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HMR

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HMR last won the day on October 27 2021

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  1. Jim, In 1957 Paul and Daddy bought a new holdover 400 LP (450 had just come out) and a new 140 IH pt combine. Man, we thought we had the world by the tail: live pto, ta, plenty of power. Here is Paul unloading wheat into our 1951 Chevy truck with a new Flasco box. Would I love to relive those days! Both tractor and combine came from Schmidt Implement in Willow Lake, SD. Best, HMR
  2. I like the rustic, North Woods style camper.
  3. Have a question for the LP men: twostepn2001 shows a Super M-TA with the propane tank mounted lengthwise (the picture with the cotton stripper). Sledghammer show us two more with the lengthwise tanks. However, Tonyinca shows his with a crosswise mounted tank. When I grew up in South Dakota in the 50s, Super Ms on LP were quite popular, but as I recall, all had the tanks mounted crosswise. My question: when in the 1954 production of Super M-TA LPs was the change made? Found this on on YT site: J.D., IH commissioned 500 SM-TA to be built They used the LP Tank companies to complete the conversion work even thought they were not all completed at the factory,....Were considered Factory tractors, There were about 5 known LP Tank companies that did the work 2 in Texas and the other 3 scattered through out the Deep South. In Texas,,,, San Angelo and Lubbock. The quintessential SM-TA Has a long wise tank with a Mono-valve assembly @ the 11:00 o clock position at the rear of the tank if you were sitting in the seat. Not the Cross-wise tank the SM Stage I. & Stage II had. The Stage III SM,,,aka.. SM-TA had this type of tank mainly The one below it the 2nd one I have seen. A Stage III, SM-TA with a crosswise tank that would be rare. Of the 500 built there were no consecutive #s known of, IH would pull the tractors at random then load up RR flatcars or trucks and sent the tractors to San Angelo or Lubbock, less Carbs and tanks and completed there and shipped on the Dealers. The Tank Companies would load up tanks and Carbs and sent them to the factory to be completed there then sent to the dealers. The reason for the long tank helped make up the difference of the longer Torque tube needed to hold the TA unit. Plus I think it was prototype for the 400/450 series and then the 460/560 series. IH was notorious in poor record keeping so the information I have has been gleaned from other researchers, old IH Service guys, Dealers, Certified Field Reps. About 5 yrs ago I knew of an old IH Field Service guy that did field conversions @ Farms ans Ranches. He converted Gas tractors to LP Under IH Authorization! he had a little Black Book .....Farmers,Names Addresses, Ph #s, + The Tractor Serial # he worked on!!! He had authority the re stamp the factory tags!!! He died, Kids cleaned out his home, Little black book was thrown away, All that Information... Lost Forever!!! OBTW the pic above the round SM-TA emblem with NO wing Is A TA Delete Emblem, Yes that is not correct for that tractor. The Circle with the wing is correct for TA equipped tractors YES, a SM-TA factory delete IS still a SM-TA tractor! JD My # is 512-577-3837 if you should like to visit about this more in depth, Call most any time and I will visit with you and tell all I know I just don't care to type this much. Hope this helps, Look forward to visiting with you or others about this or other tractor subjects. Later, John A. [Reply] [Send Email] redgems 02-03-2011 21:08:12 Report to Moderator
  4. Have a question for the LP men: twostepn2001 shows a Super M-TA with the propane tank mounted lengthwise (the picture with the cotton stripper). Sledghammer show us two more with the lengthwise tanks. However, Tonyinca shows his with a crosswise mounted tank. When I grew up in South Dakota in the 50s, Super Ms on LP were quite popular, but as I recall, all had the tanks mounted crosswise. My question: when in the 1954 production of Super M-TA LPs was the change made?
  5. All these old Texas photos remind me of those I took at the museum at the Texas State Penitentiary in Huntsville. First is a Super M on a baler; next is a fleet of John Deeres, all operated by convicts. Are these JD "Gs?" Do any of you Texans know whether they still operate a prison farm? I know they discontinued the prison rodeo some years back. Best, HMR
  6. SDMan: "It works like a saddle on a sow." Jim, that's a great line! I'm going to remember that one! Best, HMR
  7. Roger, I'm looking forward to your post. Best, HMR
  8. Some more early 20th century history. I was browsing through my dad's memoirs and came across this: "In my boyhood days we had many horses, both driving and draft. We raised practically all our own horses, and I broke and trained many. We purchased our first gasoline tractor, a one-cylinder International Harvester, with which we plowed, threshed, shredded corn, and ground feed....later we traded off the old International tractor for a Minneapolis two cylinder and a year later traded it for a 20 HP Case steam engine. We also purchased a new 10/20 Titan gas/kerosene tractor which pulled three bottoms. We had this tractor for 10 years, and I ran it exclusively. In 1929 I purchased a 22/36 International tractor. That was quite an advance: a 4 cylinder, 4 speed tractor on steel pulling a 4 bottom plow and big enough for threshing and other farm work." My question for the experts: what IHC models of this era (1899 to 1929) were one cylinder? (The only one cylinder IH I know of is my Cub Cadet 125 with a Kohler K301A one cylinder!!) What say the experts?
  9. Guys, I'm just about done with my old pics A few more: My two aunts are in the bunker. I don't recognize the operator. My dad and uncle binding grain with 4 horse teams. Pouring out the smoke! Threshing in 1944 with Grandpa's 1940 Farmall M. I was 5 years old at the time, and I still can hear the big M's governor open up when the bundle pitchers forked in the wheat bundles. I also recall how the loose pins in the drawbar would sing as the M worked hard on the belt. My dad is wearing the straw hat with the wide band in the front.
  10. Is this the same Avery that I posted earlier? This is my dad with a wrench in his hand.
  11. Roger, I am again indebted to you for identifying these old tractors, both gas and steam. Why were they called "bob-tailed?" Here are a few more of Daddy and his IH 15-30 he bought in 1929. He always called it a 22-36. It did everything on the farm except cultivate corn and make hay. One pic shows it on a 10' IHC power binder,
  12. twosteppin2001: I don't know who took the photos. They were in a cardboard box I inherited from Daddy. I see you have a 560 LP. In the late 50s and early 60s central SD was full of them, many of them sold by Schmidt Implement in Willow Lake, SD. When the 806s and 706s came out in 1964, the lpg versions burned valves so badly that most farmers switched to Diesel. I have an IH 650 lpg, a remnant of a bygone era! Incidentally, the antique tractor club in Fredericksburg TX has an IH 650 lpg that was willed to them. A few years ago I had the privilege of driving it on their annual Bluebonnet Tractor Ride. It has the foot clutch; mine has the hand clutch. We spend winters in Kerrville camped on the Guadalupe River.
  13. Great! I'll label this pic as a Titan 15-30. Thanks again to the "University" and "the Professor!" Now what do we have here? a steamer powering a corn shredder, blowing the fodder right into the haymow on my great uncle's farm one mile south of Grandpa and Daddy's farm in Beadle County, SD. This beautiful big barn was torn down not too many years ago.
  14. Roger and Gary, many thanks for your identifications of these tractors. I agree, it's an IHC Titan. I'm looking through Wendel's book and it sure resembles his pictures of 8-16 Titans, but bigger. Here's another pic of the same threshing outfit, and you can just make out the old IHC logo on the front. My uncle and my dad are standing in the center. The rest of the bundle pitchers are neighbors and hired men. I had never heard of "the flaming four." You fellas are good!
  15. Old Binder Guy, thanks a million for your reply. Roger said you were the go-to man for steamers; he's right! I appreciate the depth of your reply as well as all the pics. Wasn't that Case 150 at Andover? Another of Daddy's pics: He's standing in front of the tractor. Beadle County, SD
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