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  1. I'm happy for my daughter to have been selected to sing at the FFA convention this fall. She graduated from homeschool this year so I'm also grateful for my wife to school her and the others. I'm told that they will be on RF TV even . Not sure if this link will work so I added a picture also https://www.tiogapublishing.com/the_wellsboro_mansfield_gazette/community/local-ffa-member-grace-bishop-chosen-to-perform-with-national-ffa-chorus/article_ed287e00-453b-11ee-a310-0be580686e85.html?utm_campaign=blox&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&fbclid=IwAR2ksJ9Ln73RrNaz7vP44cnEhPjSKrp7y-DIJgt_dqNTBiYuuD_7m2g-Dbo
    60 points
  2. So today after my youngest son's branding and after the meal. Instead of drinking whisky with the guys out in the shop which is the tradition I went to the house where the missus was babysitting the two youngest grandkids. I got some quality time in with one year old Jep until it was his bed time. And especially happy providing a resting spot for our new two month old grandbaby girl Cora, who I didn't give up until about midnight when I was ready to go home. It was the perfect ending to a perfect day. I think maybe I can get used to this grandpa thing🤠
    57 points
  3. My 4386 came back from the paint booth a couple weeks ago, finally got around to taking pictures when the sun made a rare brief appearance this morning. Went through it this fall, fixed a couple leaks, put new manifold and new 3LM 466 turbo on it before painting. Got a little freshening up in the cab to finish up this winter. Pretty happy with how it turned out
    56 points
  4. I finally got this project done in my basement. The rounded shelf end caps were out of my old IH dealer. I got them for free when they remodeled their store. Pretty happy with how it turned out.
    55 points
  5. Our local fuel injection shop is closing the doors after 50+ years of service. I have used them for parts & services for nearly 25 years that I have been in business. They approached me regarding purchasing it, after much thought and consideration we have made the decision to move forward with the purchase. I was able to purchase the complete operation, test stands, tools an all contracts with Bosch, Delphi an etc... exciting times ahead. The 2 employees have agreed to continue to work part time to help us get on our feet, alternating their days so we always have an experienced guy on tap. We will have to build unto our facility to handle this step, but in the end hope it will all work out..... (I should have put this under the support thread 🙂)
    51 points
  6. Well they all fit , weight frames off ,weights off , quick hitch off and they just barley made it 😅 This would have been what you would have seen at the Farm Progress Show in the fall of 1985 , IH had this lineup done and ready for the public . The merger took place on January 1st 1985 and the powershift 50series was converted into the Magnum and introduced in the fall of 1987. These two smaller utility tractors got there old hoods put back on and they put the Case IH decal on them and sold these until the come out with the Maxxum tractor lineup . The 485 and 885 belong to Herbert Starzinger from Austria , they have never been in the field and are basically new yet with 370 hours on them . They have spent their life after IH / Case IH up here in the north country at the University of Wisconsin Ag Engineering school in River Falls WI . The school sold them 3 1/2 years ago and Herbert purchased them . He contacted me and was wondering if I would restore them for him . It’s been a bit of a journey but I finally got them finished up this spring . See you guys on Wednesday afternoon /evening 👍 Danny
    47 points
  7. Every kid needs a hero. We're given one before we are even born. We call him Dad. My dad was born in September of 1951 on a little farm in the hills of Walhain. In 1957, Grandpa Wallace purchased the farm in Duvall where my dad would live the rest of his life. In the 60's as a teenager he took his first job hauling milk for the Duvall Farmers Cheese Factory. He was quick to tell you that he didn't hook up a hose and turn on a pump because, "In those days, you hauled milk in cans." In 1969 when the Luxemburg Blue Jays and the Casco Comets merged, my dad graduated as a Spartan. He soon after married my mom and they put a trailer house on the farm where they would raise two perfect kids. (I said they raised two perfect kids. Not, they raised two kids perfectly.) Through the 70's they farmed with Grandpa and in the back yard behind the trailer, he ran a repair business he called High Performance Shop. It was a place that farmers, neighbors, and local businesses brought their tractors, trucks, and other equipment to be patched up and put back in working order. In the 80's when Grandpa decided to retire, the farm was purchased from him. If you aren't old enough to remember, the economy of the 80's wasn't very friendly for the farmers. That meant there were loose ends to tie and bills left to pay so Dad took a part time job at SAS Salvage in Luxemburg. There he would dismantle and crush cars. I think it was there that Dad fell in love with driving truck. The salvage yard had a 1969 Kenworth that Dad used to haul cars from the auto auction lots in Chicago back to the yard in Luxemburg, and haul the crushed cars out to be recycled. We even used that Kenworth to haul a load of farm equipment that we bought at consignment in Indiana back to the farm. In the 90's when the salvage yard closed, Dad still had hungry cows and bills to pay. That's when he started driving school bus. How dad lasted that many years with that many kids screaming behind him is still a wonder. Perhaps it was because of the friendships he made with the other drivers. Friendships that lasted until his final days. In the 2000s dad walked away from the school bus because he finally purchased a Kenworth of his own. The cows were sold and the farm changed over to cash crop and Dad headed out over the road. He drove from coast to coast. North border to southern shores. He'd haul military equipment to the far northwest of Washington State and come back with a tractor that dribbled over the Canadian border. He'd head to the ports of Baltimore to pick up the new Massey Fergusons coming in from across the pond. He'd haul a load of used utility tractors to the Texas shore to be shipped to South America and even a bulldozer to Florida to be shipped to a port unknown across the globe. He grumbled about not getting paid to haul that dozer. Each trip he'd come home with a story. He'd talk about the beauty of the Badlands in the Dakotas. He loved Roosevelt Park. He'd tell us about the mountains in Virginia and the "hillbillies" that live there. He'd spin an F-bomb laden story about a driver in Chicago who cut him off. Or how the corn in Kansas was up, but we still had snow on the ground. I may not have shared anything that you didn't already know about him but I'll take this time to share a confession about myself. For most of my life, I have been a thief. For all the time that I spent with Dad, I stole with my eyes and ears. See, Dad may have been a milkman, a junk man, a bus driver, a truck driver, and most importantly to him, a farmer. But, he was also a teacher. Dad taught me how to do a lot of things... Dad taught me how NOT to do a lot of things. Like when he'd miss the chisel and pound on his hand. He'd yell "Charles, you dumb son-of-a something or other." I'd say, "Hey, your not the only Charles here, and I didn't pound on my hand." It didn't help get the bearing off the shaft, but we'd both laugh every time. Dad taught me to be a plumber at Four AM when you get to the barn and a water cup stuck and all the aisles and gutters were flooded. Dad taught me to be an electrician at 10 below zero and 50 feet in the air when we had to rebuild the electrical contact rings on a silo unloader so we could get the cows fed and still get to church on time. Dad taught me to be a carpenter. In fact, all but one of the sheds on our farm were built with our hands and the hands of helpful neighbors. We even tore down, moved, and reassembled our own stave silos. Not many folks know how to do that. Very few would try, and even less succeed. Dad taught me to be a mechanic. He taught me how to diagnose, repair, rebuild, repaint, modify, and even fabricate our own equipment. He taught me to take what you have, and turn it into what you need. Doing so, he taught me to weld. True story. I was 8 or 9 doing morning chores feeding cows and the feed cart broke. I asked Dad if he could weld it. He said he was busy milking but I could weld it myself... Now, I had put on the spare welding helmet and watched him weld countless times. He had explained what he was doing but I had never done it myself. That morning he described how to set the welder. Reminded me to attach the ground clamp and how to "chase the puddle" as the metal melted away. As I headed out the door heading for the shop I heard him. From under the cow he was milking he yelled. "Hey Kiddo. If it sounds like you're frying an egg, it sounds like you're doing it right." That feed cart is still in the barn and I still use it. Dad could have pulled out the Kenworth, loaded up, and chained down. Drove off to anywhere in the Continental US that he chose. Truth is, he preferred to drive in circles. Out in his fields. His favorite was in the cab of the combine harvesting corn. Part of him will always be with us. There's a part of him that is somewhere else... Wherever that is... I hope his tractor has an air ride seat... I hope the air conditioning blows ice cold... I hope the diesel fuel is cheap... I hope the soil turns easy and comes up black as night... Every seed salesman and fertilizer guy will tell you that he asked for it every year... So, as Dad plants his eternal fields, I hope he finds that magic combination. The one as he said "makes his corn grow only four feet tall, but has three foot cobs." Love you Dad.
    44 points
  8. This 1256 for a customer makes number 436 paint jobs for me since 1981 when I started painting .
    44 points
  9. I thought I would show everyone what Smoker1 has been up to. He is my Uncle. For a Christmas gift to my Grandson, he completely restored the IH 560 pedal tractor I got in 1963. It is better than new. To top it off, he restored another 560 a neighbor gave me. Just in case I have another Grandson. Jerry, I cannot thank you enough. You made a little boy and a bunch of older people very happy today.
    43 points
  10. Jep William entered this world at 12:06 pm Weighing 7# 9oz and being 21" long. Mother and baby boy a doing great. We are both humbled and joyful and will do our best to care for this new life that the Lord has blessed us with.
    42 points
  11. Did a little recreational tillage last week with a neighbor who still moldboard plows some ground. Took the 4386 over and plan was to have 5 tractors out plowing that afternoon, me with the 4386 and my 6 bottom 700 trailer plows, they use a Case 4494, a Deere 8640 and 8760 all with 7 bottom 700 trailer plows and another neighbor with his Deere 7520 and 6 bottom Deere plows. Well didnt quite go as planned, my plows, the front hydraulic cylinder broke the clevis on the end of the ram the 2nd pass, their 8640 blew a coolant line just before we started so I hooked onto their plows. The other neighbor got busy and couldnt make it with his 7520. Maybe next year we will have a little bigger plow day. Still had a good time. Been wet this spring but this ground is well drained so plowed nicely, conditions were perfect. Rained about 2 hours after we finished. Have nothing planted yet. A couple guys have a day or two of planting in but 10 day looks wet and cool. Less than ideal. There may be a Youtube video coming out as well😉
    41 points
  12. Well guys, I have kept this one under my hat for awhile now. Only one other forum member knew about it and he kept it confidential. Story time: In the spring of 1996, Dad and I sold about half of our farm equipment off to settle our debts from the miserable hog prices. Included in the sale was Dad's 856 Custom. He had purchased it from Grinnell Implement in 1976. I grew up operating that tractor: disking, spraying and running it on the 500 bushel Behlen batch dryer. Was sad to see it go. The new owner was a fellow we knew. He pulled the cab off and installed fenders. He used the original cab steps to climb on the tractor. A couple years later, he offered to sell the 856 back to us. Terrible timing: I had just secured a loan to purchase my 71 856 with factory cab. Had to pass on his offer. He sold it to guy east of Brooklyn. Then that owner traded it to the dealership in Blairstown. From there, it went to an auction and a machinery jockey purchased it. He had no record of where it went. So, the trail went cold. I gave up on finding it again. Flash forward to last spring. A friend of mine texted me. Was I parked at Theisens in Grinnell with what appeared to be a 56 series tractor on my trailer? No, I was at work. Okay then. That night as I drove home, I spotted the rig and pulled in. The guy had a flat tire on an inside dual and had finally returned from home from over by Iowa City with supplies to change it. I gave him a hand and we swapped out the tire. The tractor on his trailer was an 856. A closer look revealed it was a Custom. That old familiar feeling came over me. It had cab steps on it.... No, probably not Dad's. This one has an M&W Turbo and the front radiator casting was painted white like a 1206. Above the badge was the faintest outline of a rectangle decal, nearly worn away with time. Dad had a Hy Capacity decal on that spot on his tractor. The owner and I talked awhile. He purchased it from a jockey over at Riverside Iowa about 15 years ago. He had always wanted a 1206, so he painted the front casting while and added the M&W Turbo off an 806 he was parting out. My mind was racing, could this be Dad's Custom? The tach works and showed 8500 hours. Dad's had 12,000 when we sold it. 6000 more hours over the years. Plausible. He told me that he had the engine overhauled when he installed the Turbo, as it was getting tired. We parted ways that day. If he was interested in selling, he would call me. I gave him a business card. Last fall, he attended the Chapter 5 meeting in North Liberty. We spoke awhile and he would sell the 856. I decided to think on it awhile. Dad spent several days, after the holidays, digging through his old records looking for the serial number of his Custom. Found it last month. Confirmation! Somehow, after all these years... Dad's Custom is alive and well over at Tiffin, Iowa! Yesterday was the day. Jumped in my F150 and headed to his farm. As I drove up the drive, the 856 was perched on a driveway next to the house. It looked so wonderful! Not as pristine as in my memories. Time and thousands of hours have changed the old Custom a bit. But, there it was! And it looked like heaven to me. Oil and hy Tran looked good. It started easy and sounded good! The whine of the Turbo made my spine tingle. The old Custom smoked a little out the straight pipe, but cleared up quickly with just a little load on the engine. It ran, drove and shifted good. Passed the TA test. The old wooden spinner was gone, but the impression of where it was clamped on the steering wheel remained. Worry creeped into my brain.... what is he asking for the old 856? Could he know how desperate I was to take it back home again? Test drive completed, I climbed off the 856. His son and grandson had joined the party as I drove around the property. We talked of the weather, farming and IH tractors and tractor collecting. His son wanted to show me his baby. He disappeared and returned with a sweet 1066 with white cab. It pulls a disk in the spring and a round baler all summer. The cab insulation is all in place and the A/C works! 8000 hours. Nice 10. Negotiations went smoothly. His price was fair. I wrote him a down-payment check and we shook hands. I have 6 months to complete the deal. He said it was fine there until my schedule was empty. His grandson asked me: are you really going to take the tractor away? Yes, I am. But, you know a little secret: that tractor used to be my Daddys. It wants to go home! The fella asked if that was true. Yes, it was! That led to long conversation. Lots of great memories from both our families. Then we headed to Tiffin and had a wonderful supper. Such a eventful day!
    41 points
  13. This was sent to me by my bride of thirty something years this morning Being in a relationship with a hard working man is not for everyone. This is why some women these days are interested in men with no life perspective Having a relationship with a hard working man is to understand that he might not always be available for you You may think, there are times where he will not always seem invested in the relationship, but it's not the case at all, it's quite the opposite, he wakes up every morning and works hard every chance he can to create a stable future for you. You need to understand there will be days where he will most likely be tired and he'll barely have time to take a shower and give you a kiss and head to bed to get some much needed sleep to start it all over again the first thing in the morning. Do not take this kind of man for granted He might come off a little rough around the edges because of his dirty callused hands and greased stained shirt, but this man will love you with a type love you have never experienced before. So here is to the hardworking men that are married to the woman their dreams that get up every morning and work hard everyday for their families in order to live a life they have always dreamed of.
    40 points
  14. So I was driving home from work today, a little discouraged about a mildly annoying situation (that I can't do anything about.) Got home, needed to load a load of square bales to deliver, my wife was trying to get supper ready, and this little feller was underfoot. So I decided to take him with me to load the hay. So we're in the barn, and as I'm loading, he's picking up all the loose hay and throwing it off the trailer. See, he's helping. And it hit me. Here I am with my little boy, who wants to be with me all the time, working in the barn on our little farm, getting ready to go eat supper with his mother and brother and sister in our comfortable little house - and all of us healthy. Not to mention ALL the other blessings I have (and those of you who know Him, know what I'm talking about). I have literally nothing worth complaining about. Fellas, I must be about the richest man I know. Sometimes things get us down, and we need a reminder of what's important. I just wanted to share that with y'all, in case, like me, you need a little reminder of how blessed we truly are. I don't usually post anything with my family or my kids (for reasons you all probably understand), but this was too good not to share. I climbed down off the trailer to take this second picture. After a minute of me standing there trying to take his picture, he says, "Daddy - back hay! Back hay!" Ok, buddy, back to work it is. Yep, he's mine, alright.
    40 points
  15. I set this up out by the road today. 7 IH's in total, would have been 8 but the 706 diesel hi crop hasn't arrived yet. 5088 756 gas. 856 Custom. 706 Propane. 806 wheatland diesel. 806 gas. 806 diesel.
    39 points
  16. All of our kids help on the farm, but the oldest son is getting old enough at 10 to handle a few tractor jobs on his own. He got to rake some hay this summer on the C but I didnt get any pics of that. We just finished up plowing and he got to make four or five rounds with me in the buddy seat. He was actually a little overwhelmed but settled in quickly. He actually got the hang of leveling the plow quite quickly.
    39 points
  17. A customer asked me how much it cost to do this job.... I answered him: $ 1500 He said: So expensive for this job? I asked: How much do you think it would cost you? He answers me: $ 800 maximum... That's a pretty simple job right? !" - For $ 800 I invite you to do it yourself. - But.... I don't know how to. - For $800 I'll teach you how to. So besides saving you $700, you'll get the knowledge for the next time you want - It seemed right to him and he agreed. - But to get started: you need tools: A welder, grinder, chop saw, drill press, welding hood, gloves etc... - But I don't have all these equipment and I can't buy all of these for one job. - Well then for another $300 more I'll rent my stuff to you so you can do it. - Okay, he says. - Okay! Tuesday I'm waiting for you to start doing this work - But I can't on Tuesday I only have time today. - I'm sorry, but I'm only available Tuesday to teach you and lend you my stuff. Other days are busy with other customers. - Okay! That means I'm going to have to sacrifice my Tuesday, give up my tasks. - I forgot. To do your job yourself, you also have to pay for the nonproductive factors. - That is? What is this?" - Bureaucratic, tax, vat, security, insurance, fuel etc. - Oh no!... But to accomplish these tasks, I'm going to spend more money and waste a lot of time! - Do you have them? You can do it to me before?" - Okay! - I'll make you all the material you need. Truck loading is done Monday evening or Tuesday morning you'll have to come by 6 loading the truck. Don't forget to be on time to avoid traffic jams and be on time - At 6??? Nope! Too early for me! I used to getting up later. ... - You know, I've been thinking. Y ' all better get the job done. I'd rather pay you the $1500. If I had to, it wouldn't be perfect and it would cost me a lot more. When you pay for a job, especially handcrafted, you pay not only for the material used, but also: - Knowledge - Experience - Study - Tools - Services - Time to go - punctuality - Accountability - Professionalism - Accuracy - Guaranteed - Patents - Sacrifices - Safety and security - Payment of tax obligations No one can denigrate other people's work by judging prices. Only by knowing all the elements necessary for the production of a certain work can you estimate the actual cost. I did not write this dialogue, but am sharing it to support craftsmen and entrepreneurs.
    38 points
  18. Figuratively, although I have physically once or twice. Little back story, I have always drank alcohol of some sort every night since I turned old enough to have a taste. Parties, just at home, sometimes in the middle of the day. It didn't seem to matter. I wasn't the type to be drunk in the morning and last all day, but I was the type that needed it to go to sleep or else I laied there in bed awake. When my wife was pregnant with our second, while I was sitting there getting drunk, I had a sobering moment. If I'm this drunk, how will we get to the hospital if it's time? I had to quit. I swore off it from that night. I went two years before I had another drink, quite frankly it was by accident, a cup I thought had my tea in it in the cart in the barn had a mixed drink. It was on from that point. Back into the same rut I went. I couldn't get back on the wagon. If I didn't have any in the house, I went to the barn, if none in there I went to the shop, if none in there it was the same thing, I would lay in bed awake wishing I would have at least a drink. I had to stop, it was starting to get bad again. Three months ago I was sitting there looking at my drunk a** face in the mirror and said you are pathetic, and you need to be done. This has gone too far, and it might not keep going at this pace. I swore off of it again and haven't touched any for the whole three months to this day. It's not much, but it's a start. I'm not looking for praise, but sharing this so if someone reading it has fallen off the wagon, you can climb back on like me. It's hard to climb on the wagon, but it's harder to tell yourself to get your crap together. You always think I'll do it tomorrow, but you have to commit today.
    37 points
  19. I saved a little life, so far, with the help of a friend this morning. But that life did a lot of his own saving first. It's beginning to become a running joke in our FD that we are in the business of saving cats. We even successfully performed TWO "cat stuck in a tree" calls in the last year or two. This morning I had a hand in my fourth cat rescue. It was a ripping monster fire at an old country church that had been converted into residences. By the time we got there, it was blowing out most of the sides. There was no saving it. One of the residents only escaped narrowly with the help of a passerby. About an hour in, we had it controlled enough to force some exterior doors to hit some fire inside. So I'm in with two guys from my company, and I hear over all the noise this high pitched squeal. I thought it was in the nozzle and my buddy points at the floor. Up to his chest in water is a miserable looking cat just sitting there, that has been in this building throughout the ordeal, waiting by the door. He was in too rough of shape to challenge me so I picked him up and handed him off. Colleague handed him off to the ambulance on scene. The paramedics gave him oxygen and laid him on the seat of the ambulance. I'm told he just laid there and cried and twitched. I just called the vet and he's alive. It's so remarkable that something survived that, between the fire, things collapsing, the smoke and then all the cold and the water. Vet says his temperature was 88 when they got him. I'm told that's very low. It must have been lower when I got him. It was below freezing and we were putting water on it all night long. I don't like cats generally, but this little guy fought so hard for his life, it's impossible not to admire. The situation, to put it nicely, at that residence wasn't good. I think there's a decent chance he doesn't get claimed or owners can't/won't pay for his care. I just called the vet and instructed them that he's not to want for any care whatever. He fought hard enough already, I refuse to let him die on account of human whim. I might end up taking in another freeloader, but I don't really have a choice as I see it. Rural volunteer firefighting so often means failure. We often can't save structures, lives or property because we start from behind so to speak. It feels really good to save SOMETHING. I know some of you guys are firefighters, so I wanted to share.
    37 points
  20. Not as big a milestone as some of you guys have had, but today was 11 years with the Mrs. 18 years together all told. As i ate my pasta concoction while trying to keep the little hands out of my plate and catch the bits of cracker she was not eating I realized it was the best anniversary yet.
    37 points
  21. After getting home from church service tonight I read this story that I stole from spacebook. I attempted to read it to the kids with dry eyes, my wife took over at a certain point and the oldest finished the story. My youngest has been telling me today that I am Santa. I explained that this story is much closer to what Christmas is about than the Santa story is. I don't mean to hijack but I think this is worth sharing ( unlike most of the stuff on spacebook)
    37 points
  22. I wanted it...I bought it
    36 points
  23. On Oct. 7 our son who works for us was injured when his truck fell on him while he was repairing a leaking fitting on the air bags. He was able to get his phone and called. momma and I set a new speed record getting to him. He was taken to the Med center then flown to Vanderbilt. Seven cracked ribs in his back and six cracked vertebra and spleen was bleeding. He stayed 4 days and was released. No lifting over 10lbs. he went home would not come here. Momma cooked breakfast for him every day and friends brought him dinner and supper. I went to feed his cows but the guy who runs the feedlot we work for fed for him every day until he was able to get around. I contacted everyone we had projects going on for and explained what happened, every last one of them said no problem even though I knew some of them were in a bind to get them finished the projects affected their living. A girl who has been a helper on the pipeline for the last 6 years called my wife on Wednesday after the accident and said her job was ending that day and she was heading home and would be here Friday to work until our son was better. Her father who was sons welder foreman and used to work for me and her brother and uncle came by every evening to help. The Dairy who we do a lot of work for offered to send 2 of his hands for a week to help out even though I know he is short handed. The guy who owns the diesel shop we do a lot of work for offered to come and get his truck and fix it. The guy who owns the factories we work for called and said I can send people, money or what ever you need. In about 2 weeks he was able to come back to the shop and work from a chair at the tables. For the last couple of weeks he is getting around better and his helper (she) watches over him not letting him do something stupid. Momma has decided she will be here as long as she wants to. As some of you know we lost our youngest son to cancer when he was 2-1/2 years old in 1992 and you can imagine how momma took this. Friends of hers called and texted ever day numerous times and that really helped. So yes there are still a lot of good people in this world, they go about doing their jobs every day but when the need arises they step up to the task and then disappear back to their world as if nothing happened. They don't do it for the notoriety or chest thumping, they do it because they think its the right thing to do. Both sons and family were here for supper yesterday, made us very happy.
    36 points
  24. 40 years ago this spring my dad bought the 71 Loadstar 1600 at a local farm auction. Its still on the job today carrying the seed and fertilizer for #24 spring planting.
    35 points
  25. When is my day? Do I get a month of celebration? Why can’t I be offended when evil is promoted on my sacred holiday? Better yet, why is evil being promoted on a sacred holiday at all? There are 300+ days a year that aren’t holidays for anyone. Why can’t those days be used? Just simple questions I find myself asking on Easter Sunday. I’m offended and that doesn’t make me racist, sexist, a bigot, or anything else. I don’t hate people. I’m simply offended and quite frankly I’m not sorry about it.
    35 points
  26. just getting through reading all the responses here. Thanks to Seth and Todd and everyone else keeping you all in the loop. I have Luke typing responses you guys are all right.
    35 points
  27. While I love all my IH tractors on the farm, this one is my favorite. Her name is Bobbi Ann and she has been with us for 27 years. And yes all of our tractors have names, and they are all girls. How about y'all? Which one on your farm is your favorite IH?
    35 points
  28. I put the cross up shortly after we bought the place. I had put a nice string of solar lights working before I attached it to the barn. Didn’t have a long extension ladder so I had the F11 as high as it would go and a 10 foot ladder in the bucket. Lisa was at work and was surprised when she got home. The stinking lights never worked, but I still got a lot of compliments. Yesterday I found some better solar lights, and we got a long extension ladder which is rated for 250 pounds. I weigh about 220 without the winter clothes. I HATE extension ladders!! But we have lights!!
    35 points
  29. Hey Guys ! visited my nieghbor’s this morning and they were doing a little finishing touches on the 1566. They all are local tractors that Eddie and His son Chris bought and restored to be workers , they fitted all three with two post ROPS , all have full sets of IH stamped weights , installed hydraulic clutches on all three , and full set of Calif style rear weights . I drove the 1256 and 1566 and from seat the exhaust sound is to die for , that light turbo whistle . I insisted they line them up for pictures ! Wanted Eddie , Chris , Steve the mechanic in pictures but they are shy and insist the tractors are the stars ! BTW No Leaks ! I am jealous ! The 1566 is sporting 42 “ rubber and inside weights tony
    34 points
  30. Bought my 5 year old his first tractor. I came across this super c with rebuilt belly mower for 1425 and I bought it for 1200. Will sell the mower so ya can't beat that price. Runs great, new lights , fires up fast. Will pull it in the 3500lb farmstock class and when he is old enough he will pull it.
    34 points
  31. Finished new farm shop the other day. I thought I would share the cherry on top for the whole project
    34 points
  32. Carol did not think a real TD 25 was wise for me to restore ! so I bought myself an early Christmas present. needed IH yellow on my crawler shelf Tony
    33 points
  33. Had to rush home tonight after a family date night to beat the setting sun.
    33 points
  34. Took some pictures over the last week or so, we are getting a late start, my life is hectic, MIL is in poor health and appointments have caused delays, AANYWAY we have a new helper in training in the woods this year, she is mostly observing, but helps carry things on occasion, and she makes a very helpful backpack tractor driver. so far we have made very light syrup, which is what we all like. Many folks from down country prefer a darker syrup with a stronger flavor, we don’t have much to offer in that regard, our woods run light, by the time ours gets dark, the quality drops off with it and it is not worth the time and effort. We are running as few taps as we can this year at around 600.
    33 points
  35. and still awesome after 50 years! Happy New Year everyone!
    32 points
  36. I understand this picture of my older brother and dad was taken in 1955, I wasn't round yet. They were up at the old place up in the hills north of Ozark. It was over 1300 acres. Lots of rocks, blackjack oak and pretty scenery but it was short on topsoil. I used to know the name of the horse. It was dad's last horse. They were very tight and it hurt him bad when she passed. They had a super C Farmall tractor back then. Sold it when I was very young, early 70s? Somewhere there was a pic of me on the super C with dad. We didn't grow crops or range maggots back then. Just cows and a few horses. Just thought y'all might enjoy. @sandhiller @mike newman
    32 points
  37. Since receiving my Grandfather's and Father's burial flags, I wanted a way to store them to keep them safe to hand down to my sons My wife had a gentleman make these for me. He wouldn't accept payment. Just make a donation to the local Legion Post 319 My eyes got a bit misty remembering them and their service to our great country.
    32 points
  38. Today, my parents celebrate 50 years of marriage. 50 years of farm life and all of the unique challenges it provides. Years of evenings spent apart while Dad worked at the factory. Years of illness and health, nearly losing both their children in horrible accidents. Burying grandparents, parents, siblings. Celebrating births and marriages. Years of lean and years of plenty. Never living the high life, but always living life on their own terms and in the solitude of their beloved countryside. 50 years that have nearly worn my mother's wedding band clear through. A 50 year testimonial to love, trust, strength, cooperation and honor. A 50 year mark, I will never achieve. Today, I honor the 2 people who gave me life, who read to me from the bible and storybooks. They chased away the monsters, calmed the fears. They did without so I would always have enough. They taught me right from wrong, respect for myself and others, the ten commandments, how to love others. They taught me that true wealth comes from your own labor, sweat and determination; not the hard work of others. To take pride in your accomplishments, but not boast to others. To honor your family and your heritage through your actions. To leave the world a better place than you found it. Special people raised in the baby boomer generation by the greatest generation this country has known. Please join me in a big Thank You to all those special people we know as Our Parents!
    32 points
  39. After she drys off from her bath. All ready for planting season.
    32 points
  40. So I knew of this tractor 25 years ago. My father in laws neighbor had it for light field work. 15 years ago the guy dies and his sons had all his stuff for sale so I thought it had long been sold. Fast forward to a month ago and talking to my fil and he said that it never got sold and was still sitting in a shed at the old farm place and hadn’t been started since the guy died 15 yrs ago. My fil talked to the sons and asked if they still wanted to get rid of it and they said yes. So we went up and aired the tires up and hauled it home. Got it home and put a battery in it and 2 cycles of the glow plugs and it fired up! So far the only issue that I have found is the ta doesn’t work but found that the ta throw out bearing went out and wrecked the ta pressure plate so that will be job for next winter. Has almost brand new rear rubber and the short turn kit on the IH wide front. Best part is I only had to give $500 for it. 1st picture was when we got it home and the 2nd is what it looks like after we got the cab off and tin work back on.
    31 points
  41. Back on May 11th I graduated from West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas with a bachelor's degree in Agribusiness & Economics. I spent the first two years at Northeastern Junior College in my hometown of Sterling, Colorado then my last two at West Texas. Those four years flew by, but were great for opportunities and friendships. God really blessed me and others around me the last four years. I wanted to share something I got yesterday. It is a 1953 Farmall Super C that my great-great-grandpa bought new. I didn’t even know there was still such a family heirloom around until back in November. I went and looked at it in December and was happy to see it had a wide front and the fast hitch three point adapter. It is a straight complete tractor and still had water in the radiator and oil in the pan. Fast forward to last month, yes it was still on the farm where it was when new and it would be my grandma's cousin (all same side of the family) that owned it. They were able to get it running so that was also a big step. We got it home yesterday. With it being a family heirloom I wanted to make sure to have it at least. It appears to be in good shape. It has sat outside for about four years. It shifts well, pto engages easily, tires are all good, no major dents. I have not had it running yet but my plan is to eventually fully restore it. It will be a slow process as I haven’t done anything quite like this before. I’m not sure when the process will start but the goal right now is to get it running somewhat decent and go from there. This was presented to me during a graduation party I had with a few other friends and our families so its more-less a graduation present. It would be 10 years in August since we got the 1948 Farmall Cub, so it was time for a second tractor! lol. I am very happy to have it! The Cub is in original patina but the Super C has been repainted so it will be a great candidate for a restoration. ‘48 Cub, ‘53 Super C, ‘92 GMC 1500, my first vehicle and took me through high school and college! The McCormick Cream Separator sign my parents got me for a graduation gift. This picture is from 1952. On the left is my great-great-grandpa that bought the Super C new. On the right is his son, my great-grandpa. Thought I’d throw in a pic in my cap and gown!
    31 points
  42. Dad went to a tractor reduction auction at friend's in Kansas in 1996. He had heard there was a low hour 806 there, and our original 806 had many hours on it. First purchase was an 806 Wheatland that "was going too cheap". Then he got the Farmall 806 he wanted. He called me that evening wondering if I was interested in a 1456 for $6000. It didn't bring that in the sale so it was pulled. Well, yeah. Trucking added $1200 per tractor. This is what arrived a few weeks later after trucking was arranged. Truck driver said he got lots of thumbs up while coming cross country. Understandable. I still have the 1456 and Wheatland. My brother has the Farmall 806.
    31 points
  43. Introducing the latest addition to our Gold Demonstrator collection the 1456 Wheatland. Very tight low hour tractor sold originally in Beach ND. Big Thx to all the skilled craftsmen that helped bring it
    30 points
  44. This is a wall mounted lantern hanger. I’ve been thinking about this one for some time. Started with 5/16” round stock, hammered the end out and made the hook complete with decorative curl. Next was to add mounting flats. Followed by bending it 90° At this point it was totally functional (2 screw holes drilled/punched) and I was called away for some family stuff and work. It sat for a couple weeks. Over that time I decided to add some decoration. One thing was a mortise/tenon corner brace. That was a piece of 1/4” round, hammered square and tapered on both ends to fit holes marked on the hanger. I put a double twist in this for fun. It was difficult to get everything just right. I had to shorten the ends of the brace after drawing them out small enough to fit the holes, un-bend the 90, and then get everything hot and put it together in both holes as I re-bent the 90. Tails were clipped and the ends peened to keep them in place. Again it could be finished but I wanted that long square section heading towards the hook to look better. Back in the forge and out for a double twist followed by another double twist the opposite direction for some flare. I will admit that one twist didn’t stay as even as I wanted but there is no fixing a twist so it’s unique now 😊. I was happy with it at this point so it was marked and finished with Johnson’s paste wax which gives it protection and a light sheen. I was please how it turned out.
    30 points
  45. Pulled the plow out the pull in a couple fence rows before we chisel plow.
    30 points
  46. As I mentioned in the 3788 thread. We bought a 7230 Magnum at the end of June. Got a ok deal on it knowing a few things needed to be fixed but were ok with that. It was delivered Tuesday and we have spent a little time addressing some of the issues. None major or really mechanical in nature. Not the most beautiful paint job on it anymore but otherwise it looks and operates great. Happy with the purchase at the moment.
    30 points
  47. Neighbor giving his 4366 some exercise. Had to stop while driving by with Combine. Couldn't miss the good photo op. 1976 IH Flyer worthy pics....
    30 points
  48. Bought this 856 3 years ago and wasn't quite sure what I wanted to do with it. It had a Westendorff loader on it that I immediately got rid of. came with wide front and 18.4x 34 rears. Tach shows 6xxx hours on a working tach but seller said it had rolled over. So thinking it has over 16000 hours. It has an IH turbo and manifold off a TD 15 dozer we think. It dynos out at 135. Spring of 2018 I plowed 300 acres with a 5/16 510 plow and it pulled like a new tractor and only used 1 quart of oil and used 5.6 gallon of fuel per hour. Had a few oil leaks that we fixed before painting. Local dealer put in the front engine seal for me and he said that engine has been apart more than once. I had the 30.5 combine tires with some stubble damage on rims.Next we found 10 bolt hubs off a 4366 and a heavy duty narrow front. Front tires are 11Lx15 8 ply. Back in October I took it to young guy starting out in the paint business and let him work his magic. I did all the smaall stuff but he did a fine job for his first red tractor. The first question you will ask is am I going to pull with it? NO! It is going to shows and be paraded. I have a restored 7 shank 55 chisel I'm going to work it some with and maybe pull my 770 6/16 pull plow land hitch some. I still have to figure out how to make a bracket to mount 1/2 weights inside rear tires. I don't want to use any fluids.
    30 points
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