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ray54

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ray54 last won the day on July 28 2022

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    Paso Robles California

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  1. You got will remember your daughter in prayer.
  2. Very normal HOT AND DRY. June,July, August, September, 85 to 105 normal. If humidity is, low it cools 30 to 50 degrees from high to low.
  3. Thank you for coming back with the fix 😉 even though we did not help. Always good to check the brakes before diving into a nonmoving crawler. I had a Cat rust the brakes to the drum in 6 months. Had been rolling it around the yard as it would only pull with one track. I wanted it moved to mow weeds again, no roll. A I will get to it tomorrow thing. Finally tomorrow came, pulled fuel tank and bands rusted to drum.
  4. That would be driving with what was called a "jerk line". This picture shows 2 lines so may have had bit on 2 leaders rather than one. Before my time by a bunch, but my grandpa drove combines with a jerk line. More from reading and back and forth with Gary and others that know more than I, many horses and mules that had been worked enough it was just get though the day without the extra effort to cause a wreck. They would keep a few young more bronc type from running away with the whole thing. Those were the ones to get rock up side the head or whip if they did not pull their share of the load. With good crops here harvest could over 3 months long and very hot. A real good way to take all goofing off out horses. My grandpa was noted to carry rocks in box or bucket on the seat. Was very good throwing with his left hand. Had the jerk line or a bull whip in the right. Was reported to be very good with the bull whip as well. The first harvest I have any memory of would be 1960 I think. They bought a diesel Cat 35 in 1934 to pull the combine. So I never saw any family farm with horses. My dad cut and raked hay with horse until WW2. At which time the government was buying lots of horse. Came across paper work from him selling horse to government. In the 1960's there were still several 70 to 80 year olds making hay with a team of horse.
  5. I helped tow an old KW (1952 I think it is) that had maxis and a bad engine. Used old Ford F600 farm truck and a Emglo compressors with a Honda on the truck bed to tow with tow bar. Just the compresser plumbed into a glad hand hose. Had a driver in the KW to steer and apply brake at intersections. All went well 140 miles or so.
  6. Not to be a smart a$$ but looks like a angle iron over the end of the plywood might be needed to keep the persistent bear out.
  7. Might as well call Juneteeth mix up day. Slaves in Texas were freed by the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. Which freed slaves in states that were in revolt against the USA. But since Texas was in revolt they did not care about USA law. But slaves in state that were not in revolt were not free until the 13 Amendment was ratified by 27 states which did not happen until Dec of 1865. So for all the law scholars, since Texas was no longer in revolt after April 1865. Were slaves really freed on Juneteeth or just escaped?????? Just things to think on if you end up with time to read history.
  8. I grew up with a hand clutch and still run them on my crawlers. And per New England's question back a few pages, I have used a loader and a hand clutch. But again it was a crawler. It was a AC HD 5G. But I have thousands of hours on a HD 5 B since I was 14 or 15 years old. Everything about tractor operation was more or less muscle memory. Back when still doing tillage with the HD5, I learned just like with a truck just how much RPM to let it lose and then hit the clutch and slam the gear shift straight ahead to go from 4th to 3rd gear without having to use the brake to keep from rolling back. The transmission inter lock is activated by the clutch lever so shifting any crawler I have driven without disengaging the clutch was not going to happen. So loader work I did with HD 5 was all slow tight work so no real speed anyway you did it. Just put the load were it needed to be. I can see it being much harder to learn hand clutch and loader controls at the same time. I have more time on Cat 9u D6's than all the rest and they never shifted like the AC but twice the HP and weight, so you don't want to slip and jerk things around break things twice as easily. Back to that nasty JD hand clutch. It is backwards to all crawlers I have ever driven. Since I started on it before I was set in my ways, it was the other hand going the other direction. Never had a problem reaching for the wrong lever. Since all my balers have had there own engine I got to were I really like the hand clutch on a hay baler. Just got to where I could sit up there kind of sideways and watch the pickup and keep a hand on the clutch and just inch into a wad of hay or a rebale. Just baled 300 with a 70 HP Kubota and was missing my old hand clutch and the sitting up way higher. I never drove a IH , H or M but they baled a lot of hay in this neighborhood, maybe I would of like them ever better. Since I have never drive that much without a hand clutch I get along and like them. How were the hand clutch's set up on the IH wheatlands? Left or right side, pull it to you to engage like a crawler?
  9. Ask on Antique Caterpillar Machinery Owners Club, or ACMOC. If he joins over there, he can get access to the library with operators, service man books and parts book. As well the guys that have work on those for 40 years.
  10. You got all around me, you just did not get JM Wildman in Paso Robles Ca. I have kept my eye out and not found one for them yet. All the Caly dealers you have decals for sold a lot of crawler tractors, but were full on Ag dealers. Just that irrigated farm land out here was deep ripped every few years and crawlers did it. I was told Ortens was one of the biggest IH dealers in the 60's and 70's. In a little old nothing town in the middle of 10 to 20 of the largest farms at one time. JG Boswell, West Lake farms, South Lake farms, Saylor farming, and bunch more from the cotton king of the San Joaquin Valley. A 10,000-acre guy was the little guy among them, with JG Boswell at 135,000 acres.
  11. Yes I will miss him. I did several rounds with him telling me ag in California doesn't matter. Which from the political end is completely true. But currently still produces more money from ag than any other state, all specialty crops, or crops that don't handle cold. After the first few rounds it was just to see if I could get another round out of him. He had a come back each and every time, never gave in until I let it drop. But always a gentleman.
  12. I use to have that problem with socks as well. A new piece of leather and old time rubber cement glue. Fixed just like new again. With acks and pains in joints legs and feet I don't put the steps in to wear boots much anymore.
  13. When straps where the new thing every farm magazine had an article each issue about being careful with the straps. The straps were not breaking it was the clevises, pins, and chains used to attach to the object being pulled. They would go whizzing off in any direction, and people did die.
  14. Fungus multiply exponentially, in the wine business it was spray early and spray often, so it never gets ahead of you. Ten years ago as I was getting out models being tried that took into account temperature and humidity. But you need the temperature and humidity from in the canopy where the grape bunches were. Then put information in the formula and could extend days between sprays sometimes. Would think the control it early would appley to soybeans as well. But understand with lower value per acre you cannot afford to spray as often.
  15. I am also interested what you find inside. I have been around several guys that worked alfalfa out here in the good old days, so April to October. And don't know anyone having trouble with the tine bar. My baler is early 70's I think and that has never been a problem except the tines breaking or needing to adjust tines to get a square bale.
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