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GT&T

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About GT&T

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  • Birthday 04/13/1949

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    Griggsville Illinois

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  1. Duntongw When I read this statement it answers a lot of my questions. Next step. Hook up the fuel line from the tank to the fuel pump, with the pump off the engine block, and the outlet of the pump unhooked. Then pump the pump lever by hand, does the pump squirt fuel when you do? Then hook the pump back to the engine block and spin the engine over, does the pump squirt fuel then? If it does, then hook fuel line to outlet of the pump, and unhook the fuel line from the carburetor. Spin the engine over and check the fuel flow out of the line to the ca
  2. Bitty Thank you. Things have been going very well. I have been following along, this forum has been very therapeutic. Fred
  3. Duntongw You are right that the carburetor must be kept full of fuel. However you need to be sure that the carburetor is kept full of liquid fuel and not just have fuel vapor going to it. If there is a restricted fuel line at the tank and the fuel pump can pull air or vapor in the line from the sediment bowl then the carburetor will be getting vapor pressure and not liquid. This is what is known as vapor locked. GT&T
  4. IHrondiesel Thank you. It has been repainted, and the boy that did the painting and preparation did an outstanding job. Fred
  5. Alan Thank you. I've been very occupied for some time now, I have however been following along and this forum has been very therapeutic for me. Fred
  6. I've always wanted one, and now that I've got one I can't wait till the next time to drive it and work it. It is a very therapeutic piece of equipment. It will pull any thing that isn't too big for it, just like my Super H. It would pull the kinks out of the Mississippi River if you could get it hooked up. GT&T 😍
  7. Duntongw Does your tractor have a fuel pump? If it does then I would put fuel pressure gauge in the line at the carburetor. Then check the fuel pressure with the engine running with out a load and then again with a full load and watch the fuel pressure as the engine begins to stall. If there is a restriction in the fittings or lines from the tank, as the fuel flow is supposed to increase due to the increased load, the restriction will cause a drop in fuel pressure. You may have a weak or broken spring in the fuel pump, which will result in a loss of fuel pressure when th
  8. West Farms I think that this front end came off a Farmall A, or Super A, or Farmall 100, or 130. GT&T
  9. IH 88 You mentioned that the fuel flow, "To the filters is good". Have you checked the fuel flow, "To the injection pump? I have seen trash build up in the banjo fitting bolt and restrict the flow. GT&T
  10. Eason That is a very good photo and has excellent detail even when enlarged. 80 years later, that is quite remarkable. Do you know the location where it was taken? Are the buildings still there? Fred
  11. Brewcrew What I have done is to go to a salvage yard get some lights from a salvage combine. You can replace the sealed beams with halogen bulbs, or flood lights or LED bulbs. GT&T
  12. Mitch Welcome to the forum. I think you will find this is a wonderful forum with a wealth of information. GT&T
  13. 756 Puller What snoshoe said right on. I hope you are doing well. Fred PS I just read your 2nd. post. You should be able to replace the bolt in the release bearing as well, without splitting the tractor.
  14. Paystar Thank You for helping to clear up what I was trying to say. You are absolutely right. GT&T
  15. Nathanyel Welcome to the forum. You may try the Wisconsin Historical Society, they have a large volume of records from IH that they make available to anyone looking for information about International Harvester. I wish you luck. GT&T
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