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Farmall Doctor

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Everything posted by Farmall Doctor

  1. I don't know what the original source is, it was sent as a screenshot of where someone wrote it out. I've been asked to provide sources for years on many subjects, and it's a waste of time because the questioner usually comes back by saying that they don't approve of that source. If i see more, I'll try and share it. from the original source.
  2. .... if it were an "immunization", you would be immune. it's just a shot. Recent stats that I saw were out of Quebec, who has the tightest lockdowns, curfews, etc. Out of all the hospitalizations, 90% plus are double vaxxed, and many are boosted.
  3. Also, with the proper square plug removal tool, sometimes going clockwise with it once to break it free saves the plug from rounding out after years of guys just using a 1/2" ratchet and cutting the corners.
  4. That series and their successors were well built engines and powertrains. One customer of mine has an 825 with turbo that dynos at 145HP! (that's when the old Super MTA style PTO started slipping.. haha). Another 825 was running an irrigation pump and threw the fan belt. It ruined the rad, and was still running full out without any coolant when the farmer saw a cloud of steam and had to run back to shut it off! I replaced the rad, hoses, all of the plastic isolators on the hydraulic cooler lines and put some fresh 30W oil in it. It is still running today without any issues. We sold them at the old shop and I was only ever inside one engine, due to extremely poor maintenance. They had never cleaned the centrifugal oil filter or changed the coolant in it's life. Liner O-rings, head gasket, and a cooling system flush, and it is also still running.
  5. ...yea, because those of us that rebuild these tractors full time know nothing about proper maintenance...
  6. I saw an independent article recently with the headline "one step closer to farmerless farms"... I found that troubling. Of course with the hatred that urbanites have for farmers, it's not surprising. They would probably be happy sitting in their prius stuck behind a tractor if it is operated by a computer and not a "Damned Farmer".
  7. Oils have changed and as such, the engines have changed to run the new oils. This is still an old engine and should run the "old" oil.
  8. He may not need to use Russian produced engine oil, it's the grade that matters. The Belarus owners manual doesn't say "only use Belarus engine oils" it says specifically what grade.
  9. Yes, the 914 had a full width 4 bladed fan like all other combines. I liked the 915 except for the cleaning system.
  10. The right answer always is to follow the recommendations of the manufacturer!
  11. Those big pulltypes always intrigued me. I had wished that the 915 had the 914 cleaning fan system... that would make a fantastic machine! I do enjoy using my #80 whenever I get the chance.
  12. Who would know more about the engine than the manufacturer? Multi-grade oils did exist, but single grade oils were most common in heavy duty engines which are usually used at maximum output for most of their lives. The engines were designed to use that grade of oil.... the same as the most modern light vehicle engines are designed to use more exotic grades like 0w-40 and such. You wouldn't put 40w in them...and if you used 5W30 in a 2 stroke Detroit, it would not last very long.
  13. Did it come from a dairy farm?
  14. Stick with straight 20 grade in winter and 30 in summer. edit: the temps that you are running in aren’t that cold, you could use 30W all year… but keep a magnetic heater handy in case you have to run when you get one of those nasty western cold snaps.
  15. Snerd has always been on The Bash Board. The Bash Board - The Bash board (allthingsagriculture.com)
  16. Ok, I am raking what you’re swathing… the bellcrank doesn’t hold it in park. That job is only done by the spring under the range cover. There were a couple of park lock updates, so some raise a bit without force, and some require a good pull. Sometimes the updates got done incompletely, which makes some of them feel strange.
  17. Be sure that the bellcrank on the shouldered bolt and the fixed length link is well lubricated and with no corrosion first. You can remove the bolt, clean it and grease it when in park. the only adjustment is the link between the shift lever actuating arm and the bellcrank. It is the easiest of all adjustments in this setup. Be sure that it goes fully over center evenly in both directions by adjusting the link between both ball joints.
  18. ...still better than NAPA or baldwin.. haha
  19. Any engine can make seriously high numbers for a short burst. Keeping it together for hours, not minutes is the key.
  20. Dang! Well, maybe I got lucky on that green weenie. I'll be sure to say something to my supplier, and if I do another one, I will check it! Another side note though, Caterpillar did studies on piston rings in the lab and found that they progressively work their ways around the bore over hours of run time. They should be staggered at even intervals though, and I was taught in trade school to avoid lining any up with the piston pin.
  21. No worries. I have to stop and think about those before typing too.
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