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George 2

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George 2 last won the day on May 9 2018

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  1. I have a international 383 made in the kamatsu plant in Japan. You have any info on this tractor. We are from ohio

    1. Gary scheetz

      Gary scheetz

      Anyone know much about the international 383 made in Japan by kamatsu

  2. A few items about the B414 gas . Yours is probably built somewhere around February 1963. Mine has a build of April 1963 on several of the castings and probably assembled in May 1963. The B414 gas was first introduced in the USA in 1962 but was not introduced in Canada until early 1963. Yours probably came in the first boatload in 1963 and probably was landed at Halifax in April 1963. Mine landed in Montreal somewhere in June -July period. It was shipped out to the dealer in July and I first saw it there at that time. We bought ours after negotiating for a month or so in November 11, 1963. Good rugged little tractor.
  3. Shane: May I ask what the serial number of your tractor is. I also have a 1963 B414 gas with power steering and 1501 loader. We bought ours new and it had the same seat as yours. Dad didn't like the seat and we changed it out a few years later for the 434 style seat. Ours was the only early gas one in the area and I just wondered where the rest of the gassers were. it now has about 4500 hours on it and never has had any significant issues. It is now more or less a shed queen. The serial number on mine is 2672 and engine number is 3902. Ours was originally sold out of the Montreal area. We moved away from there many years ago and it now resides here in western Ontario with me.
  4. On second thought give Richards Equipment in Barrie a call and I think Bob Junior will know the guy's name that has the 6 cyl M or Super M. BTW everything fits up at the clutch housing with the stock parts. The only surgery is the extended hood, at least that is the way it appeared to me.
  5. Farmall Doctor: There is a 6 cylinder Farmall M or Super M northwest of Guelph somewhere. I saw it at the 2016 IPM in Harriston. It had a C263 in it and it was a beautiful creation with some good bodywork on the hood. Ask around Chapter 20 and you can get his name from someone in the club. The guy is a well known collector from that area.
  6. Back 30 years ago I owned 59050 and later 61473. Both were black stripes but they got traded off in 1990 for the first Magnum 7110 I had. I know where 61473 is still about 40 miles from me but I don't know where the other one went.
  7. Yes, there were a surprising number of them sold in eastern Canada, and particularly in Quebec. I saw them as a kid at several of the farm shows in Quebec and eastern Ontario. In fact a local collector near me has two of them stacked away in his collection.
  8. This is what I know about this part naming system. During WWII the US military were dismayed at the number of parts and different systems for naming them that they had to stock to keep the war machine going. Ford had their own system that had the central numbers preceded by an alpha numeric prefix and if there was more than 1 there would be several alpha suffixes as in C1AZ -6731-A. This was the oil filter used in mid 1965 model Mercury and Ford cars. 6731 stood for an oil filter. C was for 1960 to 1969 the 1 was initial issue in 1961, AZ was for all models. The suffix at the end indicated there was only oil filter from Ford under the 6731 number. That system was developed in the 1930s. Ford was one of the few that had an organized parts system at the time. The rest were a hodge podge of alpha numeric numbers. So the US military procurement grew weary of this hodge podge and proposed several solutions. One was the GM system of 7 numbers. All I know is certain parts started with 1 (starters and generators for example), others started with 3 3tc. Then there was another system that was adopted by IH and Massey Ferguson. JD had their own system and did not change it. To this day you have no idea of what the part is by the number. I am most familiar with the IH and Massey System. The original system invoked at the end of WWII for IH used a 6 digit number followed by R1, R11, R21, R31 sometimes R41, and the usual R91. the R stood for two things R meaning revision 1 2, 3 as IN R1, R2, R3 etc. R11 usually stood for two piece assemblies. I think the R21, R31, and R41 were revisions to R11. Then the R91. The R91 referred to a part where there were several R1 parts composing all the parts in an assembly. So a 6 digit R91 assembly could have a dozen or more parts constituting the R91 assembly. IH also used the 5 digit designation for bolts and nuts and later on for whole parts. And IH would allocate batches of part numbers to the individual plants through the bills of material they were using. For instance the Tractor plants got numbers starting with 350000R1 in 1946 and continued to about 409000C1 in the early 1970's. The tillage people got numbers in the 450000R1 up to 550000R1 .Doncaster got 700000R1 to 750000 R1(I think). Hamilton got numbers for drills etc starting at 800000R1. Melrose Park got numbers in the 250000R1 to 349000R1. Not sure of trucks but I think they were in the 100000R1 or 200000R1 or construction equipment. So to an old hand like me I could tell you that a part with the 354000R1 was probably used first in about 1951. Similarly 368000R1 was first used in about 1958. And so on. By 1970, IH had gone to 7 digit numbers usually starting with 3000000R1 for the European produced tractors. They always had used the 1000000R1 for publications such as operating manuals. This was getting unwieldy so IH adopted the C designation (change) instead of R designation in the 1970 period. With the proliferation of parts in the 1970's this system lasted about 10 years before they were back again at 7 digits. By the Tenneco takeover the system was changed again to A(alteration). and the 91 designation was dropped So early Case IH parts had 6 digit numbers followed by A1, A2 for a revised version etc. When the CNH merger occurred the New Holland (FIAT) system of 8 numbers or more was used to get away from the confusing array Case and David Brown had brought to the mix of part numbers Massey-Ferguson adopted a similar system and they are still using the M (modification) as in 357323M1. Simply put they had many fewer parts than IH of Case IH had.
  9. Go to "YOU TUBE". Then search for "FARMALL M H 1930's SALES VIDEO" by mxman84. It is there and is one of my favorites. George
  10. Ralph: That photo of the Farmall H cultivating corn is on the 1939 introductory video for the Farmall A, H and M. Just go to Google to see it.
  11. My neighbor had an MF97 and one day the crankshaft broke. Didn't do any damage. It was replaced by the newer improved crankshaft from a salvaged MM G 1000. He kept it several more years and in 1985 traded it for a black stripe 1066. He still has the 1066.
  12. Nice. I am presently restoring a companion tractor, the International 544 utility gear drive gasoline. It is a fun project for myself and my son.
  13. From what I remember, Walker started the plant at Woodstock somewhere about 1972 and they produced mufflers for IH in the 1972 to 1978 period. My original 966 and 686 mufflers had made in Canada on them. I replaced the 686 one in 1980 and it did not have Made in Canada on it. I replaced the one on my 966 in about 1983 and it did not have Made in Canada on it either. I suspect the plant in Woodstock was a short lived venture over about 6 years. Yes, I know Walker is now in Cambridge. I do remember being told back then they were in Woodstock, but you may be right or it was moved to Cambridge somewhere around 1979. It would be interesting to know what happened. Similarly, I remember Timberjack being in Woodstock but after Deere bought them in the 1980's they disappeared. The reporters in the news media reported at the time that production was transferred to a plant JD owned in the US Midwest.
  14. Thanks, bitty. Yes, that was the name of the company. Walker Mufflers were common here. Don't know who owns them now..
  15. Yes, back then IH bought the 66 series mufflers from a company in Woodstock, Ontario. I can't remember the name of the company.
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