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Delta Dirt

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Everything posted by Delta Dirt

  1. Fire in the fields-------while pulling the thresher with a steamer. That looks like he is pulling a full load in the top picture. How often did the old timers encounter a fire started by the steam engine smoke stack??? Have always wondered-----even realizing they had a screen in the smoke stack. ***** Sorta like that road grader. DD
  2. Thanks for acknowledging Pearl Harbor Day TwoStep. I had read a couple of posts relating to it-------thought I had paid tribute. My emoticon selection recently changed-------can no longer find a hand salute, thumbs up, nor Anerican flag. So here is a big wave of all three in honor of Pearl Harbor and our WWII vets. Thanks DD
  3. The Regulars pictured cross plowing cotton would be 1924-25 models. The two I have left on hand serial numbers identify as later models. ..........even though knowing my dad; either or both could very well have scavenged parts from the two in the picture. Daddy wasn't concerned about originality------and scavenging parts from the dead horse was a common practice back in those days. Both of mine have the enclosed steering gears up front (similar to the F20s).-------most likely added in later years. Both have been converted to L-P. Freight is no doubt a killer for most collectors to consider in moving any of my items up Nawth where most of the collectors reside. A couple of years ago---a near original, steel wheel Regular sold at a farm auction for $350. Weighing approx 4,000 lbs-------it would have brought that much or more at the scrap yard. And--------at that particular time I would have readily have bought the tractor if I had known it was for sale. Shortly thereafter-----my son Reb died unexpectedly. Not that Reb was a big proponent of rusty scrap iron-------but he did understand where it came from. Sorta opens up a new can of worms as the old codger and old scrap iron move forward. DD
  4. ------The howl of the side by side flathead V-8s would sound just about as good as a howling Detroit!!!! Music to my ears. Bet the buzz of the P-51s with the roar of the B24 in the background made somebody sleep good also?? Never heard of the Thorco-Ford either TwoStep-------thanks for another day of living and learning here at the Montana 1 room school house!!!! ***** The two Farmall Regulars pictured in Gary's picture a couple of posts back are not the same tractors that I have on hand. More comment later............ DD
  5. Sorry about the fire. I had seen a news item on it-----and looked the location of Denton up. That would hurt anywhere. ********** Not to be considered as an advertisement-----just seeking information. Who knows of a sales site or sales yard that specializes in older pre 1950s era farm equipment??? I have a yard full of primarily I-H related equipment dating back from my 1962 Loadstar with rollback----Farmall Ms----TD-14, on back to a couple of Farmall Regulars. All is rusty, dusty, and crusty-----(sorta like me!!!!). I am to the point that I need to clean up my shop yard before I catch the train outta here. Time to find it a new home-------even if it is the scrap yard. Anybody know of someone who specializes in the sale of this type equipment------please advise me if you do. DD (Avon, Ms 38723)
  6. Quotes: DD.........."to Triple-E" It's time to call the old professional in here-------no more guessing. Roger would you pull your calipers and give us some accurate dimensions on the smokstaks pictured. (we do know that Gary has photo shop capibility) ******** Serious machinist's question: Am afraid micrometers would be too small??? Where do you start measuring with Calipers vs. Micrometers???? DD
  7. Professor---- According to the internet-------Barbara was Standish's second wife-----married after first wife died. Lots of second and third spouses back in that day-------lots of early deaths (especially in childbirth). All interesting reading--------if I could just remember what I just read a few minutes ago. I may be confused-------Did you say this is your great, 8x greatest grandmother Barbara???? DD
  8. Mader----- The Mayflower arrived in 1620- today is 2021. Please excuse me if my mind is a little foggy on the dates and details-------but it's been a few years. I always "understood" that Roger Conant had come across on the Mayflower-------but in reading last night I have learned that Roger came across on a ship named "Anne" in 1623. (as did Standish's second wife) There is alot of info available on the internet concerning Roger Conant, Myles Standish, and George Soule. Roger Conant apparently wasn't at the first "Mayflower" Thanksgiving------ but with no more people than there were there for the first few years------damm good chance they all knew each other. Conant and Standish definitely knew each other--------being political enemies. (Conant: Puritan; Standish: Pilgrim) So-------it is only natural for Gary and myself to argue over polka dot caps, etc............. I used to know alot more on the subject-------but seem to have lost a big bag outta my rememberer somewhere along the way. DD
  9. Thanks for the M-F report. Lots of good reading there. Makes me want to see if I can dig out one of my old red M-F caps from the 70--80s. We swore by and swore at the Masseys-----but, still believe they were top of the line for the Delta area pre-rotary combine era. We used to kid the M-F dealers and factory boys that M-F did not stand for Massey-Ferguson!!!!!!! That black/gold color scheme looked good------give us a report on it if more information becomes known. DD
  10. Watching the Alabama-Auburn footsball game today-------haven't been able to pick him outta the crowd!!!!! Wondering where ol' High Cotton is. Haven't heard from you in a while. DD
  11. Burp!!!----------new recipe for finishing up left over dressing. Fried country fresh eggs over left over dressing--------delicious. Beats eggs over grits by a long shot. My neighbors chickens randomly make deposits in Wrangler's hay rack. Wrangler don't eat eggs------so leaves me figuring out ways to get them consumed. Worked out good!!!!! Hope to ship a dozen "Mississippi country fresh eggs" to Montana on next run by the AutoWagon. DD
  12. I haven't operated a combine since the mid 1980's--------(MF-750s). This was prior to GPS and current grain monitoring systems. I actually bought and installed an auxiliary grain loss monitor------seems like it was a "Watchdog" brand. Never was happy with the monitor-------but end result was it taught me alot about combining. I found the most reliable means of setting a combine (particularly forward speed) was checking for grain loss out the rear of the combine. Most combines (including rotaries----in most crops) will handle alot more feeding into the throat than they can thresh and process going out the tail end. Conversely------too slow in light yielding crops will result in excess loss from too much air. No substitute for checking the ground behind the combine. I used to have a 3x3 ft sq steel tray that I tossed under the combine to catch what was coming out the rear and to the ground. If I remember correctly-----in most soybeans 3 or 4 beans per sq ft equalled 1 bu/ac. After checking loss from rear of combine------pick the tray up and compare header loss/shatter. At $12---13/bu soybeans; you can learn alot in a hurry!!!!! Based on germination behind some of the newer model Red and Green machines can still use some fine tuning on their grain monitoring devices. Don't still have my old tray------but find myself still scratching behind alot of combines. Old habits are hard to break!!!!! Good luck. DD
  13. Hardtail and Hillbilly Thanks for your comments questioning the authenticity of the polka dot caps. I had held quiet on the matter-----thinking the guilty dog would bark??? I dunno------looks as if the guilty dog may have a hard core problem relative to these Easter Bunny caps???? DD
  14. No rain in forecast-------lots of uncovered cotton on the ground. Unusual picture for someone from here in the Delta area. Here------unginned cotton (as pictured) would have been unloaded into a "cotton house" so to be weatherproof. Difference in rain patterns for the area require different management practices. DD
  15. RPRU in Nebraska is really intriguing. I have Nebraska roots-------my great grampa was an early settler in Cass County (Nehawka) in 1856 after having been to the California Gold Rush and back home to their native Vermont. First trip to California was by steam ship and across the Isthmus of Panama-------they took a likening to Nebraska on their return (overland) trip to California and stuck a stake in the ground along Weeping Water Creek. Grampa Sheldon bought land here in Mississippi after making friends with some Mississippi boys during the Spanish American War and moved here 1911. Grand Isle and 2023 are along ways off for this old codger-----seriously doubt that I will make it. (getting to the drug store and grocery store has become an ordeal!!!) In case I do-------I will most likely be wearing a hat somewhat similar the ones pictured below. (and Gary and I will still be arguing over the "steam caps".) Anybody ever runs upon the GoldRush smoked beef sticks------give them a try. Sure are tasty!!! I just ran across them in a local hardware store-----need to pick up somemore. Delta Dirt Avon Ms 38723
  16. Don't worry too much about the hat misunderstanding TwoStep------ "IF" for some reason Roger and myself EVER ATTEND ANOTHER EASTER EGG HUNT-------we will do our best to acquire a PokaDot cap for the occasion!!!!! DD
  17. Sometime late last night on the western channel following Gunsmoke, "Wild West Chronicles" was featuring a show on Charles Russell (western artist) from Montana. I was familiar with Russell since We have discussed Charles Russell right here on the old codgers classroom------thanks to the Professor. Channel 364 on our satelite (Direct TV)------ I fully expected Bat Masterson to interview the Professor but they missed him-------hopefully next time???? DD
  18. Roger------ I dunno 'bout the Professor????? I have never worn overalls (spell ??)------but wuz just tellin the Missus that I thought I wuz gonna buy me a pair of "them overhauls" (as we call them down south here) for lounging around the house. Most of the boys what wear them "overhauls" down here wear the blue denim Big Smith brand. I think mine will be the blue stripe version---------just to show the Professor that I ain't the argumentative type and can go along with the crowd (when they iz right). DD
  19. -------one bottle of watermelon wine headed upriver to Minnesota!!!!!!!!!! Thanks Roger------I didn't know that I wuz missing on the class roll call. With those "offical certified" blue stripe engineer's hats on-------me and the "Booger Bear" both could pass as steam engineers!!!!! (well------near about) DD
  20. Steamer at work last weekend in Merced, California. (from Tony's thread-----Tractor parade in Merced, California) DD
  21. ------a lip smackin thumbs up to the B-B-Q grill!!!! Gonna post your picture of the steamer smoking meat on Gary's Red Tractors on Montana Farm thread. Don't know nuthing about steaming-------but can hang with the best on grilling (and blowing Blue Smoke!!!!) and hello to Bullwinkle------do you still pass through my area???. DD
  22. Tony------ Interest and intrigue is a two way street. Most likely we will have to catch up with each other in our "next life"--------seems like I have waited too late to travel and entertain (or restore and paint tractors------just gonna keep mine rusty and dusty so they won't look so out of place at the scrap yard!!!!!) Damm good thing my wife doesn't think of me as a tractor-------or I would have been scrapped out long ago. Where do you buy your Geritol-----send me a couple of gallons!!!!! There are a number of good old souls on this board that I would like to shake hands with-------and I am always interested in everybody's backyard. Too me-------learning about the people and their Dirt has always been one of the big features of this board. Hoping everybody conserves and takes care of the Dirt (wherever you are located)--------it's got to last for a long time. DD
  23. Well stated Mike!!!!!! We all laugh at how big and how slow the Corps can make a seemingly otherwise "overnight" project. More time and $$$$$$ spent studying the project than digging????-----Definitely a bureaucy at work nowadays. Fortunately------for the most part the end result is a "must have" for the entire nation. note: in no way should the above comments be interpreted as "political"--------just an observed statement of fact. Anson Sheldon, Jr. Certified General Appraiser Ms #GA-195 (inactive) DD
  24. Interesting report Art------started the gears turning again in my old and faded brain (78+ yrs age). Most every segment of the Ark, La, Ms Delta (which includes the "Bootheel of Mo and bottom lands of west Tn) carries some similar history behind it. One needs to keep in mind that geoligists say the Gulf of Mexico extended northward to Cape Giraudio (? spell) at one time------so all of us ol' slow talking flatlanders would have been under water at one time or another. Natural and man-made changes have emerged together to make the area what it is today. No doubt one small area drainage system seems somewhat dependent on other adjacent or nearby systems--------while the overriding dependence on flood control for the area rests with the mainline Mississippi River Levee systems. Numerous smaller levees and drainage tributaries snake through the landscape-------all draining toward the big River and onto the Gulf of Mexico. Drainage and flood control has always been the first concern here in the Delta basin------- with irrigation a secondary concern. Every day a hand shovel, backhoe, dragline, trackhoe, dredge, etc...... can be found working somewhere in an effort to improve somebody's drainage. The attached map illustrates the extent of the Mississippi River basin------considering the vast area, you can well imagine the number of drainage districts working in the background to drain excess surface water to the big ditch (River) draining the nation to the Gulf. No doubt flooding of this area during the past 1,000's of years have provided us with a collection of rich soils from all across the upper reaches of the basin. I swiped the quote "most fertile on the globe" from a quote of an old time surveyor's survey of my grandaddy's property dated 1914. So-------the urge to improve our drainage an flood control has been on the citizens minds since white man first settled the area. The first mainline Mississippi River Levee Boards began to become organized immediately after the Civil War. Most of the drainage districts coordinate through the local levee boards with the U.S. Corps of Engineers providing oversight and coordination to the Levee boards. No doubt--------a huge, huge project that will be never ending. One plus feature the flood control projects of the Corps management of the basin-------is high volume river transportation for our grain. Fact is------your story just touches the tip of the iceberg. Hoping everybody takes it in and gives it a bit of thought------thanks for posting. And-------thanks again to all of you boys that contributed to our fertile soils. (aka: Delta Dirt) DD
  25. "Palouse" who used to frequent RedPower posted pictures of a TD-14 that had been converted to a 471 Detroit. Palouse was from the Palouse region of the sate of Washington. I am with Big Bud-----thinking a 371 would be more inline with a WD-9. I ran a couple of 371's as irrigation power units back in the 70--80s. They were rated @ 70+/- hp @ 17--1800 rpm. The rated rpms on the 71 series will be in the 1800+/_ range (300+ rpm more than the original TD-9 or 14. 53 series Detroits speed range was approx 1,000 rpm higher. A wide selection of injector sizes offered a range of power output with all Detroits. They did operate best near their full rpm rating------not an engine to idle back much. They were very adaptable to transplant------or build around. Damm shame I have gotten too old to get anything accomplished anymore. I have access to two 371s and two 453s (all in various needs of overhaul)-------and always wanted to transplant a 471 into my 1943 model TD-14. We could do some swapping and long distance hauling and both be in business!!!! I built a hydrostatic drive ditcher tractor using a 453------very simple engines to work with. Very dependable------the 453s were rated @ 112 hp. All of those days are behind me now-------but I still love the "music" of the old two stroke Detroits. Good luck------keep us posted. Delta Dirt (Avon Ms. 38723)
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