Jump to content

M Diesel

Members
  • Content Count

    9,905
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

4 Followers

About M Diesel

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 05/13/1956

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Olathe KS

Recent Profile Visitors

5,148 profile views
  1. Hello M Diesel

    I have a old td9 with a b style injection pump on it i think. I have Central injection send me a remaned scavenger pump about a month ago because my machine seemed like it was lacking fuel. After replacing the pump it started good and bleed good i run the machine for about an hour before it started surging then tried to over rev on me i slapped the compression lever back and the throttle back and it died down instantly. That was when i noticed that the injection pump was puking full out the top so i opened the petcock on the side and diesel ran out. That is when i decided i needed to check the scavenger valve. To shorten up my story i have disasembled and reassembeled the scavenger vavle several times with diferent square cut o-rings with no success still the same out come after about an hour run time. One question i have is does that scavenger valve need to be clocked a certan way in the injection pump so the holes line up or does it matter ?

  2. What is it going into? They run okay, but are not all that much of a power house. In stock form, roughly 60 to 80 hp depending. Parts are difficult. (I do have a set of 6 piston/sleeve kits for a TD18 which is the same size. PM for details.) Cam bearings have to be line bored etc. Finding good heads is the toughest part and I have no idea how they would stand up to hot rodding. There have been TD18 motors mounted in WD40 chassis that run okay but are front heavy and suffer for traction. These engines weigh a lot.
  3. Sorry for delay, not much time available lately. I think you had something wired wrong on the first attempt. Usually a change out fixes those kinda things. Yes power to coil is off during diesel to save wear on points and to reduce power drain. Original generators only made 8 amps so it mattered. From reports, usually the stay down problem is a spring on the carb side, missing or broke. I mostly use revs to switch to gas, gives time to catch it if it fails. Carb may also have gone dry while running and needs time to refill (which only can happen when in gas mode). I just shut down on diesel. Usually test the gas side first, but back to diesel and just pull throttle. That way I never leave it on gas side accidently. And if it won't catch on gas then I consider where I am parked and perhaps move to a better "fixing stuff" spot.
  4. Seats are a pain in the rear. When time is way short I have used more than one "special" version. Your wiring is fine for a single wire. I tend not to like a single due to the internal regulator often being responsible for battery drain. Add a master switch if the battery remains in place. Like most people I take mine out so not a biggie. That manifold switch isn't necessary anymore but I would leave it. However, being old it can be mentally untrustworthy when things aren't firing off right away.
  5. Personally, I would let them work the starter. There are plenty of parts to be had but it is getting harder to tell if you are getting the right ones. Likely the wheel tractor equivalent model is what you need to search on. My TD18 starter used the same shell and brush parts as my MD. It is possible the commutator needs some solder and trimming work. Those bars sometimes like to come undone. Ifn ya got some time, go for it. magic_mikey has the tools and just whips through it, but I had to resort to using a drill press for trimming and a propane with tip for the soldering. With some luck you may not have those kinda problems though.
  6. Ya got a lot of stuff there OBG. I see the blower and blade made the front line. The A is a beaut for sure. Might trade off my Cub for a Super someday.
  7. Sorry for delay, things is busy... Slow switch over is usually because I didn't kick up the throttle (enough) for running. Yeah that switch is toast. Hitting mechanical stop inside. Like the pics
  8. <OJGV> (Old Jewish Guy Voice) So some pictures would be asking so much already? When are we to be seeing this miracle of chemistry? </OJGV> Have seen molasses work very well but it is slow (molasses eh?) and stinks to high heaven.
  9. Good stuff Chris. About turning, they nearly always require a brake to do it. Have to stop the track, or else it is luck if there is enough drag to make a turn. Pull clutch enough to disengage and hit brake and around it goes. There is a second steering technique for downhill where you pull the opposite handle and let that side accelerate past the track that is still driving. I don't use it often. Levers can be confusing as it is. Also be aware of high spots and low spots. Never steer over a low spot. You want the middle of track on a high spot. It will turn on a dime. Over a low spot the idler and sprocket are supporting the machine and suffer great stress when turning like that. Essentially, if it struggles to turn you are doing it wrong. Have had the carb drain petcock fall into the drip tray on the MD more than once. No need to up the diesel before change over. Switch, then raise throttle. Otherwise it will try to foul spark plugs. There is plenty of time.
  10. From Ralphs numbers, ~$1.035 Yankee to Canuck ratio.
  11. If these come out correct... $273,528.46 $235,691.49 $189,714.79
  12. That's some crazy stuff. Must have been soft. I see the drawbar is bent upward.
  13. Breaking out the big gun? Looks like some serious wrenching. I once had an RV try to do that rumpled box conversion. Luckily it didn't get into that much trouble. Made for about 20 miles of super tense driving. I stayed in the left lane and drifted right when the real heavy gusts hit.
  14. Babbit is a special version of everyday solder. Too hot and it oxidizes badly.
×
×
  • Create New...