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Willie B

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Everything posted by Willie B

  1. Willie B

    PTO ?

    Do you have a big goiter sticking out the back the PTO shaft originates from? Hydraulic PTOs would turn some until engaged.
  2. Or, there are older transformer welders that'll do steel very well, and a skilled weldor can weld aluminum. They are power hungry, be sure to have plenty of power available. Be careful not to buy a three phase machine if you don't have three phase. Keep your eye open for a Miller Dialarc 250HF, or a Lincoln Idealarc 250 HF? You want a water cooled torch.
  3. Divide TIG welders into two categories: Steel only, buy an old welder based on a transformer. I had a Dialarc 250 HF. You could TIG steel with a welder you likely already have. Any DC welder can TIG steel. You'd have to scratch start. A pedal start TIG for steel needs HF. HF is an additional high voltage, high frequency circuit presented simultaneous to the welding current. In steel welds, it gets the arc started, in aluminum welds it stabilizes the AC arc throughout the weld process. Until 1970 you would have been happy with the same good quality welder you welded structural steel on DC, or flat welded steel horizontal with AC. In 1970 helium got scarce. There was helium, but cost dictated you didn't use it except in special occasions. Simple 60 HZ, sine wave, transformer welders were not as user friendly on argon, a gas derived from air. No risk we'll ever run out of it, but it doesn't behave like helium. Welder manufacturers have developed since 1970 better welders able to do what all TIG welders once did on helium. With argon shielding gas, and 60 cycle AC power, the arc dies each half cycle, (usually 1/2 of 60 HZ) 120 times a second it dies. An arc depends on ionized gas to conduct. When we weld aluminum, heat moves in the direction of electrons. Electrode negative starts ionization easily. Electrons build on the point of the tungsten electrode, concentrate, ionize gas & conduct to the work making heat. Aluminum instantly forms an oxide layer. This layer is a poor conductor of electricity, & melts at about twice the temperature of the aluminum it protects. We have to blast it away. The return trip for electrons (EP) sends electrons from the work to the tungsten. It starts from a bigger surface, from a poor conductor. Ionization is less effective. It only has 1/120 of a second to act, if the arc is delayed, it'll be ineffective. Square wave is the solution. AC switches so suddenly from EN to EP, ionization isn't interrupted. Cathodic etching is far more effective with square wave. Many square wave welders not needing 50% EP for cleaning do as much with 30% EP, sending less heat to the tungsten. This enables better alloys of tungsten that stay sharp. Adjusting frequency influences the width of the arc. You choose exactly the width needed to weld, reducing the size of the heat affected zone. Aluminum needs lots of BTU to weld. A boatload to start, then less as the workpiece gets hotter. This comes down to amperage & duty cycle. If you need to weld aluminum, not less than 200 amps 60 % duty cycle. I have a 280 amp @ 60% duty cycle. I'd sure love to have more than that.
  4. In 2013 I decided I needed TIG in my repertoire. I made expensive mistakes. I've owned three TIG machines, and would move to a fourth if cost didn't factor. I've made all the mistakes, I'll save you from some if you PM me an Email address.
  5. Willie B

    Women

    Gee, I don't think she has a purse. ?????
  6. My case backhoe described several pins as 2". In truth they were 1.973". Turn down a chrome pin by .027" you've earned your keep.
  7. Don't know what alternative starter you might want. I got another concept: Unwind the wire making up the windings in a starter, you will have little or no magnetic field. Connect that to batteries of correct voltage, the amperage will be outrageous! Wind it back up, magnetic impedance, or magnetic choke limits the amperage. Battery, through starter, back to battery is a series circuit. The physics of a series circuit is that there is 12 volts. Every point of resistance takes some voltage. A battery terminal connects to a battery, and a cable. Each terminal has at least two points of contact. resistance anywhere reduces voltage delivered to the starter. In the portion of the starter circuit we refer to as ground, we depend on the tractor components to conduct electricity. Each bolted joint in the path becomes an obstacle to electrons. A 12 volt starter likely tries to do its job on 10 volts. If a 12 volt starter tries to function on 10 volts magnetic field is reduced. Weak magnetic field means weak torque from the starter, less magnetic choke, less impedance, current skyrockets. As current rises, the electrical energy is not converted to magnetic field. It becomes heat energy. If I want a starter to work well I fix the points of resistance in the circuit, and ensure I have the biggest, healthiest battery I can fit. New heavy cables coated in Noalox before being crimped into the terminals, clean battery terminals, each contact surface addressed to conduct as best it can. Sometimes bolted castings aren't worth dismantling to clean the surfaces. Consider running a heavy cable from battery ground post to the starter frame. My 6 volt Farmall M starts reliably in all weather to zero. good connections makes it work.
  8. I just made pins for a Case Backhoe with 4140. It is hard, a challenge with HSS tooling. I wasn't able to cut it to length with the lathe, I used a Milwaukee hand held bandsaw. It took all the teeth off.
  9. TD7 weighs over 7 tons. D7 must be 20 ? tons.
  10. Boy, I'd like to know. I've a 1990 GMC Top Kick fire truck soon to add my 14' dump body to it. Cat 3208 10.6 litre with a bath fan turbo, next to no boost. Odometer reads 36000, pump hours 550. This doesn't add up to a lot of wear, but I presume it was started cold and flogged before oil pressure builds. heated storage is a factor, for better or worse.
  11. Willie B

    Dozerdoozy

    I thought it looked familiar! Much like my TD7G. Mine has Cummins of the same displacement as your IH. Not sure if there are subtle differences, minor if any. Add guards on the C frame to protect the angle hydraulic cylinders. Don't ask how I know. And, don't bother looking for good used angle cylinders.
  12. Willie B

    Making Loose Hay

    In my childhood My sister & I shared a horse. She rode it, I shoveled $hit, cut hay, piled hay, fed hay, & trucked water. Our father grew up on a farm. He already knew how. Much of the time someone had already mowed the hay, Other times we used a scythe. Drying, you'd imagine how it is done. The picking up was what amazed me. It got hand raked into small piles 6' diameter & 18" high. I was amazed that dad could fork a whole pile in one lift. He had a system. The forkfuls of hay were loaded on a flat trailer maybe 6x8. Four forks on the four corners, one in center. By the time he had piled on the trailer, it was 8' tall 12'wide. At home we had no hay mow. It got piled to shed weather. The stack was shaped like the trailer loads, but much higher, probably 16' tall. A small tarp kept rain & snow off the top.
  13. Willie B

    Making Loose Hay

    In my childhood My sister & I shared a horse. She rode it, I shoveled $hit, cut hay, piled hay, fed hay, & trucked water. Our father grew up on a farm. He already knew how. Much of the time someone had already mowed the hay, Other times we used a scythe. Drying, you'd imagine how it is done. The picking up was what amazed me. It got hand raked into small piles 6' diameter & 18" high. I was amazed that dad could fork a whole pile in one lift. He had a system. The forkfuls of hay were loaded on a flat trailer maybe 6x8. Four forks on the four corners, one in center. By the time he had piled on the trailer, it was 8' tall 12'wide. At home we had no hay mow. It got piled to shed weather. The stack was shaped like the trailer loads, but much higher, probably 16' tall. A small tarp kept rain & snow off the top.
  14. Yes, It can be done. It places the cost of a new 1966 plain Jane Mustang at about $45000. I could NOT do that. I remember lack of interest way back then! In the muscle car era, I only considered the Chrysler offerings serious contenders. I was thunder struck by a 1969 Plymouth Roadrunner owned by a family member a bit older than me. By 1974 I had lost out on A Jaguar XK120, and finally bought a 1968 Jaguar E Type roadster. These cars (lied) claimed similar horsepower, but they could take a corner! They weighed 2/3 what American muscle weighed. Sorry, Mustang was as exciting as the Mavericks my grandmother & the old lady next door had.
  15. I'm not sure, divided highway, I was looking elsewhere. I noticed only out of the corner of my eye, By the time I got my head swiveled enough I didn't get a real good look. Truck was old, as was the tractor, as it was IH & they don't hardly make them any more. Old Ford Mustangs seem more plentiful now than the year they were made. I know you can build one just from reproduction parts. My question is: "Why would you want to?" IH tractors seem to live forever. To me they seem as plentiful as when they were being produced. I'm astounded how many pre 1986 are in annual use in Hay & corn fields. One farm I know well was still using a Farmall M the grandfather bought new in 1939 until a few years ago. Of course these people refer to the new engine on the sawmill. The mill had a steam engine in 1928. They were trying unsuccessfully to saw one day, something kept failing on the engine. The old man climbed in his car, went to Crosby's (the IH dealer 2 miles away) When he returned, he announced "They'll deliver a new power unit after lunch". It was a gasoline/kerosene unit, looked like the front of a tractor of the day.
  16. Same road I last saw you I met an antique road tractor pulling a large "modern" IH tractor with a big spikey piece of hay equipment. I only got a glimpse. Might that have been you? I can't say the model, but I'd say 1980s, 140 or more HP.
  17. I fell in love with that truck at about age 17. USForest Service would take 60000 mile vehicles out of service & sell them by sealed bid auction. I had the money & wanted it! My dream truck had rusty rear fenders. Dad talked me out of bidding, it sat there maybe a year. Porcupines found their way in & out. Seats, tires hoses, brakes, shift knob, dash board, headliner & everything not made of steel got swallowed by these rodents! They sold it for scrap.
  18. Never seen the cab, but the most beautiful IH grill ever. I've always loved them. Local IH tractor dealer had several trucks, only one with that grill. Theirs was a blower body grain truck. It delivered grain to 70 farms locally for 25 years.
  19. I'm more familiar with US Forest Service. I always believed the bid specification read "truck, four wheels" They had so many Dodge 1/2 ton slant six, 2 wheel drive three speed step side, with the little shift knob it was amazing! The only local cool vehicle USFS ever had, I came to own. It was a full size Jeep Cherokee, 360 with four speed, 4.11 ratio. It was equipped with front winch & limited slip.Despite being a gas hog, it was a sweet driving vehicle.
  20. The local IH tractor dealer had a regular cab with dump body. I'm trying to remember, I feel it was a "71. After the annual volunteer fire company's annual fundraiser, Sunday morning is clean up. By afternoon in the day, the boys got into the beer just a bit. A truck pull ensued. After the Jeeps embarrassed themselves, the 3/4 ton pickups hooked up hitch to hitch. Most were mostly stock. Last to hook up was Elbert Crosby with the IH square corner. He never slipped a wheel. Nobody there could stop him. IH 345 V8. Not the biggest engine, but the toughest truck!
  21. Distract him a minute, it won't be a problem.
  22. Willie B

    Women

    I've tried to persuade Mrs B to use a tractor forever. When she deals with posies, and shrubs, she tries to tow a trailer with the JD lawn tractor. The trailer tongue is pretty battered from dozens of mishaps with backing up. She wanted a wagon, thought it'd be easier. Tongue on the wagon was broken before the Chinese tires stopped stinking. I have three loader tractors: A B275 A 385 and a Case 580K tractor/loader/backhoe. The 385 is least user friendly, but the only one she would try. She has operated it a few times each year, over the last 4 years. Today she looked at it parked; "I haven't seen that one before. Could I drive it" It sticks its bucket through the french doors in the living room once a week 9 months of the year.
  23. If it comes from Pilot Knob, you will not be disappointed.
  24. We might need a second duck if you're coming. Oh well, Mrs B makes a **** of a steak.
  25. For God's sake she's big enough for a meal.
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