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gwoswald

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About gwoswald

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  1. Got it tonight. Had to lift one side, put in a shim, lift the other, shim it, etc until it finally popped loose. Didn't see anything obvious on the head gasket, but my experience is limited and it was somewhat boogered up. Then I rolled the head over and saw some interesting stuff going on. It looks like there was water getting into the #4 cylinder by areas of carbon that are removed. Also #3 looks like it might have something going on. This was also the cylinder that I saw water running down the inside of the cylinder. So looks like the head might need to go out for an evaluation and probably some work....or maybe I'll have to look around for a high compression head...
  2. Farmall Doctor-I'll try the dowel trick and see if that will work. I've had penetrating oil on it for a month. To me it looks like I have interference between two studs and the head. Seems the most stuck on the manifold side at the back. I've had the front tires off the ground already.
  3. Yep, got both of those areas. Tube on back, thermostat on front. Best as I can tell, I got all head nuts off and all ancillary stuff is clear.
  4. Here is what we have so far. The head is lifted off the block, but darned if I can wiggle it off.
  5. Longest project ever.....so I got this head unbolted last summer, tried to lift it off, and she's stuck tight. Slight gap on one side, but the manifold side was tight down. So I pretty much left it for the winter. Finally got out and started playing with it again. I filled the cylinders with twine and hand cranked the motor and was able to make a gap between the head and the block. I now have probably a 1/32" of daylight between the block and head. Now, however, the head is not wanting to come off. I lifted the front end off the concrete trying to pull it. I had a nice even lift on it. I tapped it from all directions with a rubber mallet, lifted one side, then the other, etc. Any thoughts on getting the head off? Seems like a few of the studs are tight to one side of the hole or the other. Should I try and remove them? I don't really want to booger them up or crack them off.... Thanks! Greg.
  6. No experience with the model or motor, but it does sound like no fuel is making it to the cylinders. My trouble shooting steps would be: Is there a manual prime on the pump? If so, does it feel like your drawing fuel at the pump? If not, can you confirm (confirm being the important word) that fuel flow is good to the pump? If your confident that there is definitely good fuel flow at the pump, I guess next is, is the pump pumping? Or did mechanically something happen that it's no longer driven? You said you replaced it, with a known good? If the pump is pumping, and you have good fuel flow to the pump, then it's got to be between the pump and cylinder, which leaves lines and injectors? That would be my start at any rate.
  7. Quick update, after a few days there was some leak down in cyl 4, and I though I might have seen something in 2 also, but tough to say. I also realized that there is discoloration on both sides of the head gasket joint on the newish paint. That makes me wonder if there isn't potentially a warp issue, or perhaps when the engine was rebuilt there was excessive sleeve protrusion. I have the head all unbolted, just need to grab the lift and pull it off.
  8. Yep. Schwartz wide front. It still has the small gas tank in place, Lines and all, which I though was neat. Roller drawbar and a canopy at the moment. Also came with a good condition paper fiber belt pulley I'll probably put on for looks after its back to running. Here's another shot of it. Need a good wash.
  9. Photo showing the leak area. You can see the coolant on the con rod and if you look upon the sleeve, you can see the droplets coming down from the piston skirt
  10. A potentially encouraging update: Went out and looked in the block and was able to see coolant on the big end of the cylinder 3 rod. Looked up and saw coolant in the #3 cylinder coming from the piston skirt. Rotated the engine by hand and was able to confirm the leak looks to be coming down the cylinder bore inside the sleeve. So to me, this says there is potential this is head related, either gasket or a cracked head at cylinder 3. So next step seems to be pull off the head and see if the head is cracked or if it looks like a bad gasket. Anything I'm missing?
  11. Thanks, lots of good insight and a few things to looks at. I bought it for under a grand knowing that it was going to need some engine work and assuming a new block could be in the future. I think I'll start by repressurising after letting the crank case drip out for a day and try and look again.
  12. I have an M that was acquired last fall. The tractor was reportedly rebuilt (with fire craters) and then the timing wasn't quite ironed out and the previous owner observed a small amount of coolant in the oil. Decided to move it on. Fast forward to this weekend, finally had a chance to get it moved into the work shop. I've run it for about 5 minutes total since I bought it, on/off trailer, in and out if two buildings. Zero smoke on start up or while running, however, it does have a pretty good stumble. Drained the oil, serious antifreeze in coolant. Total milkshake with a good cup to a pint on cracking the drain plug. I dropped the oil pan and put about 5# air pressure on the radiator, but was not able to ID any leak locations or seepage around the sleeves. I figured next step will be pulling the head and see what it looks like? Anyone have any other thoughts for what to check?
  13. 8620 is a good carburizing grade. It doesn't have a ton of tensile strength all by itself, but it has enough alloy to harden well once carnburized. 4140 is a through hardening grade, usually you either quench and temper or induction harden. My own favorite grade is 4340. 4340 has a substantial nickel addition that makes it really tough. As an industry professor I had once put it, it's "a real man's steel". At my previous employment (metallurgical failure analysis) we were testing 120mm diameter pins that were used as link pins in heavy mining equipment. Incredible impact strengths in comparison to a 1045 or even 4140. Gears are interesting. The vast majority of failed gears I looked at either were over hardened (entire tooth was through hardened) or under hardened, where the case did not extend to the root of the gear tooth, resulting in wear.
  14. Cold temperatures decrease mileage noticeably in my experience. Also tire wear or alignment. I have had alignment issues twice. Once mileage went down, once it actually went up.
  15. Magnet test first. Then file the edge to confirm solid color all the way through. Could also figure it out by weight if you were ambitious. Copper alloy will be quite a bit heavier.
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