Jump to content

redneckchevy9

Members
  • Posts

    3,048
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Everything posted by redneckchevy9

  1. Those are some interesting tires on the 2nd picture - never seen those before
  2. While never have driven one (YET), I still love them
  3. In the agra farmer ad, it explains that all 4 tires are the same size & track the same path......just like a 2+2?
  4. "Fairly rare" would be an understatement. They made about 50-60 total. Used to be several around here. One of my neighbors still has one but it was rebuilt into a Rite and there is nothing original left of it other then the frame. I have a late 1970 "Standard and 4-wheel drive tractor" brochure that introduces the 4320, 4620, and 7020. At the time I worked for JD in the summer of 1970, the inside info from my boss was that the 4520 was a dud and had many design faults. He told me they were coming out with a replacement for it that fall. The 4320 on the other hand, he said was a good reliable tractor. So your brochure is correct. The new 4620, 7020, and the already existing 4320. I drove a 4320 that summer testing out the 727 Gyramower prototype to replace the 707. It had a noisy cab with air conditioning. & we are back to diamond treads again
  5. Bid Bud, thanks for the link - it led me to this great story about McCue Farms & their Wagners http://www.wagnertractors.com/documents/ClassicTractor-Eight%20wheels%20on%20my%20Wagner%202002.pdf This might make some people mad or saying that I am bashing JD, but just gonna put it out there for you guys to read: This paragraph is in the article "As it turned out, these tractors were only a stopgap measure to allow Deere more time to develop their own articulated four-wheeldrive, the 7020, launched in 1970. Sad& a cod& written into the origind contract between Wagner and &ere stipulated that if Deere stopped buying tractom from Wagner, Wagner coutd not produce a competing tractor for five years. Wagner was effectively written out of the farm tractor business."
  6. Oh you crazy canandians & all your toys for snow travel.
  7. That snowmobile conversion looks like the one the mail man uses on one of the xmas claymation movies.
  8. We call those sissy sticks Lonestar
  9. Upon further inspection, I noticed that it states it has Timkin bearings & pinion. I wonder if it is the same Timkin plant in Fulton, IL.....it is now Timkin/Drives but I wonder....... We make deliveries to the plant at least one every couple weeks as we supply all their lumber for crating, cribbing, etc... A few old timers there told me once that back in the glory days, they made chain for all of the big implement manufactures.
  10. We always called it the heat houser, even though it was the IH nylon one. In a post several months back, Dr. Evil stated these were twice as exspensive as the canvas ones. My grandpa bought a brand new one to put on his new 756.
  11. Very timely add to post also Lonestar. So Heat Houser was a brand not just a generic term hmmmm I did not know that. We just call all of them that, just like all facial tissue is Kleenex.
  12. Yes, I like the hats too. Don't ever recall seeing one though. Remember when truck drivers wore hats like the guy in this 1955 GMC truck ad? I was a bit surprised to see the hydramatic was offered for the heavy trucks too. In those days most around here even questioned if an automatic transmission would "stand up" in a farm pickup. That is a bit odd - wonder how many were sold with the Hydra's in them.
  13. Didn't notice @ first, but in the upper right corner of the page of hats, it appears that you could order them with the International Truck logo or IH logo.
×
×
  • Create New...