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The Other Greg

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  1. At this point I'd look at anything that could haul a water tank safely.
  2. I just attended a truck show today and saw one of these 1850B's with power steering- wish I took a pic for you. I have been looking for a Cargostar with air, manual and diesel for a long time now. You are indeed a lucky chap! Greg
  3. My search for a water/dump truck continues...we are literally running out of water as our well has failed and the water man is getting all of my money. Its very frustrating knowing I can drive a "big truck" CDL and can buy water for 3 bucks a thousand gallons in town but cannot afford a late model or find a decent older truck to buy or trade for. I have narrowed my search down to a Cargostar 1850B. Reason being, they seem like the most versatile trucks. Originally I was a loadstar fan but have moved to the Cargostar series. I like the idea of a Perkins or IH DT series diesel paired with airbrakes and either an Allison auto or standard tranny. I think the best configuration for me now would be a dump body as I will use it for both a slide in poly water tank AND hauling dirt. I have been trawling facebook marketplace, craigslist, and auction sites. I find pictures of trucks that have sold in 2012! This is not helpful. Not much out there...am I missing something? Id prefer a private sale and will travel to pickup. Any suggestions would be helpful. Greg
  4. Thanks very much for all of the super informative responses for this post. I know that the owner says the truck starts and runs like a top. the major concern is the lack of a functional front brake system (juice) and a way to verify fullness and fill (stuck vent) the propane tank.
  5. Thanks for the help so far you guys are great! So things to think about.. Needed (for propane to gas conversion): a carb, elec. fuel pump, gasser distributor, gas tank lines etc. Not needed: Intake manifold How can I identify if the engine has the factory propane and indeed has a high comp ratio? Codes on the outside? Glovebox card? Also: How hard is installing a new front brake supply line? owner says he blew it (rust) and truck has no brakes currently.
  6. Here are engine pictures- unsure of mileage, engine type/size or condition. What do I have here? Could you propane power experts walk me through what is what? Thanks Greg
  7. VIN engine code for space #8 is "B" maybe that's a 404?
  8. I dont have any photos of the engine yet perhaps soon. OG
  9. Hello, I am still searching for a truck for my property to haul water and dump runs local etc. Every month or so. I have run into a 1981 S1600 in acceptable "pre beater" condition that runs on propane for under $1000. I have yet to take a look as it is under snow but it has a 23,000 GVW, flat bed dump, 5-2 trans, and I think a 346 engine. The front brakes have blown a line and needs to be repaired, there is typical rust in rockers and was at one time a lumber yard delivery truck. Drivers rockers are rotten and will need replacing- any sources for these?- have MiG ready to weld. The sticky part is the propane. The tank drain is stuck- not allowing the tank to be refilled. I know nothing about propane powered vehicles and need more information here from the experts. I have read about performing a propane back to gasoline conversion. My local IH guy says "big bucks" but he always says that. I am thinking also of perhaps an injection vs carburetor upgrade? Maybe even a DT conversion- from a former school bus? I dont know. Not looking for a huge complicated and expensive project but have mechanical skill to perform intake manifold, wiring and engine swap if necessary. Opinions and information please! Many Thanks. Other Greg,
  10. So here we are again. I wanted to update. I have been up and back down the slippery slope of what will suit my needs as a water tanker and have decided the best course of action is to buy a water tanker! OK let me explain. I have recently been looking for the S series International as well as FL series Freightliners all diesel. What I do like is that they are younger and parts are plentiful. What I dont like is the same- they are not as stylish and cool as a vintage Loadstar. So I have narrowed my search to the vintage fire tanker side of these machines. I like how they are mated with a tank and engine/brake combination that is acceptable and dialed in for that specific vehicle. Although I am wary of the reliability of brakes and engine from a track that old. Also firetrucks spend all their years indoors and coddled and maintained and serviced regularly. I think for the 1960's model loadstars there are a few engine combinations, does a 300 cid fit that bill? My question to the group is a bit of a travesty for the purists. I have a line on a very low mileage 130,000 mile cat diesel 3126 engine 240 HP from a Freightliner school bus. Its a runner that can be had cheap with all the trimmings including radiator and even front axle if i want it. Is it realistic to swap this engine system and possibly a modern transmission and rear end into a 1960's Loadstar? I do like the ease of adjusting an all mechanical gasoline engine, but fear it will be a gas pig and may not have enough reliable power both starting and stopping. I suppose one could buy an airbrake and diesel bus, and place all Loadstar cab and chassis bits upon said bus and make it a "Freightstar" What do you all think. Have I made you all as my enimies for suggesting such a thing? be kind I'm still a newbie here.
  11. So heres an oddity. I came across an international pickup truck circa 1951 which had been transformed as a kit option by International into a one ton dually dump truck. has anyone else heard of this option? Also the very nice older gent who is the 2nd owner- mentioned it needs brake work- he has all the bits and pieces for it but cannot find someone to perform the work for him. Is this a problem. I am a good wrench but is there something with these that is challenging? Thanks!
  12. Hi Everyone, Ironically enough, I have a cousin with the same first and last name as me, so in my family, I am called "Other Greg", looks it is the same here (first name only). So here is my introduction. I am a 40 year old guy with a background in art- specifically sculpture. Up until 3 years ago I was a college prof. but gave it up to be a stay at home Dad. I have a mechanical bent and can with time can fix most things which is handy as well as a curse. Last year, my wife, twin daughters, and I just recently moved into an older home (1923) in the country it is a fixer upper and needs almost everything. I have replaced all the plumbing, all the waste/sewer lines, insulation, electrical...well you get the idea. Going into the deal we knew we had a hand dug well and it was less than productive. It seems even that was over exaggerated- I have a 4000 gallon water tank also, and have been paying for water quite steadily for months now. It is eating into our budget quite rapidly. What brings me to the group. I have been researching trucks that can carry water and maybe also sand and fill. I have looked at Federal, Mack, White and have come to realize I like the Internationals very much. I have come across a few Loadstars 1600-1800 from 1950's- 1970's that I like very much for their classic lines but modern brakes. I have also fallen in love with a very nice KB-10 dump online but in speaking with the owner realized it may be too "elderly" for my needs. I plan to use a 1500 gallon poly tank as a slide in or frame mount depending on the truck I buy. I love also the idea of an older truck. They just look nicer! Easy to work on! Something that is functionally basic and has some stylish lines (hence the KB series) but I also want something that is safe. The KB series has a brake system from what I gather is a bit antiquated and fades more readily than a more modern hydraulic setup, which in turn isn't as good as air. I have also been looking at old auction NY state trucks with diesel and hydro brakes, but cost is also a major factor. Its a hard sell I know-we are up against a rock and hard place right now and running out of water regularly. I possess a CDL and can drive a double clutch manual transmission as well. I was thinking of buying a dump as it would be handy for sand delivery here to bring up a slope (many many yards of sand) and slide in a 1500 gallon tank for the monthly water pickup. Just wondering what sort of trucks the group can recommend as well as the issues with each of them. Thanks for adding me to the group, The Other Greg
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