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DOCTOR EVIL

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  1. Yep, it's cheaper from the very first spark of inspiration to create something new all the way to the end of the physical parts useful productive lifetime. Most cases no pattern change needed to make the " new casting", most times just a machining or tooling change makes any and all variations. As we all found out here, Change was something IH managed fairly well. And I well remember all the pain-in-the-neck engineers at other companies that randomly changed hundreds of parts because somebody wanted one simple function or feature modified. Most of those fiasco's involved electrical and electronic parts.
  2. There's an interesting TV show on Motor Trend TV, we get it via Direct TV, ENGINE MASTERS, three guys doing parts comparisons on ONE part at a time on a Super-Flo dyno to see what makes HP and what doesn't. They just did a show, "1000 HP Muffler Showdown" They buy all their stuff from Summit, they had one longer round stainless muffler that should quiet a 70 hp tractor, think it was $145. And they've done several other exhaust tests, single vs dual, how much a tailpipe increases hp from open headers. I was always a fan of the FARMALL 460 muffler on an H, SH, 300,350. The '39 H got repainted about late summer 1964, the old dented M muffler was replaced with a VHT White painted 460 muffler. That muffler got swapped onto the SH May of '68, still looking good, and not sure what exactly happened but it was sitting in the 2-stall tractor garage with the bottom busted out of it about mid-1980's, and a Stanley muffler on the tractor. It's got a 304 Stainless tubing straight pipe now since about 1995. The Stanley was too tall to get in/out the 7 ft high shop door, the straight pipe fits. I didn't think the barn doors were all that tall back on the farm, the mounted picker had to sit outside, the wagon elevator was too tall for the doors anywhere. But the 4010 had the full length extension on the stock muffler with the Deere rain cap, and it fit everywhere, and the 450 had a 2 ft extension on the stock IH M/SM/400/450 muffler, no rain cap, but needed the extension with the Kahne tractor cab.
  3. WOW!! a $400 muffler? I'm trying to remember what we put on 686/H86 for a factory muffler. Think it was a taller oval muffler, black high temp paint, and baffled inside. Not a fan of Stanley mufflers, got two stuffed in the corner of the shop I can't even get to right now, one from SH, one from M.
  4. ED - Everything we got from Elwood was a Spicer axle. It's funny, of the hundred or more people I knew working at FARMALL, probably only 15-20 I know where they eventually ended up, and my BOSS was one of that small group. About 1990 after FARMALL was all cleaned out and everything moved to Racine, I see his picture on the cover of PURCHASING MAGAZINE, special magazine for purchasing people, and he was was PURCHASING MANAGER at Spicer in Minnesota, the plant that made Elwood & IH's FWA axles.
  5. It wasn't an IH, but I'm not sure the IH mulcher was even an IH, but it was probably made at Canton Works. The Midwest Manufacturing Company in Ida Grove Iowa probably made the first plow harrows, they made a single harrow up to 5 & 6 bottom. Dad retired the fully mounted Fast Hitch 4-14 # 4F-43 plow spring of '67 and put a Midwest harrow on the Case 4-14 trailing plow. We didn't use it fall plowing just spring plowing but with duals mounted first pass with the disk after plowing with the harrow was silky smooth. Spring of '69 Dad traded plows for the 4010, 5-14 Case trailing plow, even widened the harrow and the 4010 was WAY down in 2nd & 3rd gear trying to pull it, so we dropped the 5th bottom off and could run 4th gear. After a "Good" tune-up, NOT what the dealer's Ace mechanic did, I could even plow in 5th gear, till the head gasket blew one Saturday morning. You had to watch your left turns on headlands, the harrows liked to reach out and grab the fences really tight. Not so much turning right. Changes in tillage styles probably caused them to fall out of favor more than anything. If you plowed our slightly clay soils a day or two too early in spring they formed brick bats you could barely break with a sledge hammer. With the plow harrow on the plow, and duals on the tractor discing the plowed ground first pass it was much much smoother. Much better seedbed, quicker germination most years. I drove by MIDWEST Manufacturing in Ida Grove, Iowa about exactly a year ago, They're still in business but not making ag related equipment anymore, making boat trailers and boat docks.
  6. Brother-in-law has a big arched roof barn like that one, big laminated beams. Totally clear span, no pillars or posts or beams. It sat empty for many years but Nephew started feeding a couple calves and they may have 8-10 by now. The roofing material seems to be exceeding the " Use by Date" on all of them.
  7. Yep! Believe it or not, Off-white shades fade. 935 is correct. Think 901 is correct on early & mid 1960's. Ken Updike wrote up a complete guide to what IH white was usec when for IH Cub Cadet.com, 901,902,935. I remember my '65 #70 Cub Cadet was supposed to be 901, the body shop paint supply shop here in Madison had NO recipe for mixing us a quart of 901.
  8. All the tractors are FARMALL's. Don't you let any JD B's join to slow everybody down? Saw a post on Facebook somebody wanted gears to speed his 520 I think it was up. Sounded like everything back of the crankshaft had to be taken apart and the shop in Ohio that made the gears charged 4-5 THOUSAND Dollars for everything. I like the idea you have several tractors pulling wagons with people sitting on lawn chairs in them. I haven't seen that on a tractor drive before but I hope the idea catches on. Looks like you had a great day for the cruise.
  9. Neighbor's brother had one for his farm truck, every afternoon about 6 PM he drove home, drove out their driveway, short downhill then a fairly long uphill that he'd shift into high gear just about the time he'd get to our barnyard, not sure if it was a 3-speed or 4-speed, but it sure chugged when it went by our place in high gear. I wore out two Ford 300-6's, first one with a Carter YF-1 carb, 2nd was first year EFI, first one was pretty gutless, 2nd was a tiny bit better. The first one was same HP as the 305 V-6, 2nd one was same as the 351. GMC built all the V-6's as a real truck engine. The BIG 478's, twin-6's, 702 cid, and the V-8 version, 637 cid were popular as irrigation engines in the southern states. The 637 cid was officially the largest displacement V-8 any GM division ever produced. The bored & stroked race engines didn't count.
  10. This is such a KEWL truck, firetruck nicely converted into a car or equipment truck, tilting bed with a cable winch to pull non-running stuff on board. And with only 23,000 miles nothing should be worn too bad. Guys that buy new $60,000 Ford pickups with the 7.3L gas engine and tow about the same gross weight as that truck should easily handle get 6-7 mpg and are happy as all get out! But THIS is really cool, PLENTY of style points. There won't be another truck like it where you take it. The '74? FleetStar single axle tractor I drove for about a year had a 478 cid gas V-8, straight 5-speed, and I don't EVER remember NOT having the 45 ft Advance Transportation trailer behind the tractor and normally always had something in it, it was 13-1/2 ft high, loads varied from 5000-6000# to 20,000#, and I got between 3 and 3-1/2 mpg and it never had a tune-up which I'm sure it needed. So gross weight was between 25,000# to 40,000# pushing a L-O-T of air. The '80 F-750 Ford with the 8.2L GM FUEL PINCHER diesel got between 7 and 8 mpg pulling the exact same trailer, same loads and same roads. But about every 3-4 months it had to go back into the shop and get tuned up to run on all 8 cylinders again. It was a nice truck to run when it was running right, but another fuel tank would have been nice, only had ONE 40-50 gallon tank. FleetStar had a pair of 50's which a pair of 70's would have been better.
  11. HA-HA! Your not the first person I've heard say this! Had a guy explain in intricate detail what a piece of junk Dad's new 8-ton EWC gear was. He towed it 20 miles home 55-60 mph and it trailed like a shadow.
  12. IH had a lease program for foremen, supervisors, and managers to lease a Scout of their choice every two years. There was a milage limit on them, but you could order out your totally loaded Scout or your bare bones model, or just pick one from dealer stock. Lots of Scouts put on the road with this program, way less monthly cost than making payments to a bank or credit union on a used car off a lot somewhere. You delt with the IH truck dealer in Davenport, made your loan with the credit union, and payroll took a small payment out of your weekly check. Most were pretty well loaded, 345, A/T, 4wd, tape stripes and those plaid seats, chrome wheels. I interviewed for a supervisor's position a day or two before the Big Strike ended, I was driving a rusty old Chevy LUV pickup to/from work, I would have been into a lease Scout as fast as I could. I worked enough hours during the strike that when IH paid me my cost of living bonus they didn't pay us during the strike to conserve cash, took me about a week or two to buy my 2 yr old '78 F-150. I'm not sure the wild plaid seats helped Scout's market share, my buddy bought a '79 Bronco, black with those Lazer stripes, red, orange, yellow, white 8-spoke wagon wheels, 351M and creeper lo 4-speed, manual hubs & t-case. I rode in that Bronco quite a bit and it had great seats, black cloth if I remember right. Black vinyl floor mats for sure. The Forman I worked with scheduling the gear machining dept in 1977 had a cabin out in the hills of Colorado, He'd drive his lease Scout out there twice a year and stay for a week. Was about 1200 miles each way, only gas & snack stops or bathroom stops allowed, but he'd drive straight thru.
  13. I post on a '60 to '66 GMC V-6 forum regularly, I posted the question there. There's a plain engine, then a Magnum engine later in production, Magnum had a bigger carb, and might have bigger ports to match bigger valves. They're quite the engine, pull like a locomotive at low RPM.
  14. I know way too many really good IH parts guys, and the owner/manager of my local NAPA store is a lazy SOB, tells you one thing you want to hear one day, next day denies ever saying it and maybe argues a little then just walks away. I've gone there 3 times, I go to O'Reilly's now. I've walked out with some pretty low volume IH parts that my local IH dealers had in stock, I've been shocked how high the prices were a couple times, like $18-$20 H and M oil filters, and couldn't believe how LOW the price was other times, like a $50 Cub Cadet voltage regulator, typically are over $100. It really helps if you can give the counter guy the part number, I have parts books for most of my stuff.
  15. Funny story, My neighbor to the north when I worked at FARMALL was a General Forman at the East Moline Plant, neighbor to the south was an incoming quality inspector at Deere's BIG parts distribution warehouse, neighbor next house south worked in Information Technology for Deere, he worked in most of their plants, and His WIFE I found out worked in material control at Deere Harvester, I've NEVER understood how Deere's procurement system works, I don't think ANYBODY does, they sure have problems getting parts for assembly. Anyhow, Neighbor's wife gets the notice a bunch of Chevy 292 engines are needed at a daily rate of 4 per day starting in 2-3 weeks, She calls the GM plant and says they have these engines on order, maybe 100 engines, probably a semi-trailer load? She say's She needs 4 per day starting such-and-such a day, GM guy says, "We'll ship all 100 tomarrow, we built them yesterday." Same plant probably built 1500 V-8's yesterday too! Both the neighbor and his wife were amazed GM could build that many engines so fast. I was about 12 yrs old when the folks took me thru a FORD engine plant in Detroit, all small blocks, 289 & 351, couple years too early for 302 & 400.
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