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Wes W

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Wes W last won the day on October 8 2019

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About Wes W

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 04/30/1951

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Quebec (QC) Canada
  • Interests
    My restored Farmall 200
    Tractors and ag equipment from '50s and '60s
    All things mechanical

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  1. You have written a beautiful eulogy! My sincere condolences for your loss of a good friend. Wes
  2. One of my fathers famous sayings: They can't "add" but they sure can "multiply"!
  3. If it is coin, at minimum it will need to be "wrapped". As said above, if you deal with a bank where you are a member it may help. The total amount will also be a factor; the financial institution has to cover the cost of shipping this coin back to Canada so if it is less than a few $100 they will not be interested. My experience when traveling over there has been that it has been very difficult to change CDN money (coin or bills) to US unless you are in a large tourist area that caters to Canadians; Florida, Texas, Arizona, New York City or the like. You might also have success if there is a casino close by that hosts Canadians. If you know someone who travels on occasion to Canada for either business or pleasure you may be able to sell the coin to them. Current exchange is $0.77. That said, banks will not give you that rate, they charge a transaction fee, so if you get $0.70 you will do well. Of course, you could come up and visit us......check out some old tractors, collectors, museums, maybe an ag event. Buying an old tractor at $0.70 on the dollar is a pretty good deal for you folks if you ask me! Much better than when I order parts from Bates, Steiners, etc. and pay $1.30 on the dollar ☚ī¸! Hope you have success!
  4. Wes W

    6 hours it took

    The closer to the "bone", the sweeter the meat! LOL
  5. That is a real hard kick where it hurts. you have so much to live for and much yet to accomplish, make your self a promise that you are going to beat this. We are all rooting for you and see in your photo that you have the best member of your cheering team at your side. Wishing you the very best, Wes
  6. Thanks to everyone who took a moment to look at pictures and respond with kind comments! Yes, I am sure you saw some of these tractors at Farmersville. I know he goes there every year and he is good friends with Mr. Tackeberry of Athens. As a matter of fact, during our visit he was telling us stories of tractors and trucks he had sold over the years to Tackaberry, as well as units in his collection that he bought from Tackaberry. They share information and rare parts as needed. Also of interest, he told many stories about Mr. Paquette, of the Paquette collection in Florida. They have bought and sold tractors and parts to each other for many years. Bad on me, I did not get serial numbers. Very sorry about that. I was so overwhelmed when I walked into the place that I think I kind of lost my sense of serious info collection. I hope to go back again at some time, I will do better next time 🙂 The other thing that does not come across in the photos and is hard to put in writing is all the stories. Every tractor had a history; where it came from, what condition it was in, sometimes how many hours, what was unique or different and on and on. In hindsight, I should of had a notebook to take notes. Also of interest were all the dealership stories; picking up tractors and equipment off the trains in Montreal and bringing them to the dealership. Setting up implements like manure spreaders.....how many hours they were allotted, setting up plows, discs, etc. What it was like competing against the other brands, what models sold the best, the importance of service and parts availability, what a wealth of knowledge and information! Anyway, glad everyone enjoyed the pics.
  7. I had the great pleasure of visiting the collection of Mr. R. Chagnon of Coaticook, QC this past weekend. Mr. Chagnon's father opened an IH dealership in Coaticook in 1956. Mr Chagnon took over the dealership after his fathers passing in 1977 and operated it through the Case/IH merger, selling to retire in 2002. He has gathered a beautiful collection of IH tractors as well as a few trucks, and some other nostalgic items. The entire collection is housed in a beautiful modern building, lots of good light and easy to walk through. I felt it was important to honour the great work he has accomplished in gathering and restoring these items by sharing a few photos with you. Most do not require comments, but I will add a few notes where I can. First a few overview shots: A few nice Scouts. One of them is a 4 cylinder. Also, and "Aristocrat"! Now some tractors: A very nice 600! A narrow track TD6: Many tractors had their manuals on the seat! An 826 Wheatland Hydro, I not very common. A 1206 Turbo Diesel, also rather unique! A few Hi-Clears: Apparently there were only four 664's sold in Canada, these were more popular in the US. Mr. Chagnon sold this tractor new and bought it back for his collection. Some more "Utilities: A very nice 6388 2+2: A 756 "Custom", IH's offering to compete on price against the competition like the green 4000. An 806 Wheatland GAS! When Mr. Chagnon found this 4156 it had a big triple-screw snow blower on the front (see holes in frame rails) and a big Detroit Diesel engine hung on the back to drive the blower. Some nice white demonstrators: A very nice assortment of "Industrials", some with Coleman FWDs. Some "100" series tractors: A nice 200 still wearing its original rear shoes! And with the "long rear axle" option! Even some Gold Demonstrators! The Cub Cadet was first available in Canada in 1962. This is a 1961 model that Mr. Chagnon's father went to the State of NY to purchase for an insistent customer who wanted one. Mr. Chagnon bought it back in later years for his collection. This one caught my eye, my father purchased this model when he retired. A French manufactured Cub: Back to some nice trucks, a 4X4 Loadstar 1700: This Fleetstar even has the original IH branded fog lights! I hope you enjoyed these pics, it was a dream realized to visit and here all his stories of many years as an IH dealer! Wes
  8. I am not an expert in cars of this vintage but by zooming in on your photo I thought the name on the front resembles "Studebaker". If you do a Google search for 1909 Studebaker you will see many photos and I see similarities to the design of the cowling around the rad, the rad cap, lights, etc. It's a possibility. Others may have better suggestions Cheers
  9. Yes, fussy is an understatement. these guys take this very seriously and it is obvious that success is all i the details. You are not supposed to disturb the plowmen or talk to them.....spectators need to keep their distance and NEVER walk on the "plot" and especially the plowed ground! Sometimes when they get off the tractor to do adjustments or take measurements they will acknowledge your presence or say hello. I take advantage of this to commend their work and maybe ask a few questions. One fellow had just walked his plot and took measurements of his remaining "land" from end to end. He was adjusting his outside coulter. I commented and he said his remaining land was a bit too large to finish correctly in the allowed number of rounds so he was widening the cut of the coulter by 1/2" so he would finish with the right width for his final pass. Amazing! No, I didn't. It was a bit too far to trailer.....I guess really it was more about the cost. Needed to be there several days before for the setup, stay the week. So, hotel rooms, meals, gas, etc., just found it a bit much. Maybe sometime when the match is in Eastern Ontario I would consider going to display my unit.
  10. I had the pleasure of spending two days at the IPM held in Verner, Ontario. This was the 102nd annual IPM and only the 2nd time it has been held in Northern Ontario. The weather was spectacular for the whole event, warm, sunny and very dry. They were estimating an attendance of 80,000 for the five days but I heard that their expectation was exceeded. Thought I would share a few photos of stuff that might be on interest to some here: This plowman is eyeing his results so far, plowing with a nice W4. A nice Cockshutt 30 . A nicely done Oliver 77 Standard Don't see many of these around here; a Nuffield matched to a David Brown plow. I have never seen one of these plows before. Based on some research I have done seems to be a British model. Found its way over here somehow. A B250 doing a nice job ! A 1954 Farmall 200 matched to a Hamilton Works C-2C-22 plow. Lots of tools for adjustments! On display a 1947 H that wears in rusty patina very well. This tractor is from a farm close to my old homestead and a tractor I drove when I was around 8 or 10 years old! A sharp 33 diesel on display. And this very nice C20 truck sitting in the antique tent. Hope you enjoy the pics! Wes
  11. 560Denis, Based on my experience with a similar 200, when you have the weight jacked off the front axle as suggested above by Matt, take advantage of this opportunity to grease all fittings. In particular the two vertical "extensions". Put in a few shots of grease and turn back and forth, a few more shots, turn again, more grease and turn. Keep doing this 'till you see grease coming out at the bottom of the vertical tubes. This may help. Good luck with finding it easier to steer! Wes
  12. I too have a Toro 22" with a 6.5 HP Tecumseh. This is its 18th year and it is still running well. It has "Personal Pace"; the harder you push the handle the faster it moves forward. Great on hills! Also electric start.....just turn the key. And it starts very well. The first battery lasted 15 years, guess I can't complain about that. I charge the battery spring and fall. The only negative....it is not the greatest at mulching. Grass needs to be very dry and not too long. That feature may have improved over the years. With the bagger it handles all grass conditions just fine. Good luck with whatever your decision is.
  13. Thanks for this info FarmallFan. I was hoping to not have to create a YouTube account, is that the only way to post videos here? Cheers
  14. I want to post videos taken with my iPhone. They have a file extension of MOV. The site will not allow this extension, can someone help me figure out how to change these to a file type that would be acceptable? Thanks for the help! Wes
  15. Okay, here goes for some of my photos of the Guinness Threshing event. First, I have to say that this was probably a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity; it is not every day that one has the chance to activity participate in the setting of a Guinness record! And to be so lucky that it relates to old machinery and tractors and memories from our childhood, well that just made it extra special. And finally, contributing to the cause of raising funds to fight breast cancer.....it was an honour. Congratulations to Francois Latour and his team of volunteers for an extremely well organized event! They have every reason to be proud of their success. Now for some pics: I thought this McCormick Deering 22-36 was rather interesting I always liked David Brown tractors, several neighbours in our area ran DB's, like this nice 880 A nicely restored International fire truck There were a few nice steam engines on site, here is one of them A nice lineup of tractors at sunset on Saturday evening with the white tents in the background The high lite for me was having the opportunity to have the Farmall 200 belted up to a threshing machine. I had the privilege to team up with some folks from SW Ontario. They had two threshers there, a George White and a JI Case. I tried on the GW but couldn't get the RPMs high enough to open the governor. It needed a larger pulley on the tractor. So, I belted to the JI Case; a 20" model, manufactured in 1907. JI Case was better known for their larger machines, apparently there were only 200 of these small models produced. It was in very nice shape and ran well! This was the first time since my tractor was restored that it did anything closely resembling "work". Lots of people cam by to "check things out". I even had a chance to pitch a few sheaves! The Farmall 200 wears its participation ribbon with pride! It was a great weekend!
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