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Suggestions ,Tips , Body Filler ??


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Restoring a 67 Travelall and there comes a time when body filler has to be used , Anybody have suggestions on brand preference,?

type? Would really like it to last for a long time , So any suggestions or tips would be appreciated .

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Lead

I just watched some youtube clips on the leading process. Seems easier than bondo in ways. Will a butane torch get hot enough or does it have to be propane?
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I'm not a lead guru nor a bodyman by any stretch. But stuff I've used surfacer/ skimcoats on has over years developed spider webs most likely do to temperature swings. Lead doesn't do that. If it's yours,classic and going to stay yours for a long time I think lead may be viable.

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Body filler always takes the blame for some ones piss pore metal finish job! Anytime ive ever seen problems with filler is when people try and form a panel with it by caking it on or filling rust holes with it or by not having the weld seam fully welded. If you weld in patch panels take a bright flashlight behind your welds in the dark and look for any pin holes in your weld..the slightest pin hole will let moisture in behind the filler and make it pop almost every time no matter if you use Bondo, All Metal or even Tiger Hair!

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  • 2 weeks later...

As a kid a 4x4 67 Travelall went surplus with the Green Mountain National Forest. In about 1972 it was considered huge. They sold by sealed bid in the day, they usually went cheap. I was a minor, dad didn't approve. I didn't buy it, the porcupines discovered it, and ate everything made of rubber. I don't remember how they got inside, but they ate everything that wasn't steel. Tires, hoses, wires, shift knob, dash, seats, & steering wheel. After that summer it wasn't worth having. Funny thing was they had a test plot with about a hundred varieties of wood nailed to stakes. It looked like a cemetery of sorts. The porcupines never touched any of the wood. They preferred the Travelall! I've always wanted one since.

Body filler is needed to fill the valleys between hammer marks. Too thick, you're asking for trouble. I'm out of it quite a long while now but I once did a good deal of rust repair. Buy or build the new part. Cut away exactly the amount of old metal to match the replacement patch. If there is still rusty metal, don't fudge it. You need more sheet metal to fill. Leave NO overlaps. Butt edges only. Preferably with TIG, weld a series of tacks to firmly fasten in position. Grinding with an air powered cut off tool to flatten the weld. Dolly, and hammer to stretch the new weld to correct area. Repeat tacking between first set of tacks slightly larger than before. Grind, dolly, & hammer again. As you progress, the shape should be correct for the body panel. If distortion happens the heated filler, and adjacent heat affected zone has shrunk. The hammer & dolly will expand it. Continue the process until it is fully welded. Skilled body men will leave only scratches from grinding. Minimal body filler will now be needed. Filler is non structural. It is also porous. It needs air tight steel behind it, and airtight paint covering it. If you need it more than 1/16" thick, work on your metal forming. Metal must be absolutely clean when it is applied. Do not attempt to spread without a proper spreader. Body spreaders are flexible polyethylene. In the old days I used polyester filler. Maybe they have something better now.

Willie

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Thanks everyone for the advice , Willie I need lots of practice ,But I am getting better , Thanks for the tips on metal work :) Wish I could afford a TIG welder ,stuck using a mig for now

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MIG works, but makes for a hard deposit. The tendency to apply too much filler, and quick chill makes it less feasible to beat it to the needed area. Hot metal is in an expanded state. If molten, it occupies the space available without stress. As it cools, it shrinks. MIG filler is too thick to lend itself to hammer and dolly or planisher .

I did lots of rust replacement 40 years before I owned a TIG machine. I almost exclusively used oxy acetylene. It is still my easiest weld technique, but the torch makes for a lot of distortion.

DC TIG isn't expensive. It can be done with accessory equipment on a stick welder. Often good old welders come up on craigslist cheap.

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