MT Matt

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  1. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    There are a few types of rollover plows. Some roll like a barrel so it looks like two plows on top of each other. Some setups had one plow for each wheel. One would be dropped in going one direction while the other side was up. When you turned around, the other side was dropped in. This is what I bought for my Cub. Basically left and right hand plows that mount on the tractor. McCormick had another type that I’d like to have some day. It was a #39 “tumble bug” plow. It rolled forward at the end of the field when you turned around. It was a two bottom and for an M sized tractor. If you search on YouTube for McCormick #39, there are a few videos of one.
  2. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Neat tomahawk Gary! Even neater that it is family made. So the “wide-load” Cub sold for $900. I have a friend who sort of wanted it and I told him I’d buy the cultivator off it if he bought it. But it went for a little more then he wanted to give. So I just thought the tractor just went off to Neverland like any other auction. Not so. Lol. There is a group of “coffee shop” retired guys who meet at a local restaurant on a daily basis. Dad was a part of this group and so I was adopted into the group when I moved home. The auction was a main topic lately and most of the group went to preview the auction. I went to the 10 am “coffee session” today before going to the auction site to pick up what I bought. I found out that a different member bought the Cub and he also wanted the bin of Cub parts that contained the two-way plow I bought. So I outbid him for that, which was kind of funny in itself since none of us knew we were bidding against each other. If it would have been a regular auction, we all would have worked together on it. So I helped roll the Cub onto his trailer and it is safely home in St. Regis now. Just not at my farm. I don’t think Curt really wants the cultivator setup and I might be able to trade him my two-way plow for it, we will discuss that more eventually. He just wanted the Cub because he had one in the past, sold it and wanted another to fix up for the enjoyment of it. And that is the story of an IH tractor on a Montana farm!
  3. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Lol. Good eye Gary! I couldn’t figure out why that data plate didn’t match the other Cub data plates I have seen. I thought maybe because it was an early plate it was a little different. Nope, just me not seeing what I saw. Haha. Dont let anyone tell you your eyes are slipping. Maybe I should start wearing glasses! I wish I could ask Dad to see if he knew your brother Bill. Lots of things I wish I could ask him. One other thing about that sale, they also have a two way plow for the Cub plus some other Cub things tossed in big tote on a pallet. I’d say that will go cheap and maybe find my farm. If nothing else, the plow set-up could be used on my Cub.
  4. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Sorry I can’t add to the welding theme. If I weld I’m pleased if the two items stick together when I’m done. I ran across something today that was interesting and an IH tractor on a Montana farm. There is a nearby nursery going out of business after 60 years and they are selling all of their equipment. A friend of mine wanted to preview the sale and asked me to tag along. Surprisingly there is very little old equipment but there was one gem in the lot I thought. There was a 1947 Cub there, serial #718. It was the first tractor on their farm. It was setup for cultivation, VERY wide cultivation. I didn’t get to ask for what specific crop. I’m not sure if the pins on the front axel were used or if just the clamps to slide the front wheels out that far. Or even if those are standard axels to get that much reach. You can see how far out the normal pin holes were. A wide stance is an understatement! Each rear axel has extensions also. They look factory made but are they IH? It might be a kit as the right extension is longer then the left but the left side is set out the same distance from the transmission with the additional gear box in the next picture. This was also unique. This is a hi/low gear I was told by the head maintenance guy who had been there 30 years. Flip the lever to change the speed. The normal Cub gear shifter was in the usual place. So I guess this gave it 2x the speed choices. I’d like to know what the “B” meant on the plate. I think J meant the type of clutch plate installed but maybe I can find those things out. I just thought I’d share this interesting tractor. Maybe if it went cheap enough I’d think about bidding on it but I already have a Cub here on the farm. I’m more interested in a cultipacker they had. I’ll keep an eye on the price and report back of what it goes for if anyone is interested. They also had IH 966 high crop and 100 hydro tractors. I didn’t think to take a picture of those. The rest of their fleet was green.
  5. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Happy Thanksgiving to all! My children flew in this afternoon from Missouri so I’ll be having turkey on Saturday instead. Delta Dirt, I’m not the same person as Dia480. I’m over on the west side of Montana.
  6. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Funny but so true Gary! We saw many, many instances like that. Very hard to change a mindset. Especially when they didn’t work for it and have some skin in the game. It was free and if they waited long enough, more free would show up. And then they sold it and went back to the old way.
  7. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    On the threshing machines, USAid provided those for the most part and although in theory they worked as intended, they were generally “claimed” by the head of the village or the head of the area, sometimes the Ag agent himself. Then it wouldn’t be used by the general population but only the “owner” and his family. Lots of corruption as we know or describe it but that was the way of life there. Just accepted. Saw the same situation with solar powered wells we installed with privious rotations. One guy claimed the well for his use or you would see the solar panels spread out across the village running lights in mud huts because the well didn’t “work” anymore. Sometimes the thresher wasn’t used because it took a tractor and fuel to run it. I saw one sitting near a field while guys threshed grain by hand with flails on the ground. No fuel was the reason. I think it was too far of a technological leap from what they were used to and able to support. That’s why I tried to introduce the next step in technology, going to modern day from Stone Age was too much. I just hope it mattered and made a difference. One man lost his life and several were hurt in our group. There were so many variables that come into play there that had little to do with farming for our unit.
  8. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Thank you Gary for this thread and all of these years of information. Also, tell your son thank you for serving. I’m a little late for Veterans Day also. Your Afghanistan pictures reminded me of my time there in 2010-11. Life is very primitive over there once you get away from a larger city. I was based in Jalalabad, which is in the NW area. I was part of an Agriculture Development Team from Missouri. I was part of the 4th rotation. We worked with what was our equivalent of a county Ag extension agent. We tried to introduce methods to improve their Ag practices. My contribution that I thought might make a difference was making scythes for each Ag agent in the province. They weren’t the best example as the materials were pretty poor over there but they worked and hopefully the locals could improve on them. We also showed videos to the agents of how to stand and harvest small grains with them. The norm over there was crawling around on their knees with a hand sickle. I did get a real scythe donated from a company here in the states but it showed up right after I left. I hope someone put it to good use. Anyways, thanks to all who have served. We did lose one from our small group to an IED also. It’s split the HMMV in half. After that, those were parked and we went in larger trucks with better protection. Salute to all of those lost in any war protecting our great county. Freedom isn’t free! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸
  9. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    The photo of the shocks as far as you can see is just astounding! Growing up, Dad did a little oats through his threshing machine so I’ve set a few bundles into shocks but NEVER could imagine how much work went into setting that field! As close as they are set and how tall the bundles are also means there was more then just an average harvest that year. Do you think all were set by hand or did they have a type of auto-shocker? The last photo of the straw pile is also something to behold! Here is a pic I have that must be Dads first harvest on his first farm in Minnesota. It says June 66 but it had to be from Aug/Sept 1965 and then the film was finally developed in 1966. The 1939 F-20 is still in the family, my sister has it. Not sure who’s thresher that was, Dad bought a Case later in about 1977 or so. The above pic is from around 1980 in Mn. He would turn the horses into the pile late in the fall and they would eat on it through the winter I remember a hole big enough in the pile that five horses could fit in it. My job in the spring was to haul what was left of the pile to the fields with the spreader. This is the machine as it set for the auction sale in 1992. This was Dad and his 47 Dodge. He didn’t let it go on the sale and I have this truck in a shed here on the farm. This F-20 went. I’m standing in the background. He had a lot of equipment from this time period on that sale. He wasn’t real happy about the results, he thought it would go higher but I suppose everyone does when they sell. Gary, the picture of your WD-9 pulling the grain drill reminded me of this photo when I was little. I had Dad’s mechanic hat on, I must have been 2 years old or so. I won’t get a “hat discussion” started as I’ve read about your poka dot hat and the striped hat heated debate here! Lol This WD-9 must have been my Uncle Leonard’s, Dad’s youngest brother. Dad had a 650 IH at the same time. They tried to farm together in the early 70s but as most things involving relatives, it didn’t work out for them. Dad had his first auction sale in 1975 I believe and got a good price on his equipment. He then went full into his mechanic shop and just farmed with small equipment on the side. Gary, farming over 3000 acres is just beyond comprehension for me. How long would it take to get the planting done? Did you hire out the combining? Sorry for so many questions but your farming history is a great story!
  10. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Wow Gary, what a great synapses of your family’s farming history! That’s amazing to have photographs from each time period of equipment. Thanks for sharing. How many acres did you run with your equipment at your highest? Being able to plow 100 acres in a day is pretty impressive for steam equipment. Any equipment I’d say, that’s getting it done.
  11. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Thanks Sledgehammer, I like the view here much better then where I was at in Missouri for the last 25 years! 664, I did a little research and I have a #70 plow. The difference between it and a #60 are the axels. The 70 are on top of the beam for more clearance and the 60 are below.
  12. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Ray, I could be completely wrong. If you say it looks like a 70 plow, that’s likely what it is then. It has trip bottoms if that helps ID it. It has a lot more clearance then the Case plow but for what I do, the Case worked perfectly. Delta Dirt, no GPS but Dad trained me well. Pick a spot in the distance and don’t look away from it until you get there. With the sidehills and different soil types in the field, my furrow straightness will creep a little after several rounds.
  13. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    This week I finished up the last job of the year and plowed the oat field. We finally had enough rain. I opened up the field with my IH 60 plow. It’s pretty well worn out but with the hills in the field, I knew I could pull three bottoms with the 560. This is looking west and only about half of the field is visible. I picked a tree on the horizon and aimed for it to keep a straight line. This field is about 18 acres. No job is complete without a selfie to prove you did it right? 😎 There is a lot of sand in the soil so the plow scours very nicely. This plow needs the wear surfaces replaced but instead of doing that, I found a Case 4 bottom plow with new cutting edges for $300 which I thought was a good deal. I just didn’t know how the tractor would handle it on my hills. Well I didn’t have anything to worry about, it pulled just the same as the old plow! Amazing what new edges and a properly set up plow will do! I plowed mostly in 2nd high TA but tried it in 3rd and the 560 was able to pull the Case plow just fine. But that’s pretty fast and the dirt just flings out of the plow! This is looking east from the other end. There were four Tamerack stumps still in the ground in the area just in front of the tractor which is a real pain. One had rotted enough to come out of the ground so only three are left. I guess I should dig around them and cut them off below plow depth. Why they were not dug out I don’t know when the rest of the field was cleared. And to make sure all of the plows had their chance, I hooked the H to the little JD 2 bottom trip plow. I made several rounds on a short section just for the fun of it. It was slow going but the H was able to handle it. I sure wouldn’t want to have to turn under 80 acres with this setup! Back to the starting point but with the work all done. Plowing is my favorite job, it’s a smooth ride and cool temperatures make it comfortable. Professor, did you plow like this on your farm or was it only with a disk plow? Work the fields in the fall or just in the spring before planting? You had a much larger operation then my little piddly farm but I enjoy it. Thanks for riding along with my IH tractors on a Montana farm!
  14. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Nice toy conversion! He will run the rest of the paint off it I’m sure. Well to add to the grease gun - elk hypothesis, they do attract elk but since the elk are still attracted, there is the danger of hunting season. My step-brother drew a cow tag for my district and hasn’t shot an elk in 23 years. Dad placed a small hunting shack on the edge of the field years ago and is the center of many hunting stories. Rich went to the shack at 4:30 am, safe light was about 8 am so he was a little eager I’d say. At 8:15 he called me and said to bring the tractor! The 15 cows/yearlings who devestated my field all summer were on the golf course next to my house over night. They then walked up the hill, right through the big field at daylight to head for the woods. And right past the hunting shack! Rich had an easy 75 yard shot and dumped a big cow right in the middle of the field. Loaded her in the bucket and is now hanging. Tomorrow we will have fresh tenderloin for lunch!! And a lot of meat in the freezer. I’ll let you guys know how oat fed elk tastes. So I guess I’ll have to take a small grease gun to the hunting shack to keep the attraction up for next year! 😎. I’m sure the 18 acres of oats I’ll plant won’t mean anything. I wonder what the grease gun effect is on turkeys? What do you think Professor?
  15. MT Matt

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Great series of pictures Gary! Glad you rescued the grease guns and gave them a proper shelf to rest on. The bison pictures are frame worthy. Dont get me started on feeding elk oats. 15 of them critters took a toll on my 18 acre field. I tried to save 5 acres of the best growth to combine. I cut the rest for hay as soon as it turned into the milk stage. In five days they ate that 5 acres and stripped just the heads leaving the stalks that they didn’t trample. I figured I went from 50-60 bushels per acre to 10. I counted 45-50 kernels per stalk before they ate it. I was lucky to find five on a stalk after they were done. I guess next year I’ll have to sleep in the field to keep them from eating it all.