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Vintage pictures


ChrisNY

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One of my favorite topics here is when people post old photos of years past and seeing peoples equipment and memories and hearing the stories. Now that winter is here and we have more time I thought it would be great to start a topic, much like the vintage ads topic which is now well over 200 pages, where people can share photos of days gone by. Join in and share, there has been some great photos here over the years.

I will start it off with a late 70's picture of our old 4366 pulling 24' Sunflower disk(sorry its blurry, was not great cameras back then)

0226121448.jpg

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47 minutes ago, ChrisNY said:

(sorry its blurry, was not great cameras back then)

0226121448.jpg

Chris you don't have to apologize we understand that you were moving to fast to get a good picture. If you take a picture of a John Deere in the field it is going slower and the picture wouldn't be blurry 

;);)

Any IH picture is good

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This should be interesting. Although for me, late seventies is just like yesterday. :-)

I like this one of my Uncle Roy standing beside their Farmall M back in the mid to late 1950s. Got the winter front on the grille to try and keep the temp up to normal. I wish they had kept the old M but it was traded off on the John Deere AR some time in the 60s. 

Roy Farmall.jpg

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That 1566 is sweet!

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I have shared this picture before but here it is again. My Great Grandfather picking corn with the 350 he purchased new in 57'. Picture is from the mid 60's. 

GBUNT00_zpspjsbxp5s.jpg

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Old Pic is our 1942 All Fuel H in 1958 with my Dad and Pappa hooked to the corn picker, I took a pic of the tractor this Summer in the same spot.

silo.png

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Dad breaking in his new 766 pulling a 4-16 710 in sod, with me following on his 2520 with 3-16 mounted Deere plow. Oct. '73.

PICT0075 (800x533).jpg

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imagejpg2_zps3ce69dff.jpg

a uncle, dad and grandfather with their brand new shinny 1466.

 

imagejpg1_zps8b38e43a.jpg

in this one I am the little shaver on the weights. The other tractor is a 1972 1066 they bought new.  

  I always thought this was the fall of 75.  In a recent discussion with dad he thinks the 14 didnt go to the field untill the spring of 76.  It was the first blackstripe tractor in the area.

  bill

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9 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Uncle Roy standing beside their Farmall M back in the mid to late 1950s

I see the crank there.  Battery dead?

best, randy

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1 hour ago, Randy Sohn said:

I see the crank there.  Battery dead?

best, randy

That photo would have been around the date when electricity first came to the area so up to that point, no block heaters or battery chargers. If the battery couldn't handle it, the crank was the last hope. Unless they still had a team of horses around to give the tractor a pull start. 

Aunt Gladys and dog.jpg

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Great pictures, lets keep this thread going

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14 hours ago, Loadstar said:

photo would have been around the date when electricity first came to the area so up to that point, no block heaters or battery chargers. If the battery couldn't handle it, the crank was the last hope. Unless they still had a team of horses

A 6 volt batttery.  Down at the coffee shop this morning we were talking about those days (we got electicity {REA} on the farm in 1945).  We wondered if anyone on here remembers or knew about the gloves with TWO thumbs so they could be reversed if one side wore out?  Or the "corn shucker hook" for picking earcorn by hand?  Or what a "bang-board" on the wagon was?  Or how the team of horses knew to move ahead only so many paces and then stop again while picking corn?

best, randy

 

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7 hours ago, Randy Sohn said:

A 6 volt batttery.  Down at the coffee shop this morning we were talking about those days (we got electicity {REA} on the farm in 1945).  We wondered if anyone on here remembers or knew about the gloves with TWO thumbs so they could be reversed if one side wore out?  Or the "corn shucker hook" for picking earcorn by hand?  Or what a "bang-board" on the wagon was?  Or how the team of horses knew to move ahead only so many paces and then stop again while picking corn?

best, randy

 

Never heard of the two thumbed gloves but it sounds like a great idea. Its hard to get a year out of a pair of gloves I find. 

Heres a vintage 1976 harvest scene with my dad on the 730 Case and hitched to the 460 Case combine. Lots of straw that year. That was a 15 foot swath. 

730 and 460 76 small.jpg

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On 12/11/2016 at 8:49 PM, billonthefarm said:

imagejpg2_zps3ce69dff.jpg

a uncle, dad and grandfather with their brand new shinny 1466.

 

imagejpg1_zps8b38e43a.jpg

in this one I am the little shaver on the weights. The other tractor is a 1972 1066 they bought new.  

  I always thought this was the fall of 75.  In a recent discussion with dad he thinks the 14 didnt go to the field untill the spring of 76.  It was the first blackstripe tractor in the area.

  bill

Bill what kind of cab does the tractor in the left have?

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12 hours ago, Randy Sohn said:

A 6 volt batttery.  Down at the coffee shop this morning we were talking about those days (we got electicity {REA} on the farm in 1945).  We wondered if anyone on here remembers or knew about the gloves with TWO thumbs so they could be reversed if one side wore out?  Or the "corn shucker hook" for picking earcorn by hand?  Or what a "bang-board" on the wagon was?  Or how the team of horses knew to move ahead only so many paces and then stop again while picking corn?

best, randy

 

Absolutely!  The two thumb gloves were the only ones we had.  Also had two thumb mittens.  They wore out fast picking corn.  Lasted almost twice as long when you could turn them over.  I also used the corn hook, but never the "peg" style.

I was just too young for the horse operation, and for that matter, much hand corn picking, although I did do some.  We had a small field in the hills that got snowed in one year and were not able to get a tractor and corn picker in there.  That got picked by hand and my step mother did a little duty pulling the wagon ahead just the right amount at a time not very successfully.  Which worked out quite well for me as I was assigned to the tractor and no longer had to pick the ears and throw them into the wagon.  Using the bang board, of course.  Each one of the wagon loads were parked in the hog lot and the corn was fed out of the wagon using the scoop board.  Don't forget that, Randy.

Ron

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This is from the around 1972, that is a very young me in the seat. Back before Thundercreek fuel trailers:lol:. The barge wagon had gasoline tank and small trailer had diesel fuel, oil grease and tools. Back then one 815 was a gasser one was Diesel

 

fuel wagons.png

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5 hours ago, Ron Cook said:

corn was fed out of the wagon using the scoop board.  Don't forget that, Randy.

Oh-boy, I did forget that!  Jim, down at the Caribou coffeeshop, and I have some interesting discussions about our former lives, his memories of the NE Iowa scene and mine of the NW Iowa stuff, gonna tell him about this.

best, randy

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Another shade of red here. I'm running the Massey 510 back in 1983 picking up an 18 foot swath of durum wheat. That is the Massey 655 swather in the background. Colours turned out great on this one and I had it enlarged to hang on the wall. That was a good old 510 that never gave much trouble.

 

510 MF 83.jpg

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On 12/11/2016 at 11:51 AM, Loadstar said:

This should be interesting. Although for me, late seventies is just like yesterday. :-)

I like this one of my Uncle Roy standing beside their Farmall M back in the mid to late 1950s. Got the winter front on the grille to try and keep the temp up to normal. I wish they had kept the old M but it was traded off on the John Deere AR some time in the 60s. 

Roy Farmall.jpg

Going from an M to an AR is a really Huge step down don't you think?  Would have been like my Dad trading my Stage II Super H for the '40 styled JD B he bought a year later.  The B had one purpose on the farm, pull the JD R spreader thru the hog house.  The driveway was only 67-68 inches wide.  No starter, lights, hydraulics, on the B.  

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