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Big Bud guy

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Everything posted by Big Bud guy

  1. Its always good to see that some of those old buyers guides survived. I have a couple from the early sixties. This little IH 93 combine is from the 1964 buyers guide. Funny how the small photo shows steering wheel control while the larger pic shows no steering wheel, just levers for steering. I have a neighbor with one of those. Except his is a "pea" special or something like that. It has a tine cylinder. Looks similar to a baler pickup. I need to get a pic of it next time I see it.
  2. Looks like the cab is mounted on a JD 5020 in the pic. There was about a million 5020s around back in the day and maybe about half million now and yet I've never seen one with a cab like that.
  3. Here is a couple of pics of our Farmall M with the "bridge" Farmhand loader. First pic is the tractor brand new brought home by us in 1950. We finally took the loader off in the late 90s and during all that time it was never ever laid over on its side. 2nd pic is during harvest. The paddle elevator is a JD, the truck is a 1940 Chevy. We still have the paddle elevator, the truck, and the tractor/loader to this day.
  4. On a cold day in the field, I loved our MacDonald cab on our WD-9. And the pencil drawing of my friend Don Greytak's is also on the wall of our kitchen. I recreated that exact photo in reality on the farm, with our and Roger Long's fence, with Dad's #5 IHC Rod Weeders. Gary Gary, I had forgotten that you had the Macdonald cab on your WD9. That is another excellent drawing by Don Greytak too . I never get tired of seeing them. I have an ad here for another big tractor in 1951. I'd guess this Case LA would be in the same class as the W9 IHC. This one is pulling a disk followed up by a press drill. Looks like a 20 run drill so probably a ten footer. Nice ad. I always wondered how the LA compared to a W9 because we farmed with a W9 back in the day. I looked both tractors up in the Neb tests. Looks like the LA had 55 drawbar hp and the W9 only 44 hp. Both on gas. The WD9 had 46 drawbar hp. Thing is the LA wasn't tested until 1952 after they bumped the rpms up 50 so I am assuming it might have had a lower hp rating although probably not very much. Looks like the LA was a beast in its day.
  5. Loadstar The D you talk about would look more like this one. These pics I got off the internet. The D in your ad is a late unstyled D. They look similar to a late 20s D on the outside but there are a lot of differences such as the 3 speed tranny vs the older 2 speed. The steering is different. Different crankshaft and other things. And depending on what year Uncle Jack's D was the engine would be smaller (pre 1928). Actually it would have looked almost exactly like the 1936 model D . My mistake. It is a good thing the story was recorded in print to back up my faulty memory. Turns out great uncle Jack made that trip in 1935 and it was a new tractor. Price was around the $1200 mark. The story was printed in a book by Brian Rukes, "American Farm Tractors and Implement Dealers". I had sent the story to Brian exactly as my dad recalled it. Its an interesting book with plenty of stories and photos, plus a few vintage ads. Here is one of mine, another John Deere ad from 1951. Their first diesel tractor. The model R. I have that book so I looked up the article you submitted. Neat. We farmed with an R. Grandpa bought it used and traded it in for a JD 5010 in 1965. He also farmed IH TD 14A at the time and owned a Farmall M for haying duty. No pics of the R but I do have some 9 mm film of him drilling wheat with it. Great grandpa who was still farming at the time used a WD9, then a 600 and then he went green with a JD 830 and traded that in for his last tractor, a 4020. Was 80 years old at the time.
  6. My dad used to tell the story of his Uncle Jack that bought a John Deere D in the late 1920s. For unknown reasons he chose to drive it home rather than have it shipped by rail to his home town. In those days that was about a sixty mile drive. It took him more than a day. The D only went about 5 mph top speed. Luckily the lugs had not yet been installed on the rear wheels so he was driving on smooth steel. Otherwise he could have written a book entitled "Sixty Miles on Spade Lugs". It must have looked much like the D in this page from a 1936 Free Press Prairie Farmer newspaper. Loadstar The D you talk about would look more like this one. These pics I got off the internet. The D in your ad is a late unstyled D. They look similar to a late 20s D on the outside but there are a lot of differences such as the 3 speed tranny vs the older 2 speed. The steering is different. Different crankshaft and other things. And depending on what year Uncle Jack's D was the engine would be smaller (pre 1928).
  7. Ray, I guess that W6 could easily be a Super but I could not tell the difference from head on. Even from the side I'd only know by looking at the decals on the side of the hood. Like this one from 1955 showing a Super WD6 and 9 along with testimonials from their satisfied owners. Those are the ads I like the best. Ones with testimonials. About reading the owner of the Super WD9, that is about how much great grandpa farmed with on his W9 and later on WD9.
  8. That video shows the reason why every ranch around here had a Cat back in the day. Also, that was very interesting shot of the stationary baling with the AC roto baler.
  9. Loadstar I'm pretty sure that is a Friggstad. These guys are damn good mechanics but they have to be to keep stuff like that going. They told me one time they went out and bought up every gasket they could find for those Buda engines as they are getting scare. They are conservative in their ways. Up till probably 10 years ago they were using JD round back 95 combines. They use TR NH rotaries now but I still see a 105 or 95 out by the edge of the field once in awhile. They are the only ones left around here that haul grain with the single axle gasser trucks 300 bu at a time. There is nothing wrong with any of that to each his own but they farm a lot of ground. I think they seed over 3,000 acres and that much in fallow each year.
  10. Local farm still uses a pair of AC crawlers. The plow is 59ft wide. They put out about 160 hp. Takes bare minimum 400 hp to pull that same size plow with a rubber tired 4x4 by of course the crawler is only going 3 1/2 maybe 4 mph tops.
  11. Here is a pic of our 14A. We had a dozer for it too. Still have the tractor and the dozer. 2nd pic is my cousin summer fallowing with their TD18A and our farm in the background. We farmed right next to each other. They pulled 34ft with it. They also farmed with a D7 and they will tell you the 18A will out pull the Cat but the undercarriage wore out faster. They still have both. One summer we traded crawlers with them swapping our 14 for their 18. They needed ours to dig out a foundation for a new house. Anyways we fell in love with the 18. Being only a third bigger physically it "felt" like it had almost twice the hp. I suspect because it probably had a better power to weight ratio. Would have loved to have one but just couldn't quit afford it. The 14A was the last crawler we farmed with before moving on to a JD 5010 and 5020.
  12. That would include me Gary. I had wondered about the RD meaning. And its an interesting co-incidence that of all the Cat ads I have here I would post a model that was in your family history . This bigger, newer D6 Cat ad from 1951 quotes some impressive figures. 12 acres an hour pulling 32 feet of CP and only burning 3 gallons of diesel per hour. That beats my Magnum! That must be some mellow ground because around here 24ft was a good match for a D6 9U series or a IH TD 14A. About a year ago we scrapped a Graham Hoeme 22ft plow just like in the ad. Pulled it with our TD 14A too.
  13. Our 760 was a grey cab with the 354 Perkins with the belt drive variable speed. You would think with an engine that small in a combine that big horsepower would be an issue but it wasn't. I think the fact it didn't have a hydro helped out. And you're right. They will eat grain like no other. But that's if they are running. I thought the paddle feederhouse was the stupidest thing ever used and the fact Massey eventually went back to the regular slat chain proves that.
  14. Maybe he should advertise it on Kijiji. This 850 in Sask. looks like a lot of combine for $2000. http://regina.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-heavy-equipment-farming-equipment-850-Massey-Ferguson-combine-W0QQAdIdZ538406772 Here is an ad for a 1660 combine. Just a Case, not a Case-IH. This was the end of the line for Case combines and the biggest they made. Ad date is about 1971. I'm assuming they are comparing the 1660 combine to what looks like a JD 6600 in the "X" column going by the cylinder width. Funny they left out the 7700.
  15. We got along fine with our 510. Bought it new in 1964 and ran it until 1979. Never had too many breakdowns but it was sent to the dealer every fall after harvest and checking the records we spent at least $500 per year just to keep it going. Seems like it took more maintenance then our neighbors JD 105 which cut more acres year in and year out. We bought another 510 in 1975 and traded both for a new 760 in 1979. That was the last Massey combine we had as it had too many problems and the build quality was poor. I know when we traded it on a JD 8820 the auger flighting and other wear points on the combine looked almost brand new compared to the 760 even though both had the same amount of hrs. Seems like MF cheapen their combines up as they got newer and bigger.
  16. That's true. Their 2nd product was a sprayer and then came a harrow drawbar. Classic story of starting with nothing and finishing up with a global company.
  17. Only one of them worked for Massey and his name was Peter Pakosh. He started out making an grain auger in 1946. His brother in law Roy Robinson joined him that year also and together they started the company that would eventually be Versatile. The swather didn't come along until 1955/54 and by that time they were well on their way. Peter first offered the auger to Massey but they rejected him which is funny because over 20+ years later Massey ended up buying and copying their 145 tractor to make their own 4 wheel drive tractor the 1500 and 1800.
  18. I've never run one myself so can't really comment. I did know of one owner that changed the pulley drive to speed up the knife and he could cut hay as good as anything I had ever seen. Even that fine, wiry prairie grass. I was amazed. Here is another Versatile swather ad from 1972. Interesting how spell check does not recognize the word "swather". I see both Versatile ads mention a 330 self propelled swather coming soon. Never heard of one. Only ones I know of are the 103s, 400s, 4400s. I have a brochure for the IH 125 and I'm wondering how well the header auger worked since there is no center.
  19. Yes there were a few Jeoffroys around here too. Were those the one with the single spring on the shank? We also have an IH plow from the 50s. I don't know the model number but the frame is 3" by 3". It worked okay behind our tractors of the time but it is a little light for a chisel plow. It was also 17ft but I took it down to 13ft so I could pull it in front of a JD 14ft LZ drill. The JD 100 series with their 4"x4" frame built from the late 50s into the 60s was probably the best small plow back then. They still today bring $100 per foot at auctions were as $100 total is what a Graham or similar plow brings. Have a relative that pulled three 12 footers behind a D7 cat.
  20. About 1/4 from my house sits a GH plow that actually wings up. Only one I have seen. 90% of them around here were the small ones 10-18ft used behind the common wheatland tractors of the 50s. Those pics in the ad could have almost been taken on our farm back in the day. This spring we scrapped our 22ft lever lift Graham and 17ft hydraulic lift. The 22ft was used behind our IH TD 14A until we bought a 24ft JD 250F to go with our JD 5010 in 1964. Still have that plow. I don't know when we bought the 17ft but it was used behind a 4020, JD 830, and possibly IH 600 and WD9 depending on how old it was. And it didn't start out 17ft either as we added shanks as the tractor got bigger. The weakness of the Graham plow was the "I" beam frame. The frame tended to twist if pulled real hard breaking sod or alfalfa with spikes. Course the engineers probably didn't have that in mind when building these plows.
  21. Gary that is a fine quality scan of a truly vintage ad. I don't have many of that age or quality. Sometimes I get carried away and the quality suffers on the ads I post here. I took the time to "fire up" the scanner for this one. Dale 560 since you mention the Morris Seed Rite I thought I should post one of these very popular seeding units. Saskatchewan built, Morris, I sometimes wondered just how far south they were used, The older units were galvanized box. My dual hitch of M11 Seedrites had the red painted seed boxes. They were a great seeding tool back in the days of planting into black summerfallow but in heavy trash that rod at the back turned into a bulldozer which is one reason I moved on to an air seeder. Transport was no picnic either as I had to split up the two units every time I went down the road to the next farm. Back breaking work by yourself. I thought this ad was appropriate for an IH forum as it has what I think is a 4166 up front pulling 33 feet of Seedrites. I found 22 feet was about right behind a 2390 Case. Never have seen a box drill like that. I do have a relative that bought a New Noble air drill in the mid 90s that uses the same concept except it uses a 14" sweep to seed 2 rows 7" inch apart instead of just a single point hoe opener.
  22. I think Massey had a model or configuration for every state. I have a 55 diesel Western "Special". It has a hand clutch and arched front axle. Also have a diesel 555 with a hand clutch and but straight front axle and neighbor has a gas 555 with a foot clutch and straight front axle. It was when Massey went from the double digits to the triple numbers is when they upped the hp. I've heard talk of the "high arch" front axle Masseys. Seems to me most here had the straight axle. My brother has a triple 4 like that. I think it is a while since I posted this ad for Chevy trucks but in case anybody missed it, here it is again. Wow. I would think traction would be a problem. Soil must have pulled easy. Here are some Big Bud brochure scan.
  23. I believe that the "Special" tractors were just a newer model with slightly more displacement and horsepower. Somewhere in between the basic 44 and the 444 they offered the 44 Special. This ad from 1957 shows the line of "triples". This would have been about the last year for the Massey Harris name before they changed over to Massey Ferguson. Notice the name at the bottom of the ad, Massey-Harris-Ferguson. I think Massey had a model or configuration for every state. I have a 55 diesel Western "Special". It has a hand clutch and arched front axle. Also have a diesel 555 with a hand clutch and but straight front axle and neighbor has a gas 555 with a foot clutch and straight front axle. It was when Massey went from the double digits to the triple numbers is when they upped the hp.
  24. The ad mentions spraying up to 20 mph. I think Spra Coupes around here were doing good to go half the fast plus having to refill every 40 or so acres.
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