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George 2

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Posts posted by George 2

  1. Loadstar: Thanks for that advertisement from Cockshutt with Ivan MacRae's photo. Ivan MacRae was the Chief Engineer of Cockshutt's Tractor Division. He is the Godfather of live or independent PTO on farm tractors. Ivan was from Glengarry County, Ontario and graduated from Queens University in Kingston, Ontario in 1937. In about 1940 he started working on the concept of a live PTO on the tractor Cockshutt was proposing to build them selves. The tractor became the Cockshutt 30 and the first one went off the assembly line in October 1946. Soon afterwards all other tractor manufacturers were scrambling to build their own version. The IH version was not introduced until 1954 when it debuted on the Farmall Super M-TA and Super W6-TA. This was seven years later. This is all detailed in the book "About Cockshutt" written by Bill Cockshutt himself.

  2. OBG: Regarding the posts above of the Farmall H and two different IH combines. The first photo is of the H pulling an early model 64 combine in the shadow of the mountains. It is an early model because it has the tall elevators. The early ones were produced in 1951 and 1952. In 1953 they installed shorter elevators. I have seen similar photos with the M and 122 combine in the same area in other IH publications and the area was identified as your home state of Montana. The second photo appears to be somewhere in the Midwest (maybe Hinsdale) and it shows the H with the earlier Model 62 combine. The Model 62 was built from 1941 to 1951.

  3. Actually a Super C. I have the original IH brochure showing this attachment and it includes pictures of it used in the Holland Marsh. You will note the higher grille and space between the Touch Control unit and the gas tank that distinguished the super c from the straight C.

  4. I was looking through the collection for a Christmas themed ad for yesterday and this is all I came up with.

    1952 O'Keefe's Ale.

    Ralph: O'Keefe beer was some of the worst tasting beer I ever drank. It was popular in the Montreal area in the late 1950's and 1960's. You could buy it in the quart bottle (twice the size of the standard beer bottle) and that would last you all night. And you never got drunk on it because you didn't drink too much of it. The only other beer I ever drank that was as bad tasting as O'Keefe

    was Newcastle Brown Ale when I was in Newcastle, England back in the early 1970's.

  5. And the 140 design lived a little longer after they restyled the 140 as the 150. The styling on the 150 was more squarish than the 140. I think the 150 was available up to near 1970.

  6. Here is new dual range power from International for 1960.

    What they talking about, multi-range?
    I don't know what they are referring to by the term "multi range" power but maybe somebody more familiar with the 60 series tractors can comment.

    Here is the line of combines for 1960. Guess they didn't have room for the 120 pull type swather in the picture.

    Multi range refers to the six cylinder engines in the 460, 560, and 660 tractors. It was an advertising term for shifting up and throttling back for the light jobs and gearing down with full throttle for the heavy work.

  7. George 2, on 20 Nov 2015 - 4:43 PM, said:

    When I worked for JD in 1970 I was given a complete set of sales catalogs of every piece of equipment JD sold in 1970. The WA-14 and WA-17 were included along with 4320 and 4520 tractors. These are all fairly rare JD products. The 7020 had just been introduced but I don't have a copy of the sales brochure for it.

    "Fairly rare" would be an understatement. They made about 50-60 total. Used to be several around here. One of my neighbors still has one but it was rebuilt into a Rite and there is nothing original left of it other then the frame. I have a late 1970 "Standard and 4-wheel drive tractor" brochure that introduces the 4320, 4620, and 7020.

    At the time I worked for JD in the summer of 1970, the inside info from my boss was that the 4520 was a dud and had many design faults. He told me they were coming out with a replacement for it that fall. The 4320 on the other hand, he said was a good reliable tractor. So your brochure is correct. The new 4620, 7020, and the already existing 4320. I drove a 4320 that summer testing out the 727 Gyramower prototype to replace the 707. It had a noisy cab with air conditioning.

  8. When I worked for JD in 1970 I was given a complete set of sales catalogs of every piece of equipment JD sold in 1970. The WA-14 and WA-17 were included along with 4320 and 4520 tractors. These are all fairly rare JD products. The 7020 had just been introduced but I don't have a copy of the sales brochure for it.

  9. Gary, that Sears/Economy tractor ad page is fascinating. Shows that economy was a big factor when farmers were shopping for equipment. I like the Model A engine "seasoned" too. I had never heard of these before but there were a lot of odd names back then which have long disappeared. Like this 1949 LeRoi Centaur tractor.

    http://www.gasenginemagazine.com/tractors/the-centaur-tractor.aspx?PageId=2#ArticleContent

    Our neighbor back in the early 1960's, JW Davis Equipment took one of them in trade in the fall of 1960. I remember it distinctly as I had never heard of one before. He sold it a few months later and that is the last I saw of it. I have also ran into the odd one at antique tractor shows here in Ontario over the years.

    George I bet that little Centaur is a rare tractor. Now this 1951 Farmall Super C is likely a little more common.

    There were lots of them sold in the area I lived in back then. One came to our farm in April 1953 and is still sitting in my shed where I now live. One owner tractor for 62 years. And it still runs well. There were two others within a mile of our farm also. Popular on the small dairy farms. An old IH sales manager once told me that just about every farm on the north shore of Lake Erie and especially in Essex County, Elgin County, and Norfolk County had one or more of them. Very popular as tobacco tractors also.

  10. Ralph,

    I so seldom get good ads for your site, but here is one from Facebook of a Sears tractor and auto/tractor conversions.

    This was a Model T near Harlowton, Montana that Dad tried to buy in later years, when I was a kid. Gary

    Gary, that Sears/Economy tractor ad page is fascinating. Shows that economy was a big factor when farmers were shopping for equipment. I like the Model A engine "seasoned" too. I had never heard of these before but there were a lot of odd names back then which have long disappeared. Like this 1949 LeRoi Centaur tractor.

    http://www.gasenginemagazine.com/tractors/the-centaur-tractor.aspx?PageId=2#ArticleContent

    Our neighbor back in the early 1960's, JW Davis Equipment took one of them in trade in the fall of 1960. I remember it distinctly as I had never heard of one before. He sold it a few months later and that is the last I saw of it. I have also ran into the odd one at antique tractor shows here in Ontario over the years.

  11. Here's a couple of McCormick hayloaders I saw at an Amish Harvest Festival in Shipshewana, IN last year. They were loading hay with another one and cutting wheat with a Daisy reaper and a McCormick binder.

    attachicon.gifMcCormick Deering 9 Bar Hay Loader, Shipshewana Harvest Festival.JPG

    attachicon.gifMcCormick-Deering Hay Loader ca 1902 Shipshewana Harvest Festival.JPG

    The one on the top was known as a Green Crop loader where I grew up. I only knew of one and it was used to load green clover and timothy on a wagon. Then you forked it off into the ensilage cutter and chopped and blew it up into the silo for the cows to eat in the winter. This predated the grassland farming craze in the mid 1950's when forage harvesters and a blower were used to blow the chopped hay into the silo.

    The one on the bottom is exactly like the one we had before we purchased a baler in the 1960's. Haying was a three man job. One person on the tractor and two on the wagon. At that time of my early life I was allowed to build the front part of the load. Mom drove the tractor and Dad built the load from the back. The wooden slats were quite robust and worked well. The ropes attached to them always seemed to be breaking even when almost new. I remember helping replace the ropes several times.

  12. There is a good passage in the new Red Combines book that describes the JD operating philosophy. They will not introduce new technology until their bottom line profit is negatively impacted by not adopting newer technology. In other words their accountants rule the roost. Compare that to IH where they had a skunk works working on the axial flow combines for over 10 years before the higher ups found out about the "garage" in East Moline. Very good book and congratulations to the authors.

  13. McCormick Deering and later McCormick threshers (22 x 38 and 28 x 46) were made in Hamilton, Ontario from somewhere in the 1930's up until 1953. There are still some stored in sheds here in Ontario.

  14. The place I worked at in the summers in the early 1960's had two TO-35 that were 1958 models and painted cream color. The 1956 TO-35 was painted gray. The 1959 TO-35 were painted red and had Massey Ferguson decals but were still TO-35. The following year they were called MF35. Not nice tractors to drive and the brakes were non existent.

  15. George2, good point about the swathers (windrowers)being necessary to allow the green weeds in the crop to dry down. Some years there was second growth as well which would make the grain sample test tough or damp unless it laid in the swath for a few days to dry down. Some years conditions were dry enough that you could straight cut dry wheat without a problem but until weed sprayers became common the green weeds would make the sample test tough. Untill a hard frost "dessicated" the crop and weeds.

    I think I have posted this ad before but it is my dad's first combine. The little Case model A that he pulled behind the John Deere D tractor. About the same time my uncle bought a pull type 12 foot swather

    Ralph: The IH 62 was a direct competitor to the case Model A.
  16. Combines started showing up in the Ottawa Valley after WWII. Our model IH 62 was a 1950 build and we bought it in the mid 1950's as a used unit. It sure beat stooking. We also had the model IH 8 windrower that came with it as windrowing was the only way to dry down the weeds.

  17. Here in ON. Mount Forest Foundry ( Ernst Bros. ) were still building The New Favorite threshers when I was going to High School there in 1954 & 55.

    They went out of business in the mid 1970`s

    Just thought I would let you know the old 1420 worked like a champion doing my neighbors oats last week. He really likes it and as I mentioned earlier we found a top notch 1020 15 foot head for it also so he is now getting ready for his beans.

  18. The last IH 22 x 38 and 28 x 46 threshers were manufactured in 1953 at Hamilton, Ontario as stated in a now lost IH advertisement I had. So the production run of these threshers was from 1925 to 1953. I have only seen couple of the late ones over the years. One of them is owned by a antique enthusiast and he had it at the Paisley, ON Heritage Show this year. It has the "McCormick" decals on it (post 1949). It was a 28 x 46 and was powered by his WD40 tractor.

    It is interesting to note that the 38 and 46 inch wide separators continued into the combines. The 151, 403 , 715, and 815 all had 38 inch wide separators. The 181, 503, and 915 all had 46 inch separators. The 1420 and 1620 also had 38 inch wide separators. The 1440, 1460, 1640, 1660 thru to the 2366 all had 46 inch wide separator housings.

  19. Delta Dirt: Looking at your boots in the picture, I wondered if they are tall enough for rattle snakes? I used to have a pair when I was with JD on a trip out to Montana and they appeared to be about 6 inches taller than yours. Comment?

  20. hat is the advertisement for the first year the Model S (with cross auger and sucker pipe) was sold. And notice the list of dealers. The dealer for Quebec where I grew up was none other than J.W.(Bill) Davis, our neighbor, and one of my mother's classmates in school. I remember hanging around his shop when they were assembling them and the wagons for shipment to the customers across Quebec.

    That is an interesting connection that you would know the dealer listed in one of these vintage ads I keep finding. I likely have a few more here but for today all I have is an Allis Chalmers forage harvester. They claim any 30 horsepower tractor will handle it. From 1952.

    Yes Bill was quite a dealer. He was also the distributor for Bombardier Skidoos as well. That started in the fall of 1958 and early 1959 when Bombardier gave him a preproduction 8 HP skidoo for him and his family to play with and evaluate. I along with his son and my two buddies all got to drive it. It was definitely underpowered and the following year the power was raised to 12 HP. Then in 1961 it was raised to 15 HP and that one was real good for flying through the snow and not getting bogged down. They went into full production after that and he had them in crates in his barn and they got shipped out almost as fast as they arrived. That was in 1962 and he handled hundreds of them for Bombardier over the 5 years or so until Bombardier started handling their own distribution. The Skidoo sure increased our freedom to travel in mid winter when the snow was 3 feet deep.

    As for the Allis forage harvester there was the odd one in the Lachute area but they were not popular. The McKee was much more popular at that time.

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