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IHRedRyan

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Everything posted by IHRedRyan

  1. It was a diesel - my understanding is that a Custom only had one set of hydraulic remotes? if that is correct then it wasn't a custom - he remembers it having two remotes for sure.
  2. My grandpa turning 90 this summer and trying to track down his last tractor. International 856 with Yellow EasyOn Loader , Extra Headlights mounted on side of hood (like they were on early clamshell fender 806s), Grey Toolbox mounted low below loader bracket on TA side of tractor. Tractor was sold to Bryan's Farm Equipment is Puslinch, Ontario in Summer of 2001 - they don't have any paperwork or records. Unfortunately don't have any paper work of our own - so no serial number. Could have gone anywhere in 20 years - any information greatly appreciated ... it's a long shot.
  3. McCormick No. 50 - Picture from 1960 Farmer's catalogue
  4. Just outside of Waterloo, Ontario ... where the Blackberry Smartphone was invented. That was the city's claim to fame for many years ... it doesn't come up so much now that they've gone down the gutter.
  5. I would ask again or maybe this thread could be moved over in the General Forum, probably catch more attention and get more help over there.
  6. For anyone interested, i wanted to share a story my grandpa (89 years young) told me this week after hearing of Walter Gretzky's passing. As the story goes Wayne Gretzky had a humble upbringing in Brantford Ontario, my mom's side of the family has farmed just North-West of there for generations. Mr. and Mrs. Gretzky Sr. (Walter's parents) had a 10 acre farm just outside of town and used to buy hay from my great grandpa. In the late 1940s my grandpa can remember taking a load of loose hay over to their place after supper with the Case Model C and a young Walter helping him unload it. He also remembers that at the time the Gretzkys had a Farmall A and he believes that was their only tractor. A few years later my grandpa had become an Imperial Oil Dealer (later became Esso) which he did on top of farming part time right up until the late 70s. (Sidenote: he had a few Loadstar fuel trucks throughout the years). He delivered furnace oil to the Gretzky farm for many years and would also fill up a 45 gallon drum every once and a while that Mr. Gretzky Sr. used as a bulk fuel tank for that Farmall A. He said that Walter was always a very friendly young man and he wishes he had a camera back then to capture some of these moments. R.I.P. Walter Gretzky 1938 - 2021
  7. Happy to report that i swapped in a different new breaker arm that i got through Napa and it fired right up and ran smooth. I suppose it could very well have been made in the same factory as the one i got from CIH but who knows, i guess i had a bad breaker arm. The little "pop" or "miss" in the exhaust (the reason I started this thread in the first place) has completely gone away. I adjusted the carb a bit more and am happy with how it's running. Thanks to everyone who chipped in advice.
  8. That's the one , even in Canada - i'll send you a PM
  9. Have looked high and low online to get my hands on a copy of the 1939 - 1985 identification guide. I think I'm about 15 years late to the party? So far only found one on Australian website. If the man himself or anyone can point me in right direction - would appreciate it, I'd like to have a copy.
  10. Ash should be okay for framing, beams, etc. There is definitely a surplus of it right now. All the ash dying off by the emerald ash borer these days can usually still produce good lumber. The critters make their home between the sapwood and bark typically leaving most of the tree's potential lumber unharmed, but still kills the tree. As long as the tree hasn't been standing dead for several years should be good to go - and pretty affordable. Only set back is ash is not very rot resistant so if being stored outside during the build definitely want to tarp up. Hemlock is a great outdoor wood and much more rot resistant so would be great for your siding etc. My two cents, Good luck
  11. If it it the choke spring it goes in this hole (circled in picture) in behind the lever. There should be a stainless steel ball that goes in on top of the spring and it aligns with an indentation on the back of the lever so it "clicks" in place and stays open. If this is the correct spring and you've lost the ball the correct size is a 3/16" diameter. To my knowledge nothing special about it as long as it's the correct size and i know you can get a package of 100 from a place like Fastenal for less than 10 bucks. Then you'll have 99 spares ...
  12. Looks awesome - very impressive. Will you share your technique?
  13. Thanks for advice guys. I'll let you know if I figure it out.
  14. I had adjusted them - i adjusted them to .020 when cam has them open as per my manual. Maybe angle of picture makes it look a bit wonky. I'll triple check them and replace the condenser.
  15. It was intact when running - then i gently pulled back the breaker arm to take a look at the contacts and the spring snapped. It's been very cold here and it's stored inside but not in a heated building.
  16. Haven't replaced the coil - existing one doesn't require resistor
  17. I did replace both sides of the contact set. I did not replace the condenser - the old breaker arm was physically broke (spring snapped) which is why I opted to replace it. But I figured the existing condenser would be okay. Are you saying that when you replace the contacts you should always replace the condenser too?
  18. Thanks for info on grease. Thinking about it now i'm wondering if i didn't tighten the little nut (circled in picture) enough - i fought with it for a while to get it to thread on to the little stud in such a tight space and now i can't remember if I ever tightened with a wrench ... stupid but i'd be okay if that's all it is Maybe it's not getting consistent connection with coil and that's causing problem. I got the new breaker arm right from CIH but i did note "made in china". I assume that's how they all are these days (except NOS of course) and other guys have had luck with them?
  19. I replaced the wires and distributor cap - i went to adjust the points and decided to replace the breaker arm as well. I put a set of new Autolite 3116 plugs in and tuned the carb a bit and the tractor ran better than it ever has... that was Saturday. Today i started it up and it ran good for ten minutes - i just let it sit in the driveway and warm up - then all the sudden it started running much worse than it ever has before. I took the rotor back off and inspected the points again - i turned the engine over a few times a noticed that i'm getting spark between the cam and the breaker arm , shouldn't the spark be between the points themselves ? Looking at my manual - it says to pack some "magneto grease" in the "back of the breaker arm rubbing block" I didn't do this when I installed the new one - what type of grease should I use and where exactly does it go ? I have attached short video of it running - sorry i didn't take longer one but I wanted to limp it back inside for fear that it would stop running.
  20. Thanks for replies, I figured it was a bit light for the job - i'll have to give some more though to a PTO splitter. It's an '55 300U with the clutch pedal setup that makes your calve burn after a while and it would be nice to have adequate hydraulic power for a regular splitter.. But alas the tractor has sentimental value and upgrading to something like a 504 Utility isn't in the budget anyway - it's very nimble in the bush and start's every time so i'll suck it up and make it work.
  21. I am trying to decide if the stock hydraulic system on my 300 Utility is strong enough for a 3 point wood splitter. It has the IH pump (not the Pesco). It's not something that would be used everyday by any means ... maybe 10 days a year to split wood for ourselves. We do usually split some good sized maple rounds (currently rent a splitter with independent engine) so I do want it to be able to handle a decent load. Looking for opinions and if other guys have had success running splitters. I have also considered a PTO powered splitter but there's barely any used ones around and they're understandably more expensive.
  22. I am pretty confident that Parts Catalog #PO-6 is the one you need J. Maybe someone has one and could confirm. There's one sitting on ebay now too - i'll respect the forum rules and won't post the link, i just googled "ih PO-6 book"
  23. I had a Mavic Pro from 2017-2019 with all the fancy features - wasn't using it enough so I sold it - but then I missed having a drone. Anyway - that's where I got my RC experience. I use IMovie too ... my get around on the music is googling "Youtube to Mp3" - search up a song on youtube and copy paste the link into one of these sites - it lets you download an mp3 for free. Youtube will spit back some songs that have copyrights - but if you youtube an instrumental cover it usually lets you post it without issue. This is the site I use .. some others are a bit sketchy. https://ytmp3.cc/en13/ As for the MX ... one of the newer pieces or iron on the farm so I don't think it'll be going anywhere anytime soon. (My uncle's not mine anyway ) Pair of 1486s have been the workhorses for years - the MX110 and MXU135 have taken the load off their shoulders somewhat... 886 and pair of 806s do the small jobs - older restored stuff around just for fun. Restored 1466 Blackstripe is my uncle's baby - never sees the winter but have used it to plant beans a few years. Oh... and green combine gets the job done... has been around for years and was the right price at the right time.
  24. In my opinion... Depends what you're planning on using it for. I was a cabinet maker for several years and the hand held routers were always very handy for relatively small roundovers, chamfers etc. These light duty tasks can be done with a medium price bit and last quite a while. If you're planning to try to use it for cutting dados/ rabbits then I would go with a top quality bit to give your router a fighting chance - you'd have to take it slow with pretty shallow passes even still. We had several of those sets at the shop where i worked and most of them were never used... A couple different sizes of roundover , a chamfer, and flush trims were just about all your ever needed (we cut dados etc. on a designated table saw).
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