Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/19/2023 in all areas

  1. 11 points
  2. We all make mistakes every now and then. This is a how the heck did I do that? We bought this ford 9030 bidi out in Montana this spring with a bad engine and leaking hydraulic pump. Any ways put the engine in this summer. I had bought a used engine for a 9030 ten years ago or so and didn’t need it. Well we put engine in and it fired up right away but we had stuff to sort out. So we worked on it a few odd weekends and would unhook batteries so nothing shorted. I charged batteries one day last week and reinstalled it and it sparked a bit when I hooked cable up. Not bad just a bit and didn’t do it again. Started tractor and washed it then noticed radio and gauges were not working. So I figured it had something to do with area I was working on engine. Uncooked the connectors from harness behind seat and it wouldn’t blow fuse then. Messed around with stuff and unhooked battery two or three times over three days. Took a volt meter to just check voltage on gauges that were blowing the acc fuse and it acted funny. Had an aha moment pop in brain and went unhooked battery and turned it around. Here I put battery in not looking and the name decal I put out. It was backwards and when I put cables on they only fit for length I just bolted them down. These were truck stud batteries so they went either way. I was lucky while I had alternator main wire on I didn’t have the plug installed on delco 10 si. Also being a rubber mounted engine the frame to engine wire was going to be attached when I finished other odd stuff so that wasn’t on yet either. Seems the only thing that got zapped was the radio. It was working before but will have to spring for a new one now. I just really feel stupid for not checking the positive position on battery first just had a other stuff I was thinking of. Here is picture of 9030 getting hauled home. I will put more pics of the tractor up tomorrow.
    8 points
  3. Had the boys and one of their friends out with me today while I was cleaning stalls. It never ceases to amaze me how little boys like playing in/on and around hay and straw bales. Took me about an hour and a half to get all the stalls cleaned up and a few other things. Yelled for the boys that it was time to go, and they were all surprised that the time passed so quickly. I remember being the same at that age. Always enjoyed playing in the barn in the hay loft. Always had half a barn full of small squares to play in. What do young kids play on now days? I guess round bales can be fun to play on also, but not really as easy to make forts with.
    7 points
  4. End of harvest photo dump. Finished Friday so unless someone calls very quickly, it is clean up this week if weather permits. 1” of rain Friday night so glad to be done before the weather turns for the worse this week
    7 points
  5. International Harvester Collectors Iowa Chapter 5 held their fall meeting Saturday at the JJ Nichting Dealership in West Liberty, IA. Their meeting room adjacent to the parts department was a beautiful venue. The meeting was hosted by members: Vernon and Evelyn Smith, whose farm was nearby. Vernon parked his 7488, serial number 1 and 7500 vari width plow outside to welcome everyone. Mr. Brown from Wilton, IA had his Detroit powered IH Transtar truck on hand too. Following a delicious meal and the Fall membership meeting, Vernon led the way with old #1 to his nearby farm. There, the members were treated to 7488 #13 and several other old IH machines. Vernon still uses most of them in his operation. 7488 #13 A few newer machines, I thought were interesting. A couple of Orange ones for DT Fan: Hope you enjoyed these photos.
    6 points
  6. Negotiate for commensurate compensation later this evening.
    5 points
  7. Hopefully y'all get to feeling better soon. My handicap daughter is 21 now. She is small for age only weighs 65 lbs. She still comes up to me to hold her when she's not feeling good
    5 points
  8. You're a good Dad. My kids are almost 20, 18 and 9 even now when they are sick you want to hold them like they were little. i was smiling just remembering holding our oldest a girl when she was that age. she was really sick and being our first kid debating if we should take her into a walk in clinic. I was holding her while wife was getting ready and baby looks at me throws up all over me. she then had a better look to her and walked away. Just remember your dad duties never end for years to come.
    5 points
  9. Our 10 year old daughter got her first buck today. Saw him run out of corn we were harvesting, hot on a doe. We were able to stalk him and take him laying down. She put a perfect neck shot on as that was all that was available with the weeds and such. Her 12 year old brother wasn't impressed that he didn't get one yet.
    5 points
  10. I remember the guilt of holding our kids when they cried. They weren't old enough to tell us what hurt and we weren't smart enough to figure it out sometimes. Such simpler times though. Now it's twice as bad. My daughter holds my crying granddaughter. Now I feel for my daughter and her baby.
    4 points
  11. ...a few pictures of the logs that came out of Paradise Bay...(pictures above.....) Some very big Pinus Radiata trees in there....(Monterey Pine from Southern California...) Some of the trees dwarfed the Hitachi Excavator...The 'Red' tracked skidder is a "'KFC'' as we called it....Made up in BC, Canada,, ( I think ) I cannot remember the place name... Skidder was great ...it periodically lost a track...now putting those suckers back on ....shall we say ..''taxed the patience ''...but in mud , which is never in short supply in New Zealand logging...it performed really well... The skidder is a KMC..... calling it the ''KFC"" used to make the operator arc up , somewhat.... The bushman pictured last..is no midget...in fact that particular log took some getting on the barge... The day of the tracked skidder has now long gone...in favour of big Excavators with Waratah Heads and other sophisticated equipment.... Mike
    4 points
  12. Or a drive always seems to put them asleep
    4 points
  13. She’s got her IH crib set in there, what more possibly could a child need?
    4 points
  14. Into some 275 bpa corn today.
    4 points
  15. Here's some train stuff to keep the Montana theme going. This is the main, heading into Butte from the south. This is a UP stub line now & certainly not under wire. Here's the shop switcher in Harlowton. It was electric & ran off of an extension cord. It's on display somewhere around town. Here's a Little Joe in Three Forks. A 4-6-0 on the Gallatin Valley branch, crossing bridge over Madison River at Three Forks. Going to guess that's an NP bridge behind it. Saltese.... a very long time ago. And to finish.... a ride on the Olympian Hiawatha. When more Montana pics come across my radar, I'll check back. Hopefully soon. We have to hit 1000 pp. before the first of the year. ;v) Mike
    4 points
  16. I'm going to guess it's a 1938 Chevrolet van. By the looks of the back axle, I'd say maybe a 1.5 Ton version.
    4 points
  17. I see the tag was bumped off the M as the rivet heads are still there . The engine serial number is this picture , not sure what it exactly is , I maybe have to scrape the paint off to see it better. I think I remember the 39 H I had before had the number stamped on the top of the front end of the right frame rail . I'm just curious what year it is..
    3 points
  18. Hot Rod had converted their long time project 57 Chevy to EV here are some thoughts about that. Glad to see it is going back to Big Block power
    3 points
  19. If money wasn't an object, I think this would be a really neat repower for a loadstar. A v-8 diesel with a little bit of fire behind it without electronics, and it would fit in easily
    3 points
  20. Time to clean up, finished harvest two weeks ago. Had a niece get married the one weekend and the cattle came the following. So that delayed cleaning, best take advantage of a nice day. They will be few and far between going into winter!
    3 points
  21. Hope you and your daughter will feel better soon. I have a low battery smoke alarm story for everyone. This happened to a good friend. They were remodeling their home. Installed a lower ceiling in the bedroom to facilitate plumbing and ductwork. You can probably guess where this is going. Yup, smoke alarm left above the new drywall. They didn't even know for a good while, then months later the chirping started. They decided to try to wait for it to die instead of cutting into textured ceiling. It went on for some time. My friend considered trying to shoot it through the drywall one night. They even named it. We would ask "How is chirp?" After what seemed like a year or so it weakened and finally stopped. They were finally relieved. One night, a few months later, it went into full alarm. It sounded for several minutes. They were certain that the battery couldn't possibly last very long but eventually a hole was cut and the alarm was removed/destroyed. This of course was in the middle of the night.
    3 points
  22. Story continues- So we drove this ‘22 RAV4 XLE All Wheel Drive Hybrid. It was very nice. Wifey had a 2019 Toyota Camry which we bought last Febuary as a “temporary” car for her, after her 2019 BMW X1 was stolen on her in Austin. The BMW was found wrecked in Houston. We never saw it again. Well after seeing and driving this 2022 RAV4, wifey wanted out of the Camry. So long story short, we bailed out of the Camry- traded it in on the spot, and got her the cooler RAV4. Only 24,5XX miles on the RAV4 Hybrid. It was also a Toyota certified vehicle, but we then also bought the Toyota Protection Plan for it as well, which will warranty defects bumper to bumper 7 years / 125,000 miles. Holy crap- never bought two vehicles back to back before, but we took the plunge. We thought we got a good deal on the Camry trade for the RAV4. Wifey loves it so far, and the Hybrid feature is incredible. And it’s not the plug-in version, you don’t have to plug this one in. I don’t know who the h_ll would want a plug in hybrid, or a fully electric EV, when this hybrid seems to be the cat’s meow. So hopefully we see are all set for vehicles for quite some time to come, if they don’t get wrecked on us, or some SOB steals them! 😡 That was pretty traumatic when her BMW got stolen. Bassturds. Here’s pics of wifey’s new RAV4 still setting at the dealer, while we were working on the deal. I don’t have any pics of it sitting at home yet. Another white vehicle. Coinkydink. Lol! Really awesome car. Love it so far! Wifey likes how she sits up higher in it than she did in the Camry.
    3 points
  23. Sorry didn't explain, this was my buddy getting his draw tag filled this morning on my back quarter, my dad used to drive 200 miles to go elk hunting in the 50's, never would have dreamed they would be on the ground he owned
    3 points
  24. ...You will have remembered a million things that you wished you had asked your Dad, about....... Mike
    3 points
  25. I remember being very very young being sat on some small square bales with some ertl tractors and dozen farm cats during morning and evening milking. Our place is the place for family gatherings, the kids have plenty of room to run, the barn to explore in or garden tractors to run.
    3 points
  26. I thought I should reply since we are talking about 15 series...😆 I finished the last few rounds of corn with the "Ole 815" fall of 2003. In memory of my Dad that passed few months earlier, Aug of 2003. Combine was siting in shed, had not been used for several years. Mom jus didn't understand why I would waist a whole day getn it ready, maybe it was more than that, jus to make a few rounds with it.....well those of you who know, well you jus know why i would. It was bought new by Dad, 1976 model 815 Diesel I have video of it combining corn in 1991 running in the snow conditions during the Halloween Ice storm. I still have the engine but hauled the rest to salvage yard.
    3 points
  27. Rockland-Rockport Lime Co.-1956-Rockport,Me.-New P&H shovel working in the quarry. And I need an expert to ID the make on this bread truck looks heavy duty
    3 points
  28. My Brother bagged this one tonight. He had been after this deer and seen it quite a bit around his house.
    3 points
  29. I don't know a darn thing. And I don't have much to post either. But I can't let this thing die in its tracks. Tubacase47 won't have anything to keep track of if we let it kick the bucket. I hope you veterans had a good Veterans Day, yesterday. Like twostepn2001, I like windmills. Here is a Texas farmstead, A Model A Ford Coupe, and with a windmill and a reservoir for pressurized water in the house, I'll bet? That wouldn't work in Montana though. This is what happens to water tanks in Montana in winter. This is a railroad steam locomotive water tank, but you get the idea. Anson would have loved these mules pulling this wagon to town in Missouri in 1938. A ca 1907 IHC AutoBuggy in Victoria, Australia. A D-Model or big KB? I can't tell. Anyway an International Truck is moving a building in South Dakota. A General Motors GMC semi tractor is pulling a trailer nose sleeper van trailer. This was also on Facebook. It received raving reviews. A little boy thinks he's driving Dad's McCormick-Deering Farmall F-12 with lever lift mounted cultivators. Mike is shown backing our F-12 into his shed. There are two gray IH Tractors on a Montana Farm there! I used to own two McCormick Deering Farmall F-14s, but they went away. This one is "yard art" somewhere. Tubacase47 would likely love this photo with a "chicken roost" Case tractor at a dealership. Knox County, Tennessee - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Spring plowing with an SC Case tractor 1942. There was much discussion on Facebook about the model and year of this Case tractor. Gary😉
    3 points
  30. Hate to hear Hot Rod is giving up on the electric 57'. Nothing like the silent hum of a bad azz muscle car. Some charts and graphs explaining how much better electric is would help.
    2 points
  31. I stopped by after church today to get an idea of what happened. The gate is a double 8'x~15' tracked gate, manually operated, that closes in the center of maybe a 30' opening. Everything needed for a safe gate was in place except maintenance. Being manually operated, the force against the stop varies depending on who is working the gate. I believe the stop bent over time, maybe fracturing the welds, until the stop couldn't do it's job. The stop is in the shade at the far end of the gate. The inside of the gate is facing up and the wheels are on the right, so the side of the gate that fell on the little girl is facing up. She didn't stand a chance against a >500lb gate. I drove by this school for 14 years on my way to work before I changed jobs in '03. A guess is the gates are 20+ years old. A Gofundme page has been set up to help with funeral expenses. Arlette Adnan
    2 points
  32. Oh man. I dropped a buttload of sparrows with my Daisy 1894. I could often watch it travel. Bounced one off a high beam in a barn, and watched it come right back at me and hit the bridge of my glasses, Christmas Story style. Thankfully no damage to me.
    2 points
  33. 2 points
  34. Plowed some Skunk river-bottom gumbo Saturday. Interesting event, more diverse than most plow days. There were 5 or 6 WD 45's. Friend of mine was running his diesel and broke a tie-rod end. That ended his day! Nice little 330 utility. Really nice 450 and lots of others including a 2255 and a 4840. One beautiful 856 also.
    2 points
  35. I had an 89 Cavalier derby car with a 4 cylinder 2L engine I believe it was I hooked the cables up backwards and it started and ran in reverse, it was running terribly and the check engine light came on, maybe the battery light too, I was alarmed because it ran well before. Then I realized what I did
    2 points
  36. I did my automotive mechanic apprenticeship at a GM dealer from 2005-2008, the 4 8 week trade school sessions were specific to the GM apprentices, called ASEP (Automotive Service Education Program). If you did your apprenticeship anywhere else you were in the "General" program with 3 8 week sessions. The GM program was longer because they taught GM technical courses along with the provincially mandated training needed to obtain a mechanic's license in Ontario. One of our teachers told us that half the price of a new car is the warranty. Say in 2007 a new Chev Impala LT had a MSRP of $32000 CAD, that car cost GM about $8000 to produce, they have to double that to warranty it, plus a percentage to have some profit, so a dealer's cost is $18-20000ish, the dealer has to almost double their minimum profit margin to accommodate the warranty as well. There can be a lot of cost to the dealer for a warranty repair that GM doesn't cover. If the vehicle doesn't give much trouble there is some good money to be made. In my time at the GM dealer the 3.1/3.4 V6 was in it's heyday, replacing intake and head gaskets was a common job. The retail on the parts to do both head gaskets on a 3.4 was about 5-800 and 12 hours at 80 an hour, say that cost GM 1000-1500 with towing and courtesy car for a warranty claim. Even if GM had to do both head gaskets on a 2005 Venture van twice, both front wheel bearings and a transmission, they wouldn't be loosing, and that much warranty work would be uncommon. At that time the biggest/most expensive common warranty jobs were the 3.1/3.4 head gaskets, transmissions in half tons and transmissions in bigger sedans and minivans. Those transmissions were all 4 speed automatics, not 6-10 speeds of today. A retail price of $3000 for the complete overhaul and installation of the transmission was on the high side 15 years ago A the dealer cost of that time (2005-2008) safe to say GM accounted for $6000-10000 of warranty work per vehicle. With labour and parts cost of the time the most problematic vehicle's repairs would not come close to that number. Modern vehicles with direct injection turbo charged gasoline engines and 6 plus speed transmissions have way more expensive parts, and are usually more labour intensive to repair. I put a turbocharger on a 2017 Escape, the turbo was $2300 and not any fun to do, really tight, whole job was around $4000. I haven't done one but I hear stories of the GM 6 speed transmission in say a 2017 1500 truck is about $6000 for a GM SRTA reman plus labour, and the TCM is internal and needs to be programmed after, the fluid is also $15-20 a quart vs $5-10. The point I'm justifying is that newer vehicles have parts that are very expensive and require more labour to replace, also more prone to failure under warranty than older models. If half the cost of the vehicle is the warranty and potential warranty repair cost has quadrupled, that must contribute to the cost of the vehicle considerably In 2012 I bought a 2009 Impala LS with 30000km for $12000, that car had an MSRP of about $28000 new. At that time sedans weren't in favour vs SUVs and old rental cars like my wife's Impala were a deal. When she was looking to replace the Impala in 2021/2022 she wanted a newer Impala but sedans were not as plentiful and seemed to carry a premium for those who wanted them. She started looking into Toyota because they still had the Camry, it was a little pricy at around $38000, started leaning toward a RAV4. Similar story as other's, a used 2019 with about 70-80000km was $27-29000, new 2022 was $30950. Salesman said that someone would take the used one because they could get it sooner than waiting 1-6 months for new. She ordered hers in February and got it in April. Hers is the base model LE, the next step up XLE came with a power driver's seat, sunroof and pushbutton start and a little more but was 8000 more MSRP and 10000 more all in, if you got the fanciest one it was that much more again. The RAV4 LE she got was the best price and vehicle she could of got at that time in my opinion. I have appreciation for it's basic features, the Toyota has steel wheels and hubcaps, 225/65R17 tires-the same size as many Dodge Caravans really popular and affordable size, a keyed ignition, a gearshift that connects to the transmission with a cable, manually operated seats, it's relatively plain for the time it was made, has a fancy screen and heated seats, auto headlights, radar cruise, blind spot detection, and other modern gizmos. Maybe for similar money we could of got a Hyundai with fancier wheels, auto start and leather but we are in it for the long run, the Hyundai wouldn't age as well. GM, Ford or Chrysler were all more luxurious and cost similar to the RAV4 XLE, if we were spending that much we would still go with the RAV4 but that cost of ~$40000 MSRP/~$50000 taxes and financing total price didn't make sense vs ~$10000 and 18 months less payments, that's a lot of money more just for a couple more gizmos I think Melissa's Toyota story gives credit to my assumption that one of the factors in high vehicle prices is the cost of the warranty, even with Toyota reliability they next model up costs almost 30% more just for some power options Truck prices are crazy, trucks nowadays are much fancier than even 10-15 years ago. Most trucks made in the last few years are 4 door, optioned like a Cadillac, 20 inch wheels, dual exhaust, etc. Even bare bones work trucks have bluetooth radios, AC, locking differentials, 4x4 usually. Not saying that's a bad thing, new pickup trucks are crazy capable, the loads that many modern 3/4 and one tons pull are similar to what tandem dump trucks like an International 4900 with a 466 pulled in the 90s and the modern pickups do it at a higher speed. An 80s bare bones 3/4 ton fleet truck most likely would be 2wd, no AC, open diff, small V8 like 318/350/351, maybe a 300 or 292 I6, no overdrive trans, a pretty awesome machine I think, maybe all you really need. A modern pickup is substantially more machine hands down. I'm not a fan of modern trucks but aside from their electronic complexities they are more capable than any old one. Say a 2017 GMC 2500HD has better brakes and suspension that will last longer and perform better than any previous design, seen lots of those trucks go 140000km on the original brakes, the 2001-2010 HD would go 70000km max. I have a customer with a 2016 or 2017 3500HD with almost 400000km, he has had some DEF issues that cost about $4000 but otherwise nothing major, lots of tires and oil changes, I replaced the original rotors at 297000km in 2022. I'm not sure how Tom's 3500HD pencils out, probably cost him $70-80000 new and average $4000 a year in maintenance, has pulled a gooseneck like a single axle tractor, for 70000km a year, the convenience and speed of the pickup has to be worth something compared to having a heavy truck and pickup. His favourite old truck is a mid to late 90's 6.5L Chev/GMC, he has a 96 C2500 6.5L reg cab long box that his employees drive the most but he still likes using it too. Any old 6.5 or 5.9 Cummins, 7.3 powerstroke would never come close to what the 2017 3500HD could do. The price of modern trucks is high for sure, the performance they have when they work can't be denied or matched by any other, whether that performance is necessary or worth the money is debatable I feel like truck prices were relatively stable for 20 years from the late 80s until the early 2010s. A guy I know bought a new 91 C1500 ext cab short box for $25000, my Dad bought a new 99 Ram 1500 2wd ext cab short box for $30000, it was a discounted post recession price but I remember doing a PDI on a 2008 Chev C1500 ext cab short box window sticker was $31000
    2 points
  37. Spent A LOT of time with friends and my sisters playing in the hay loft making massive forts and lots of tunnels with the straw bales. What a blast! When the barn was full we'd make two forts on either side of the barn and play "war" or capture the flag type of game. One of us ended up shimying up an 8x8 beam and tying a rope to one of the angle beams way up high. Then we could swing on the rope from one beam to the next or flip off into a pile of loose straw. Man good times, thanks for bringing up this subject! The neighbor had a stacker, so in the fall he'd make corn stalk stacks and lined several rows of them up on the north side of our property. That made an awesome maze of passages to play hide and seek in, especially at night!
    2 points
  38. We have one of those pictures but in our case. Last round pictures
    2 points
  39. I have many fond memory’s of time spent in the barn.
    2 points
  40. My kids love to climb on the square bale stack. They pretend its a mountain. I love that they love it.
    2 points
  41. Put the Magnum cab mounts in... Travis
    2 points
  42. Why do I have to open these deer posts when I'm hungry? That's a good looking buck! Mike
    2 points
  43. Talking about tall stubble made me think of these photos, probably from 1972. Stubble doesn’t look all that tall which I’m sure is why the trucks are in the field. This is great-grandpas Gleaner F and IH A-160. I think the other truck is a mid 40’s Chevy by the looks of it. I’m gonna assume all these had gas engines? This is winter wheat planted with IH 150’s.
    2 points
  44. Argue value all you want but that case against the Trump family over real estate is a crime without a victim. The creditors were paid in full but the Uniparty seeks to confiscate assets and send the Trump family to debtor's prison, or something. It's a Stalinist political hit job and if they can do that to those people they will do it to anyone. Like the Trumps or hate them. It's a free country but it will cease to be so if this crap is allowed to continue.
    2 points
  45. Thank YOU for posting this Roger. Freedom is NOT FREE. Thank you who served our country! I never had to "give all" but I was signed up to do just that! Gary😔
    2 points
  46. Alan, if I had a 5.9, I'd be working on putting it in the 756! Come to think of it, a 301 Alley Cat wouldn't be bad either. Worst thing about a transplant there is I don't want to have to hack up the sheet-metal. Wouldn't mind having the 301 that's in the 7 available for a 460 puller project! Now you've got me thinking, may have to park the 7 next to the 185 and see how things line up.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...