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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/16/2023 in all areas

  1. My 7 mo old lab got tired of watching me load trailer tonite so helped with straps
    8 points
  2. 5 points
  3. Thanks for inviting me Gary! Had a great time as always. I hope you can use some of the gear I brought with and I was happy I could add to the lunch fare with some homemade pickles. They seemed to be a hit! I’ll just add a few pictures I took also. How many does it take to belt to the buzzsaw? Well the whole crew evidently! Andy was headed to the threshing machine to belt up… and nailed it first try. The man of the day in his element! Mike, Gary and Randy. Thanks again for the great day, hope I can make it again next year!
    5 points
  4. Shep with me down at the garden
    5 points
  5. In my opinion you should put 3 extinguishers on a combine….and make sure they are empty. Best thing you can do for a combine fire is good insurance coverage and let it go. Never right after a fire.
    4 points
  6. One of my heros , I use the name rusty shackleford on the interwebs and have a tattoo of him even
    4 points
  7. It simply comes from knowing right and wrong and teaching our children to respect others. That alone will fix 90% of the world's problems including politics. When this is ignored and we let the children make the choice of whether or not they want to listen to and respect others is when it all goes to crap.
    4 points
  8. Looks like someone has a suppression system:
    3 points
  9. Installer abuse!! " Fire that Mac can AK!!! LOL 😆 HP
    3 points
  10. “I wish you could have turned my head and left my heart alone” The Oak Ridge Boys, also the name of the song.
    3 points
  11. ....cannot remember KWRB.......and the book is at home ....somewhere .....packed away with a plethora of other books......as said, yet unpacked , and waiting for our old house to be finally finished.......so we could all be under the grass before the 'book'' see's the light of day.... .....its not everyone's ''cup of tea'' ...but I find that sort of history very interesting....and as you possibly realize by now, Kurt....some aspects of American "'Industry '' , and the chronological history therefrom, I find more than interesting ..... Mike
    3 points
  12. I like the double neck SG replica among others, some serious skills and interests over there 🏅
    3 points
  13. MT Matt, I thank you for posting the photos you did. It's hard for the photographer to get into photos sometimes! Gary PS: I got the governor into the 1940 IHC Farmall A, "Tony" today! I don't know if I have the magneto in the correct way, or 180 degrees off? I'll find out soon enough though! Thanks again for all of that "Loot!" (merchandise?) Stuff! Gary😁
    3 points
  14. Got the 856 and the 'hog' out and worked over the creek-line and some field edges. Some of this stuff is taller than the stack!
    3 points
  15. Emma will ride in anything as long as im there.
    3 points
  16. I’m in the process of getting this thing back road ready. Not a tractor but, it does have an IH engine.
    3 points
  17. 3 points
  18. My wife says she is glad that we both keep our eyes on the road when driving!
    3 points
  19. I have not been able to get Dolly to ride with me in the tractor since she was a puppy and rode in the 1486. Today Lisa moved the last of the bales, so she can turn critters back out and she sent me this picture. Her old dog Dude rode with her everywhere and now she’s got Dolly riding around with her. The 2090 has a nice place for hounds to ride.
    3 points
  20. Got a call last week from a guy who bought an estate and had a tractor abandoned on the property. My dad made an offer and picked up the t340a. Runs and works but serious oil burning and blowing out of exhaust. That's his project and he will look in the engine and see what's going on. Then I looked at this 500c last month but passed on it as I couldn't really use any parts....well, my son Ian bought that one. This one has a torque converter with a 3 speed tranny. Owner states machine had little pushing power when he bought it and parked it 8 years ago. I'm not familiar with that setup. Oil is milky colored and way over full. Machine will take tension out of the tracks but will not move. It rolls fine. Without getting beat up how does this machine work ? Converter turns the tranny I'm assuming. But where do I start with troubleshooting? Oil and filters will be changed. My 175 had a screen that had to be cleaned now and then. Not sure where to start. And sone pics of course.
    2 points
  21. Not mine, but OH MY!!! https://hibid.com/southdakota/catalog/475514/equipment--vehicles--farm-items--and-more- 10 vehicles Mike
    2 points
  22. Sorry, but photo 2 shows a great deal of rust jacking. You will not get new pads to fit until cleaned out. Salt = rust and rust makes twice the work for you. South Main Auto says a normal car will rust to nothing in about 10 years in the PRNY. (People Republic of New York)
    2 points
  23. ...very fortunate there, Ryan..... ...when you belong in the ''School of Hard Knocks, '' ....you never seem to graduate......Just get a few reminders, for example...'''Could have done better '' etc .... ....always interesting when some dim witted ,bloated bureaucrat....armed with a ''printed card'' to remind him and the peasants of his importance in this world, has a go at the machine operating peasant.... I do a lot of private river work....as distinct from municipal and or council river work...thus I get involved with these wankers quite often.. ,....I just love those verbal exchanges .... Mike
    2 points
  24. I doubt it would help on a grain fueled combine but after my neighbor's 1486 went up in smoke I bolted a fire extinguisher on much of my equipment. It would seem so that a deluge system would be worth it considering the number of combine fires there are.
    2 points
  25. I saw this on FB market place
    2 points
  26. You can spit on my pickup truck Call my ma a lousy whore Leave a flamin' bag of dogshit Outside my trailer door But, don't go messin' with my Pabst Blue Ribbon 'Cause, then you gone way too far
    2 points
  27. Got to try that… I always used an air hammer but your way might be better. Just did brakes on 2017 ford escape. Have to put computer into “brake service mode “ . Except no one could tell me how to do it because it was push button start. I hate this modern plastic junk. Ford found a cure for the rotten body in panels, though, just make the plastic fender flares and rocker panel covers wider so the rot can’t be seen until the part falls off.
    2 points
  28. I'm not here to color bash. I respect every color and know they have all have pros and cons and all break down. I respect for whatever reasons also for owning whatever color if it's a family tradition, or you have a good dealer with a excellent sales, service, and parts team. I've been noticing some major differences in my John Deere B vs the Farmall M and thought I'd share them. You guys can add to it, disagree or agree with me. These are just my observations and know the B and M aren't an apple to apple comparison. I have a 7 acre hobby farm. Most of the work is done with a Kubota. I still like to play though and use an antique tractor to pull a plow, qauck digger, planter, and hayride wagon around. 2 years ago I bought a 1951 John Deere B as my 1st antique tractor. I was lucky to run it 3 hours a year. After being involved in a traumatic accident it was hard for me to get on and off from the tractor and the little bit I ran it, it'd give me grief. With my injuries I just didn't have the motions to be able to crawl around or work on it comfortably. Also needing any kind of pointers it was kind of hard to come by having friends and neighbors all being IH guys. I sold the tractor for more than I bought it for and what I had stuck into parts oddly. I bought a 1951 Farmall M in the area that I really liked and was comfortable on. For my personal preference with my injuries these are the differences I observed and noticed. Pros and Cons. Climbing up: Both the B and M have about the same step strid going from the draw bar to the axel housing to the platform. The M though has a wider drawbar and more space between the fender and seat vs the B. You had to pivot sideways to get on the B Plat form. Fenders: I feel safer and more secure with fenders. The B fenders sat up much higher than the M's. If I get a sore back I could hang onto and lean on a fender. The M's are pretty low. Seat: The B seat was solid and had a nice wrap around cushioned seat that hugged you. I felt very safe, and relaxed on it. Being skinny I fit in the seat well. For a larger person it might be a tight fit. The seat had zero suspension though, you see a lot of farmers standing up on these tractors in pictures and see why now. Your back takes the brunt of the shock. The M has a pan seat with a spring. The p.o put a cushion on it and it helps. With the spring I can push the seat down and it gives me an extra opft to get up or room to swing my leg. The spring helps with any shock but feel like I have a death grip on the steering wheel feeling like I could tip off. Clutch: The B has a hand Clutch vs the M with the foot clutch. The hand clutch was in the way trying to get onto the platform but seemed a little smoother to run. The foot clutch is out of the way and so much easier for backing up wagons. The B you could tighten the clutch very easily vs the M you couldn't it was split or nothing. Brakes: The B had brakes on each side vs the M on one side you could lock. Hood: To remove the hood on the B you have to remove the steering wheel, pull out the steering shaft, and loosen the bolts holding it on vs the M. You pull the 4 clips down. Hydraulics: The B had a lever on the left side of platform for the Hydraulics. There were special John Deere ports you needed or you could tap into the pump with pioneer adapters. My m has live Hydraulics and have a leaver by the throttle. Front end: The B had a roll a matic front end that each wheel moved up and down independently. The m doesn't have that, but I haven't noticed a difference. Battery: The battery on the B was under the seat. You had to balance on the draw bar and try to pull it up and over your head. The M it's right under the colom. Parts: Granted I have a jd dealer about 10 minutes away but you're paying for the color. Any farm store like TSC, Farm and Fleet or Fleet Farm have basic tractor parts and carry every brand except jd. I like looking at parts and sometimes need it right away. I don't like ordering online or driving to a dealer just for them to do the samething. This list isn't really based on design or something engineered but just what I noticed. Again 2 different tractors, 2 different sizes. Size: The B was easier to put gas in, it fit in the shop, it was pretty nibble parking it in a tight spot in the shed and doing field work didn't have to worry about low branches. The M being taller it's hard to reach the tank, I need to remove the muffler to get it into the shop, it's a pooch in tight areas, and need to be careful in fence lines. Sound: A lot of the family and passer bys enjoyed watching me do field work listening to the putt putt putt of B. At 1st I enjoyed it but it got old real fast and a few cases the wife came running into the shed thinking I had a shot gun when she heard the tractor backfire starving it. The M has a nice grunt to it, I'm not sure about a straight pipe on it or not I guess if people miss the 2 cylinder sound I could pull some spark plug wires. Being a 2 cylinder you had a 50/50 chance on figuring out compression, spark or firing issues also. Resale: When I was 1st looking at tractors any 2 cylinder JD rusted out, hardly running seemed to be going more than a farmall. Asking around on forums most responces, was the name/color and the 2 cylinders are more collectibles vs say an h or m that is still used. I kind of agree with that. You drive by any smaller farm yet and an h or m is on the hayrake, shuttling wagons, on a drill or running the pto no Jd A's or B's though. You might get more for a JD but you need the right buyer vs a working tractor someone would use. Style: The B was kind of boxy and the rims just seemed blah. The M has some nice curves and nice designed rims. All in all both tractors have it's pros and cons and did everything I wanted them to do but I feel like I'm way ahead on the M with my injuries.
    2 points
  29. Guess that is a Vermont thing?? It's a 2020 with 40k and it looks like that??? I'd move lol
    2 points
  30. My Grandpa tells a story of going to look at a possible warranty situation in Maine in the sixties, at a potato farm, when he worked for A-C. The brand new machine had soot all over its belly because the farmer had always pre warmed his machines' crankcases with fire and took right to doing the same thing with his new machine.
    2 points
  31. Lots of times you have to chisel the rust off the mount and buff it clean so the clip ends up where it is supposed to.
    2 points
  32. Preserving the Past: The Yaeger Family's Steam Engines and Heritage (helenair.com) This is a link to the Helena Independent Record newspaper with the article written by a great lady who spent about three hours with me. It was a college project for her and this was her last submission on her last day there. You almost get to see MT Matt pitching bundles. Gary😉
    2 points
  33. A little each day after work,
    2 points
  34. I've had both roll-o-matic and non and the former is definitely a better ride than the latter. Hand clutch was a plus for me using child labor. Setting the wheels all the way in would just fit down the rows; got to remember the axles sticking out. A 5' finish mower was just right but the non-live PTO a negative. It needed an overrunning clutch.. Fruit long gone as are the B JDs. I still have a 620 which gets some use roto tilling and grading with a York rake; International is too big for those. Live PTO, real 3 point, and pretty good hydraulics on the 620 considering its age. 620 is the one little kids get to drive when family bring them, puts a big smile on their faces. Little boys want to drive a loader but that's not going to happen.
    2 points
  35. 2 points
  36. Here's some south Ga cotton. A rain would be nice
    2 points
  37. The only reason that Deere has the Roll o Matic is because IH didn’t want it. I think that was a poor decision.
    2 points
  38. First real job for the boring mill. Cutting out bad shaft bosses etc. Kind of a tall drink of water.
    2 points
  39. When I read the title to this thread I said to myself that there is no comparison between a JD B and an M. Apples to oranges kind of deal. You showed me wrong as there is a comparison between these tractors. Well done! And with or without injuries, you’re always way ahead on a Farmall 😂
    2 points
  40. Good lighting, concrete and less crawling on the ground. Still working on it.
    2 points
  41. Changed the oil last night in my 99 with the 7.3. Also finally got around to changing the brake light switch that has partially failed and as a result cruise, lock up convertor and shifter interlock would not work. I was dreading it, so put it off. Think I was recalling a switch that was a lot worse and was half scared not all my problems were related to the switch. Turned out it was very easy and it did indeed take care of the mentioned issues.
    2 points
  42. A 1086 is a really good dog tractor. The back ledge behind the seat is pretty nice place for them too. our dog Hagan loved the 1086 and the 2290. Stacked hay with the 2290 and he would stand on the back ledge and put his chin on my shoulder. What a good dog can get by with. BTW my handle on here Hagan came from the Blue Healer Hagan we had.
    2 points
  43. My old Tators dog was that way. Dolly not so much but she always had Dude to guide her. Now that she is alone, she is much more likely to go with me. She even went in the truck with me Friday. I think she was 8 months old and helping me bale in the 1486
    2 points
  44. Thanks for the birthday wishes Tom. It was good seeing you there. I didn't get a photo of you. I apologize for that. I did get a couple of MT Matt though. He's walking toward me in the 1925 Model TT. And Matt is visiting with me in the TT. I feel an inch tall. Matt brought several old items I forgot to photograph in the back of his pickup topper. 8' Binder aprons, wooden pitman's, and that blessed IH Farmall A governor for my 1940 IH Farmall A, "Tony"! I'm soon going to be installing that. Thank you from the bottom of my heart Matt! Matt is barely visible at the top of the feeder with his U of M maroon shirt. Nephew Randy is at left pitching. Mike is atop the threshing machine. Of course the 1925 Model TT is covered with chaff, but has a crop in the back end. I couldn't put the threshing machine on, without putting the 15 hp Case on as well. Andy Troutwine is my engineer. He's a pro. And besides I wanted to be doing my P.R. with people. Nephew Randy is taking his wife Donna and her friend for a spin with his and Mike's 20 hp Reeves. Andy Troutwine and Paul Consani (of Portland, Oregon) are keeping an eye on the 15 hp Case as it powered the buzz saw, making firewood. Jake, a friend of Mike's, Mike, and friend Cliff Olds are doing the sawing. I gave some friends a ride on the 20 hp Reeves. His wife took this photo of me. The photographer doesn't get into many photos, it seems. I was glad to get this one! An IH Tractor on a Montana Farm... Farmall M, Toot, to be exact... I was having our 5-1/2 year old Great Grandson Colt Summers of Spokane driving it after supper Saturday. The lady who was doing my newspaper story texted me to ask a question. so I had to depress the clutch. Colt can't reach the clutch. How much bigger of a smile could an IH tractor bring a little boy than this one, anyway? Colt loves anything with wheels on it that "go"! He was really impressed to "drive" great uncle Mike's BIG Farmall M! My 3-1/2 year old Great Granddaughter Haven Summers of Spokane is giving Granddad a kiss on the cheek! Last night, not long before we had to tell our family good night and good bye, I was presented with my 80th birthday cake, so Haven and Colt couldn't hardly wait for Granddad to blow the candles out. My weekend and today have been spectacular for this old guy. Gary😉
    2 points
  45. DavCut, This is John Loeffelmacher, at the right (behind) of the front wheel at the J.I. Case Factory. He was the designer and builder of this first 150 hp Case Road Locomotive. He was a rather short man in stature, though. My son Mike and I are both 5' 10" and we're standing beside Kory Anderson's 150 Case "#14,666" in 2018 when it was introduced to the world. This was #14,666 as seen in the J.I. Case catalog, I believe in 1904? I don't have my catalogs here at home. This isn't at the Sater Copper Mine. It is still at the J.I. Case Factory, before being sold to Sater. It is the first one, #14,666 pulling four 15 hp Case engines filled with water up the hill at the factory. Sater ordered the water tank behind the smokestack, as he'd be travelling a distance on the roads travelling. The round spokes wouldn't take the torque the engine put out, so new flat strap spoke wheels were built for this engine and the following units built. My late friend George Hedtke found the #14,666 boiler (what was left of it) in New Mexico and bought it. It is shown here as a water reservoir for a windmill. It was later used as a culvert in a sideroad, where George found it and bought it. George fixed it up and hauled it to several Case shows. After his death, it was bought by several Case enthusiasts. Kory and Kevin Anderson have the original 14,666 boiler at Andover, South Dakota. It is at left and Kory's NEW welded boiler at right. Kory had access to the ORIGINAL #14,666 serial number bronze plate and put it on his 150 hp Case. PS: Since the plate is original, Kory's engine must be a "restoration" rather than a "replica"?😁🙃😉 Gary
    2 points
  46. Here's some guitars. All pictured were painted by the oldest. Hard to tell in the pictures but most have some kind of lace or metal flake paint job. All the electric guitars were purchased as kits and put together by him. The aluminum one was built from a 1/8 inch sheet of aluminum and a 2×12 body with the turning done with a wire cup brush in a drill. The neck was purchased off the internet. Both play but I think the oldest gets more enjoyment out of building them.
    2 points
  47. Did you say axes? Just kidding. Carry on 😁
    2 points
  48. I think this will work out very well on the wheels
    2 points
  49. .......this is "'Maid "'....a female Huntaway..,,, of nearly pensioner age.....so we all get on well !!. She came from a big hill country sheep farm in the North Island...and due to a situation where the older 'hounds' find the hills get a bit steeper and a bit harder as the dogs age....(much like us two legged animals, I guess....sigh ).....some of the favored ones are offered, on a nation wide web site thing.....''free'' to the right family....rather than the brutal alternative which is often the fate of old farm dogs...you can't stack them in the hedge row, like certain blokes on this site do with their Dodge trucks....There is a bloke who runs a very big .cab over and double B train up and down both Islands....(ferry crossing the straight )....and he will ship the hound , in his cab , for the trip to its new home.... She has a good life at home, and here at the Station when my son comes down to add to the operating 'team'...she has her own bed....(.inside.)....rides in the Hi-Lux..not on the back Coming from a Hawkes Bay hill farm in the North Island ...she had never seen snow close up...The reaction was amusing ..but I was not quick enough on the camera to get her ''bull dozing'' along in the snow...... Mike
    2 points
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