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texgyrene

Tired 1964 282 cu.in. diesel needs replacing

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 My 1964 Farmall 706 with a 282 cu.in. diesel laid down on me. What diesel  made by IH would be an easy swap out ? I can't use a turbo because the loader is in the way. If at all possible, I would like to have the swap be a bolt up affair so I can retain the new clutch and throwout bearing. I live in the weeds in central Texas . It's difficult to find people here that have the info I need to make the swap. I have heard that a 360 out of a bus would work.  I would appreciate any info anyone can pass along. Thanks!

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Rebuilding will be the easiest and most likely the cheapest alternative 

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bolt up affair d282 d236 or d301 next best c263 c221 or c301 every thing else major work

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Bitty and R190- Thank you very much for your replies to my query. I really appreciate it. If anyone else would like to chime in on this please do so. That 706 is solid in all other areas and I hate to part with it and really can't because it has been in the family so long. Early on, I found a sign that said," If It ain't Red, keep it in the shed."  I abide by those words. That 706 is one tough tractor when it's running right. Again, thanks for your prompt replies!

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My 706D has the very reliable IH German built Neuss D310 which has an older brother, based on the same block, D358.  There are experts on this forum, of which I am not one, who may provide additional information, however I believe both engines are relatively straight forward swaps.

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The benefit of the Neuss D310 or D358 is the glow plugs do not need to be warmed prior to starting the tractor.  The starting issue with the early Neuss engines was low compression, caused by the use of 15:1 compression pistons, which require a single shot of ether and my tractors start relatively easy.  If overhauled and new pistons used which increase compression to 16:1, I am told the tractors will be much easier to start.  Up to this point, the tractors are not in need of an overhaul therefore I have not increased the compression ratio.

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9 hours ago, RichardDSalyer said:

My 706D has the very reliable IH German built Neuss D310 which has an older brother, based on the same block, D358.  There are experts on this forum, of which I am not one, who may provide additional information, however I believe both engines are relatively straight forward swaps.

Pretty sure that you would need a whole front half of the German diesel tractor as frame rails and hoods are longer 

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Mr. Salyer and bitty- Thank you both for the insight both of you gentlemen have provided to help me get Big Red back in the field. I really appreciate the info you guys provide. Big Red will rise again one day. If there is anyone else with any info or ideas that can give advice or knowledge to move my project forward I would certainly be most happy to receive it. Again, thank you!  texgyrene

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You should be able to find a junked out cotton picker with a 282 or 310, 358.  There should be a lot of them is certain parts of Texas.  Eason

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Eason- Thanks for the tip! I really appreciate the info. Anyone else with info and advice please feel welcome to add more info. Thanks, texgyrene

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On 2016-09-11 at 9:18 AM, Eason said:

You should be able to find a junked out cotton picker with a 282 or 310, 358.  There should be a lot of them is certain parts of Texas.  Eason

You can also find the 282 engine in  older Elgin self propelled brooms, barber green asphalt pavers and I am told several stationary powerplant systems

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A common implant where I live was used D301 engines out of junked 715 combines. A friend had one 20 years ago and it worked well for him. it also allowed the 706 to stay with a 4020 in the field. The D301 is a bolt in job and you can't tell it from a D282 unless you know what to look for. 

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If there's no hurry, look around for a 301, but I would rebuild the 282. In the long run it will be better than a half-century old used engine.

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I agree. We swapped in a junk yard 282 into one of the 656's. It had a bad head, so they sent us another, then it blew the head gasket on the new head. That head just got sent out for inspection and repair, and went back on today. Would have been better to fix up a core engine.

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Keith Scott, George 2, R Pope, Dave Shepard-  Thanks so much for your input on the engine swaps I'm considering. I recently picked up another 706 that has a 263 gas in it that was seized. Unstuck it with auto trans fluid and acetone. Thinking of overhauling it and putting in the 706 with the sleeve problem diesel that is dead. No one is interested in the rest of the gasser. Looks like it go to scrap or Craigslist for parts.  Again, thank you gentlemen for your input.   texgyrene

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The 282 was based on the same block as the 263 gasser so it fits with a minimum of hassle. The hood might be different for the gas exhaust to stick up but thats no big deal if the gas hood is good.

Personally I would overhaul the diesel. Probably not much more money involved compared to the gas and worth more when you're done.

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I have a ‘64 706 with the 263, and really like it. It just all depends on what you want to do with it. Mine starts well in all weather, and doesn’t burn near as much gas as I expected it to. Heavy fieldwork a lot, you MIGHT not like the 263, but for a chore/hay tractor, I like it.

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