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Mark (EC,IN)

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Everything posted by Mark (EC,IN)

  1. If you can get it, many times it's easier to get the whole rear stand (steering wheel, shift linkage etc.) and just swap it out.
  2. There is an extremely high "COOL FACTOR" there!
  3. A live PTO would be like is on some MF tractors, you have to stop the tractor to engage the PTO, but then the tractor's forward motion can be stopped and the PTO will continue to run...MF uses a two stage clutch to accomplish this. An Independent PTO has it's own clutch ........Like an IH 400 or 560 .....you don't have to stop the forward motion of the tractor to engage the PTO ...... just engage the PTO clutch and the PTO will start.
  4. I know nothing about operating a Hillside combine on hill sides. But, Auto Steer on tractors have a Terrain Compensation feature on them for hills when doing sub inch accuracy operations. I would think that could be integrated into the hillside combine.
  5. Were the Cockshutt and Oliver PTO's of that era just live PTO's or independent PTO's?.
  6. Your post reminded me. There is an area about and hour from me, above Greenville Ohio, that is Mennonites or German Baptist (I've heard them called both).....but I love to ride through that area. It's like the 1950's and 60's of my youth. Livestock on every farm, still a lot of silos, no housing editions that have been sold off.....it's beautiful country.
  7. I have some Amish neighbors that raised them a few years back and sold meat. Working them was pretty much like cattle, you had to be slow and steady ..... the difference was when you spooked the cattle "they" ran.....you spook the Bison "you" ran
  8. I just put one on my 560 this week preparing for winter, It's my snow mover. I used to mount the blade on a cab tractor, but a few years back we had enough snow I had to pile it with the loader (which is on the 560). I also spent a few hours trying to get the barn doors open (they were frozen) to get the 1086 out of the barn ........ the 560 will fit in an old shed that requires no door help and it starts with out being plugged in so it got put on snow duty. The loader is in the way in the picture, but It's one of the older IH ones that says "IH Windbreaker" on it.
  9. Didn't Wood Bros build the early Ford balers? Not sure about the later ones.
  10. That is why I always found one my neighbor had better, it said: Trespasser Today ................ Rottweiler Sh%T Tomorrow
  11. Good luck to both of you in the future. You are lucky to have your dad with you all those years.
  12. I agree with this statement, you have to remember it's an "H" pattern, not a Z.
  13. If you can't get a kit I would go to a local hydraulic shop. I had a cylinder start leaking on my corn planter this spring, it was one that folded the planter. Deere couldn't find a kit (everything backordered) so I took the parts to a local shop and he had everything at about a fourth the cost of the unavailable kit from Deere.
  14. I doubt that...............about every three hours you had to get out and fix something on it. 😁
  15. I have to agree with Big Bud Guy here … the MF's I had were horrible machines, very seldom that they were not broken at days end, but they could put a clean sample in the tank. A good grain sample and fuel efficiency (the diesels) were all they had going for them.
  16. My dad had a 6' Massey Harris Clipper when I was a kid. I had a 300, 510, and a 750 during my early farming career. In it's defense, the 300 was worn out when I got it................the 510 and the 750 were probably the two worse machines I ever owned. I thought I'd died and went to Heaven when the MF's left and a 1460 showed up.
  17. The MF 35 and 135 are not even in the same category as a Ford "N" series. The MF's have live PTO and hydraulics, six or 12 speeds trannies, and power steering.....a much more user friendly and useful tractor. They are much more modern, perhaps a 2 or 3000 Ford might compare, but nothing in the "N" lineup is close. I have one that is my yard tractor.
  18. You first need to see what your loss is by just throwing the 1' by 1' square out (I can't remember the seed to loss ratio, it's written on my square for beans and corn). After you know what your loss is, then you need to see where it's coming from. Do a "power stop"...just turn the key off with the machine full, grain on the ground in front of where you were is pre harvest loss.....grain on the ground between where you stopped and the front of the combine (behind head) is header loss....behind the combine is separator or cleaning loss. Look inside the machine and see where grain is that it shouldn't be to locate the loss (on walkers...rear of rotor...back of sieves etc.) I will admit a seed as small as canola might make this tougher all I deal with is corn and beans and maybe wheat,....good luck
  19. I know the company is not in business anymore, and I have no idea if another company took them over, so I have no idea if parts are still available. That all said, I helped on a custom silo filling crew back in the 60's and 70's that ran Fox choppers ...during that time I ran a Custom 7's...Super 1000 and a 3000, plus a self propelled (forget model number) with a Detroit that was LOUD! I think for that time period they were as good as their was. It's the reason I wanted this toy ...... pure nostalgia!
  20. I got out of pulling back in the 90's ........ but even then I owned a magnet! 😁
  21. Several observations in my post: First to the original poster.......what is "a front mounted two bottom plow and one in the back"? Also, in my experience a WD could plow with an "M" as long as they were using the Allis "snap coupler traction control set up" ....hook a pull type plow to the Allis and it was over. Also, who ever said there is no substitute for cubic inches ....don't for get a late Deere "A" was 321, and I never saw an "M" have any trouble hanging with the A's. And last, almost every farm around here had a Ford or Ferguson tractor back in the day, but they had a loader on them to get under the low ceiling haymow ....unless there was hay to rake they never went to the field.
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