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KWRB

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KWRB last won the day on May 3 2018

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About KWRB

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    Advanced Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central NY
  • Interests
    Into old tech of any kind, and patent history

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  1. If I owned that tractor I'd display it in the bedroom, thus making it the workshop anyway!
  2. The Catalina!!!! Obviously. And it has to land on water. I could check another one off the list.
  3. Chris, do you have to know of any dealers down here in Oswego county?
  4. I'm like you. Peace of mind has value. I'm sure the electricians are right, but overdesign and sleep well at night is my philosophy
  5. No I couldn't -or maybe I could have, but I assumed instead it was some cool code word. I thought it was some sort of old slang I didn't know... Like binder. You wouldn't believe how long it took before I finally asked what the heck everyone was referring to when I kept hearing about "binders". Now, I guess I'm shellshocked by the whole experience and I assume there's this whole old guy lingo that I don't know!
  6. at the risk of sounding ignorant, what does solder mean?
  7. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/phoenix-shot-tower Here are some pictures of a shot tower in Baltimore. I got sucked into a vortex yesterday -thanks guys. Anyway, it looks like there's a ratcheting-like mechanism in tracks on either side there. So, I assumed they were the tracks in which a crucible was lifted to the top. Then, I read they poured through a sieve. That presumably creates precise drops that result in precisely sized shot. I couldn't help but wonder how precise they were able to achieve. THEN.... I got to wondering how they make shot today... see what I mean about being stuck in a vortex?
  8. That's great. I have had the opportunity to hold wild birds a few times in my life. It's always such a treat. The greatest was a hummingbird. I could live to be 200 and never have that chance again.
  9. Hey! Thanks for starting this topic. I have no idea who would have been the local IH dealer here in the 40's and 50's, and I always hope to see a decal with a place name I know.
  10. It's extra funny because you said "spanners", reinforcing that you're not American and thus some things transcend borders.
  11. KWRB

    Wake Up Call

    Thanks; I appreciate it. It is what it is though. My life was so changed by it, that I can say for sure that my life would be nothing like it is, had he not died when he did. Everything was affected from my education to my career to my family life and my personality. However, my life is good so I've made peace with it because the outcome in the end everything it affected turned out okay. Some parts of my life truly silver linings. For example, I don't work myself to death, because I don't know how long I have and I want to live while I'm alive. My dad was a workaholic. Addicted to the paycheck and browbeaten by the job (read: people). I had a great grandpa make it to 100 from the same branch of the family tree, so it's a total crapshoot where (when) I'll end up. Needless to say that the between the 47 year old and the 100 year old, one was super high stressed and lived on a steady diet of Coke, Pop Tarts and Old Golds, and one didn't.
  12. I think we might be saying the same thing. Living or not has absolutely nothing to do with heat transfer; if one object is warmer than another and they're in contact, there's a delta t and so there's heat transfer. The rate of that heat transfer (cold air taking heat off a warming engine block for example) is affected by circulation of a fluid. That's basic heat transfer. The point where "speed" ceases to increase heat transfer in a fluid-over-a-solid is a function of Reynolds number, which is in turn a function of density, viscosity and geometry, in addition to velocity. And this last one is kind of semantic and splitting hairs, but the heat transfer between the solid surface (engine block) and the fluid is conduction. The movement of warm fluid away and being replaced by cooler fluid in one space, that's convection. I had an awesome Heat Transfer textbook and I really want to scan illustrations that show this, but I lent it out and I don't know who has it! 😖 I promise this is true. I'm kind of passionate about this stuff. I studied it, I worked in a heat transfer research lab and spent the first large chunk of my career in HVAC product engineering.
  13. Wind effects the rate of heat transfer through conduction at the surface. Think of it this way: If there's a temperature difference between say, the engine block and the air, then the heat will travel from the warmer to the colder. the rate of heat transfer is proportional to the temperature difference. In other words, heat will leave a 75 degree cast iron block at a greater rate in 0 degree air than it will in 20 degree air. However, all the air is not at the same temperature. If the fluid (air or water) is still, then the fluid immediately at the surface will be slightly warmer than the rest of the air, thus slowing the rate of heat transfer out of the block. as the engine block sends heat into the air immediately at the surface, it will rise away. This is a passive process. If that air if sufficiently forcibly (actively) circulated, then the air at the surface of the engine block will effectively be the same temperature as the atmospheric air (colder), increasing the delta-T, temperature difference and increasing the rate of heat transfer. As for your comment about humans, it is the same. Say it's a 90 degree day, and you're sitting still, the air that is actually in contact with your skin will be much warmer than the 90 degree atmospheric air. It'll be closer to your body temperature meaning a relatively small delta-T (temp difference) and thus a lower rate of heat transfer. if the wind is blowing, that surface air is being removed as it is warmed by your skin, to so delta-T is now body temp minus atmospheric temp. As yet another example, if air circulation didn't matter, then heat exchangers would not have fans.
  14. ...Perhaps also tall enough to provide a long enough drop to cool and harden. Then water at the bottom. Pure speculation, but that's what I'd try.
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