pulled it up it rope and grapple. Or restocked by hand next to barn. Then they invented cable loading movers and in the mid 60s live bed chain movers. Hay buster made a stacker that made round stacks elevated hay with chains up to top where a press arm filled the rotating stacker . Then you drove home and unloaded it.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty modern, U-C.  I will try to give you some loose hay memories. 

Dad was a part time farmer so we only did about six or seven acres of hay.  Had two milk cows to feed.  Brownie was a Guernsey and Nellie was a Holstein. Dad bought the farm only about 5 years earlier and didn't have much for equipment.  WW 11 was going on so new things made from steel weren't available even if someone had the money to buy.  All available steel was going to the war effort.  What we did have was a good old Farmall Regular for the tractor.  The mower was an Oliver (red with yellow wheels), converted from horse drawn with a five foot sickle bar.  Don't laugh guys.  It worked good but took a lot of rounds to get the job done.  Someone had to ride the seat on the mower to push down the lever and raise the sickle on turns or when crossing hay already cut so it would not clog up.  The rake was an old converted horse drawn , high wheel dump rake.  the trick with that was to dump each time in line with the dump from the last round  to somewhat form a wind row as progress was made across the field. I liked riding the rake when I got lld enough.  Step on one pedal to raise the rack, and the other one to push it back down. The wagon was decent.   It had an over the wheels flat deck  that Dad had built..  The running gear was the undercarriage from a 1932 ford coupe.  Hay racks front and rear.  Other equipment was two pitch forks and four human bodies.  

 

After the cut hay dried in the sun for a couple of days, it was raked into windrows.  After more drying the windrows were forked into shocks all over the field.  Then the tractor and wagon.  IIRC, the procedure was that my older brother drove the Farmall and Dad loaded the shocks onto the wagon by pitch fork.  Mom and I were packers.  I had to stay with Mom because I was too young to run loose.  We had to walk front to back and back to front on the wagon to keep drawing the load in.  Not  bad at first but as the hay got deeper the walking got harder.  Much like walking in deep snow w/o snow shoes.    By the time the load was four feet deep, I can remember being  darn glad to lay down in the load and ride to the barn.  Once there Dad pitched the hay through a large window type opening with a swinging door, into the loft of the barn.  That was not rest time as we had to move hay to the back and walk on it there to pack it.

All in all we were a little ahead of Cyrus Mc Cormick, but not a lot.

 

Charlie

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a aerial picture of the farm from the mid 50s showing the bread loaves sitting next to the barn made by our Farmall M and Farmhand stacker..  The picture also shows the M hooked to the Massey Harris rake and the WD9 hooked to some unknown square baler.  There are also a few stacks of square bales in the barnyard.  So it looks to me like we transitioned from loose hay to bales during the 50s.  As far as how the loose hay was put I don't know because nobody is left anymore that would know. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, Art From DeLeon said:

The last time I was out in the Nebraska Sandhills, maybe 3 or 4 years ago, you would still see stacks of loose hay.

Can't find the pictures, but I doubt if much has changed.

 

Rowse (Another good Nebraska company) is still making dump rakes.

http://www.rowserakes.com/equipment/rakes/dump-rake.html

Everyone had a rowse dump rake up here . Sizes from 24 to 42 ft. If the guy running the rake was good a fast way to put up hay. The only problem you had to re rake the field after first pass of windrows were stacked or baled. You dumped your rake on hay that wasn't raked and it would leave streaks all over hayfield.  We pulled our rake with an A jd then a super m , sometimes dad would use one of his 4 wds so they had air conditioning. If you had enough people to run two rakes you could cover a lot of hay land fast.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, AKwelder said:

grandpa put up hay loose until the late 80's (or maybe the early 90's) when retired,  he cut and windowed it no different than if he was going to bale it, then chopped it dry into the boxes just like if he was doing silage but with less knives on the chopper, then he blew it into the barn just like a silo (pipe and all). 

Great grandpa bought the farm long before tractors and he only had one daughter so he never got into bales, went from using ropes and horses to pull it up into the mow to chopping and blowing it, in fact i don't know if there has ever been a bale done on the home farm, if it has it was by a renter

Neighbor used to chop hay and blow it into his haymow of his barn.  Seems like he had a concrete stave silo too.  Lot less work than baling small square bales.  

One day about 1966-'67 Dad and I are coming home from a parts run.  Two local fire trucks are driving away from town and not in a hurry, so we follow them.   They set up the pumper truck with as many hoses as they had,  set up a portable canvas water tank to draw water from,  water trucks coming from all the local small towns, even water wagons from neighboring farms, yard was FULL of people,  couple photographers from the small weekly papers,  they dug into the silage that was chopped just a bit too wet and was burning/smoldering inside.

Neighbor across the road from our home farm had a converted corn crib full of too wet shell corn get hot too.  Same deal,  all the local fire trucks and neighbors showed up to dig the smoldering corn out.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lucien Paquette, the narrator of that video, is still alive. He celebrated his 100th birthday last summer. He is responsible for most of the good parts of our local fair. Until just a few years ago would still participate in the hand mowing contest and usually win! An amazing man, wish more like him around.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

U-C, interesting system in the video you posted.  In 2010, when my bride and I where returning from our honeymoon, we saw stacks of loose hay, out in the field in Nebraska.  Would have been NE Nebraska, not so far SW of Yankton.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all, for the interesting info (stories, videos, and pics) and keep them coming. I think it is important to remember and to keep loose hay making alive. A small company in Switzerland still makes Buckrakes (the company is called Faessler Landtechnik) On youtube someone posted a video of a three point hitch buckrake:

And here is a video of Alpine Farmer bringing in the hay with machinery:

 

Faessler Buckrake.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, U-C said:

Thank you all, for the interesting info (stories, videos, and pics) and keep them coming. I think it is important to remember and to keep loose hay making alive. A small company in Switzerland still makes Buckrakes (the company is called Faessler Landtechnik) On youtube someone posted a video of a three point hitch buckrake:

And here is a video of Alpine Farmer bringing in the hay with machinery:

 

Faessler Buckrake.jpg

That is what the hay basket for the loader was made like but 2 times as big. In the back if you were modern they had a hay push off to clear the bucket of hay. Pushed it forwards off the teeth onto top of stack. When I have time I have to get my photobucket account going again and find some pictures.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Jayhawk stacker was developed at Hoxie, Kansas; production was later moved to Salina. 

There several in our neighborhood near Oberlin, KS but I never saw one in use.

 

The Kansas Historical Society museum has a patent model in its collection.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My uncles did loose hay into the '50s. Cut with a sickle bar on a Jubilee Ford, Tedded by hand, raked with a horse drawn dump rake, pitched by hand into a wagon, pitched up to loft, then up to next loft. Wow! I'm glad I was too young to help! By the time I started to help we were raking with a side delivery and baling with a pony engine baler. I'd load bales until my pipe-stem arms gave out, stack until they really gave out, then drive the '48 Brockway. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dad put up loose hay and square bales all the way through the early 90s. First cutting got stacked and the rest got square baled. Hay sweep on the front of an f10 or f25 farmhand. Those stacks seemed monstrous as a kid. Still use the f25 to stack hay, although now it has a grapple bucket on it rather than a hay sweep. 

In this picture it has the scoop sides on for loading ear corn.

20160212_171808_zpsnz89pvwn.jpg

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I grew up with loose hay. It was all done with horses before I came along. It was mowed with Farmalls and mowers in my lifetime.

AlvinCharlesBillJuly1950.jpg.905825e63416f1c01e2c7925e9229553.jpg

Early on, we used dump rakes. We then went to side delivery rakes. We had one or two motorized buckrakes or "bullrakes" as they were known on our place.

5908a903545a6_Bullrakebuildingsatfarm.thumb.jpg.cad7b8faccdb6704333c6cb63ee3630f.jpg

Originally they used a farmhand loader on a Farmall. They realized they needed to build the F-10 Farmhand loader onto reversed trucks. It speeded up the operation and cut the time in half.

F_10_Farmhand_on_KB_5_IH_Truck2.jpg.17b06aada195a49f2f1c87053f027448.jpg

In winter I'd chain up the dual wheels, put the grapple fork head and feed off of the stack with it. We'd winter the cows in the field of the haystack. 

We never had a swather in my time. That would have been the cat's meow too.

While I worked for Bourke Motor & Implement Company in 1974 & 75, we also sold a Hesston "bread loaf" system that was quite expensive, but I did sell a set to a large cattle operation near there.

John Hanson, thanks for explaining the "beaverslide" stackers. They are still used in the Avon area, here near Helena.

Gary or OBG;)
PS: U-C what part of Switzerland are you from? My grandmother was from Andermatt.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/2/2017 at 10:56 AM, Old Binder Guy said:

I grew up with loose hay. It was all done with horses before I came along. It was mowed with Farmalls and mowers in my lifetime.

AlvinCharlesBillJuly1950.jpg.905825e63416f1c01e2c7925e9229553.jpg

Early on, we used dump rakes. We then went to side delivery rakes. We had one or two motorized buckrakes or "bullrakes" as they were known on our place.

5908a903545a6_Bullrakebuildingsatfarm.thumb.jpg.cad7b8faccdb6704333c6cb63ee3630f.jpg

Originally they used a farmhand loader on a Farmall. They realized they needed to build the F-10 Farmhand loader onto reversed trucks. It speeded up the operation and cut the time in half.

F_10_Farmhand_on_KB_5_IH_Truck2.jpg.17b06aada195a49f2f1c87053f027448.jpg

In winter I'd chain up the dual wheels, put the grapple fork head and feed off of the stack with it. We'd winter the cows in the field of the haystack. 

We never had a swather in my time. That would have been the cat's meow too.

While I worked for Bourke Motor & Implement Company in 1974 & 75, we also sold a Hesston "bread loaf" system that was quite expensive, but I did sell a set to a large cattle operation near there.

John Hanson, thanks for explaining the "beaverslide" stackers. They are still used in the Avon area, here near Helena.

Gary or OBG;)
PS: U-C what part of Switzerland are you from? My grandmother was from Andermatt.

Hi Gary

I am from the Northeastern part of Switzerland (Canton Thurgau). There we had a Tenant Farm near the Castle Altenklingen. And then in 1997 we moved to Canada.

Originally on my fathers side of the family, we are from the town Seeberg, canton of Bern (Andermatt is located in the canton Uri). For does who do not know what a Canton is that is like a State in the US.

-Urs

PS: When did your Grandmother move to the US?

And here is a video I found on youtube, that takes place in the Emmental Valley Switzerland in the 50's (close to the end of the film there is also a Hay Harvesting scene).

 

Edited by U-C
I made a mistake on the location of Andermatt
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...