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Drewu223

Need Loadstar Info

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Ok so back home we have an old IH Loadstar that has been sitting there since before I was born (I'm 18) and I am wanting to know more about it and possibly restore it. I'm out of state so I can't go look and get more info, but I do know it is a tandem axle, manual transmission, and I belive has the 6v53. Dad's not positive on the engine, he just says it's a detroit which I guess narrows it down to the 6v53. Can anyone give me some tips and advice for restoring the old beast when I graduate? I'll be using it to pull my 966 and possibly Super M to some local tractor pulls

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2 hours ago, lightninboy said:

Just buy a gooseneck flatbed and you'd be a lot better off.

I have a 25 foot one that I pull with my 98 K2500, but I want to be able to pull both at once. And I also think it would be cool to have an IH truck pulling IH tractors 

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That would be cool and I wish you luck  

I have a 1972 Loadstar 1850 with a transplanted DT 466 that we bought new. I have been looking for pieces I will need to fix some issues with rust and wear on cab. Haven't found any good sources yet. 

Keep us posted on progress 

 

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9 hours ago, lightninboy said:

You gotta see what it needs. You seen the one in the movie Independence Day?

No I have not, I looked It up and found out that movie is older than me haha

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22 hours ago, 65806 said:

That would be cool and I wish you luck  

I have a 1972 Loadstar 1850 with a transplanted DT 466 that we bought new. I have been looking for pieces I will need to fix some issues with rust and wear on cab. Haven't found any good sources yet. 

Keep us posted on progress 

 

I know this one needs a seat and a new back glass, can't remember what else 

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at least if its got a Detroit  it will have air brakes that will make getting it roadworthy a LOT easier. But it will be a money pit.

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Does it have air brakes or a vacuum pump like our old 1850 550 diesel had?

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On 2/18/2017 at 3:19 PM, Drewu223 said:

I know this one needs a seat and a new back glass, can't remember what else 

Some cab parts are the same as used on IH pickups also so that might be another source in junk yards. 

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Cab is the same as a C series pickup, if there are any issues with the Detroit, just swap a DT 466 into it, can pick up a running 466 for as low as $1200. 

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11 hours ago, TheIHMan said:

Cab is the same as a C series pickup

My Loadstar and 1200 A cabs are different. There is more space between the top of the windshield and roofline on the Loadstar. Other than that everything will interchange. It does use the same windshield.

Dennis

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Tunning a Detroit is a fine art...If it's original and you want to restore it the Detroit would be a cool idea.  A 466 is a great engine but it would not be the same.  Best advice for the Detroit is get ear plugs and keep your foot down on the pedal!  Oh, and they all leak oil so the under Neath won't be rotten.

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Well I finally got home from college and had time to go look at it, and it is actually a 1967 fleetstar 2000D with the 6-71 detroit diesel. Interior is pretty well shot but the rest of the truck seems to be in decent shape. Should have got pictures whileI was there but oh well haha 

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6-71 is a good engine some of the newer ones were turbo charged to give them a little more power

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Anything less than an 8V-71 is underpowered for serious trucking, but if you're just hauling light loads, you might get by.

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We ran a 5000 paystar 6*6 to spread poop... It had a 6 71 turbo, it did ok just your foot got tired.  Definitely doesn't compare to a Cummins

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Them 6-71's were decent engines. You just get sick of listening to them after a long day. A good 350-400 cummins is waaay better. IMHO. But if your just wanting to restore it and that's what it's got than it will be fine. 

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6-71 was also called a "238", as in horsepower.  An 8V-71 was called a " 318".  Not all versions of those engines made those HP numbers however.

Driving a Detroit is a lot like driving a gas engine in a truck,  you have to drive it "Flat-Footed",  foot off the gas pedal or the gas pedal flat on the floor and hold it there till it reaches governed rpm.  You can feel and hear them reach full rpm and the governor pull fuel away from them.  Gear changes happen fast in the lower gears, like the lo range of a Road-Ranger,  higher gears you have to be patient and wait.  Short shifting and skipping gears like you can do with big Cummins or Cat or 4-stroke Detroit's does not work.

   A DT-466 would make a nice replacement for a 6-71.

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The DT466 will never make a replacement engine for a 6-71 Detroit.  The 6-71 is a commercial industrial engine the DT466 is a light duty / medium duty truck  engine.  In international medium duties the 466 was a replacement for the 266-392 gas engines.

The old 6-71 will be running after the light duty engine 466 IH is long gone to the scrap yard when used in a commercial application.

AND in marine and other operations the 6-71 in a turbo charged intercooled configuration was rated at 485 continuous horsepower. AND sold until 1999 when  they could not be made to pass the EPA's then current smog test. Neither did many other old industrial engines made the cut either.  Including the 3406 cat engine, many  Cummins models and engines made by BUDA and others.

Therefore the 6-71 is a heavy duty commercial engine that was sold new  from the 40's until 1999. Repair parts are still available,  if you have one that is still together you certainly have an engine worthy of  its proper place in industrial  drive train history.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, oleman said:

The DT466 will never make a replacement engine for a 6-71 Detroit.  The 6-71 is a commercial industrial engine the DT466 is a light duty / medium duty truck  engine.  In international medium duties the 466 was a replacement for the 266-392 gas engines.

The old 6-71 will be running after the light duty engine 466 IH is long gone to the scrap yard when used in a commercial application.

AND in marine and other operations the 6-71 in a turbo charged intercooled configuration was rated at 485 continuous horsepower. AND sold until 1999 when  they could not be made to pass the EPA's then current smog test. Neither did many other old industrial engines made the cut either.  Including the 3406 cat engine, many  Cummins models and engines made by BUDA and others.

Therefore the 6-71 is a heavy duty commercial engine that was sold new  from the 40's until 1999. Repair parts are still available,  if you have one that is still together you certainly have an engine worthy of  its proper place in industrial  drive train history.

 

 

 

I think you are REALLY selling the DT-466 short.  Mr. Goodwrench,  shop manager at the company I drove for told me about a regional east coast trucking company that used DT-466 powered tandem tractors instead of V-6 Detroit's like 6V-92TTA's,  6-71's, 290 Cummins, etc.  They used 13 speed RoadRangers and the drivers were O-K with the performance and average fuel economy was almost double what they got before the switch to the DT-466.  Engine life was 200,000-250,000 miles and a complete new or rebuilt engine would be installed in A DAY.  That trucking company was written up in the IH truck dealer's monthly news magazine.  Mr. GoodWrench had been Shop Service Mgr at Riverside IH Trucks on West River Drive in Davenport, Iowa. before coming to work managing our shop.

Really, the DT-466 replaced the V-266?  That was an early Scout & half ton pickup engine only wasn't it?  And discontinued in the 1970's?  I remember reading here I think it was International discontinued all specific 266 engine parts not shared with 304/345 engines,  bet that was ten years ago.

The 6-71's do deserve a place in truck history,  in a museum with a pile of oil dry under it.  The guys that kept them running back in the 1960's and 1970's are all gone now.

I have to laugh at these Military and Marine ratings.  Yes, an unlimited supply of cold water makes overheating almost impossible,  but doubling HP doubles stress.  I'd hate to have my life depend on a 485 HP 6-71!  The tired old specimens I've driven barely got me home making +/-200 HP!

If you don't like the DT-466 there's always the DT-530 & 570 by whatever Max-Force name International calls them now.  I could see someone bad mouthing the T444E, the 7.3 L V-8, or the 6.0L and 6.4L,  but saying those things about the DT-466 is like saying the LT-1 350 Chevy engine was junk!  I remember the day the Traffic Manager at IH Melrose Park suggested we put Detroit engines in Farmall tractors.  Oliver tried that with little success.

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17 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Really, the DT-466 replaced the V-266?  That was an early Scout & half ton pickup engine only wasn't it?  And discontinued in the 1970's?  I remember reading here I think it was International discontinued all specific 266 engine parts not shared with 304/345 engines,  bet that was ten years ago.

 

The 266 was used in medium-duty trucks. It was one of IH's highest-revving engines and truck drivers revved it up to get power out of it.

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1 hour ago, lightninboy said:

The 266 was used in medium-duty trucks. It was one of IH's highest-revving engines and truck drivers revved it up to get power out of it.

I don't know what it was all installed in but I have a 266 in my '59 pickup and it's fine for that but would be a gutless choice in anything bigger. IMO. 

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In 1963 a construction company my Dad worked as a driver for bought several new IH 1800 10 wheeler dumps with a 10-12 yd bed powered by a V304 and many gears.

Most of the speed limits in South Carolina at that time were 55 MPG, and the ground is mostly flat and at sea level.  He never complained about his new truck.

These 1800's replaced F750 Fords and 3400 Chevies, none were tandem, The V304 with correct gearing was more than a match for the old 59 Fords and Chevies.

Later on they moved to 6-71 powered end dumps, Do not recall the IH tractor model.  The owners liked IH because in their opinion they were proven workhorses after  the little 304 demonstrated it's stuff over several years.

 

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