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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/15/2023 in all areas

  1. Thanks for the birthday wishes Tom. It was good seeing you there. I didn't get a photo of you. I apologize for that. I did get a couple of MT Matt though. He's walking toward me in the 1925 Model TT. And Matt is visiting with me in the TT. I feel an inch tall. Matt brought several old items I forgot to photograph in the back of his pickup topper. 8' Binder aprons, wooden pitman's, and that blessed IH Farmall A governor for my 1940 IH Farmall A, "Tony"! I'm soon going to be installing that. Thank you from the bottom of my heart Matt! Matt is barely visible at the top of the feeder with his U of M maroon shirt. Nephew Randy is at left pitching. Mike is atop the threshing machine. Of course the 1925 Model TT is covered with chaff, but has a crop in the back end. I couldn't put the threshing machine on, without putting the 15 hp Case on as well. Andy Troutwine is my engineer. He's a pro. And besides I wanted to be doing my P.R. with people. Nephew Randy is taking his wife Donna and her friend for a spin with his and Mike's 20 hp Reeves. Andy Troutwine and Paul Consani (of Portland, Oregon) are keeping an eye on the 15 hp Case as it powered the buzz saw, making firewood. Jake, a friend of Mike's, Mike, and friend Cliff Olds are doing the sawing. I gave some friends a ride on the 20 hp Reeves. His wife took this photo of me. The photographer doesn't get into many photos, it seems. I was glad to get this one! An IH Tractor on a Montana Farm... Farmall M, Toot, to be exact... I was having our 5-1/2 year old Great Grandson Colt Summers of Spokane driving it after supper Saturday. The lady who was doing my newspaper story texted me to ask a question. so I had to depress the clutch. Colt can't reach the clutch. How much bigger of a smile could an IH tractor bring a little boy than this one, anyway? Colt loves anything with wheels on it that "go"! He was really impressed to "drive" great uncle Mike's BIG Farmall M! My 3-1/2 year old Great Granddaughter Haven Summers of Spokane is giving Granddad a kiss on the cheek! Last night, not long before we had to tell our family good night and good bye, I was presented with my 80th birthday cake, so Haven and Colt couldn't hardly wait for Granddad to blow the candles out. My weekend and today have been spectacular for this old guy. Gary😉
    11 points
  2. Drug home another one. 1943 W-6, been looking at it in a tractor yard since 2018 Never moved, made a deal with the new owner of the place and took it home. Rolled it off the trailer and it sat in the yard for a few days before I could get to it. Not a whole lot bigger than the W-4 I got last spring. This completes the collection… for now. 😂 It didn’t take too much to get her running. Drain the old gas, a couple gallons of water from the rearend, clean the carb and top off the fluids. Squirt a little oil in each hole when I checked the plugs and new battery. Had to adjust the clutch and took her for a spin down the road. Steering is much tighter than the W-9. Need to fix a few things but overall a real straight tractor.
    10 points
  3. 9 points
  4. Emma will ride in anything as long as im there.
    6 points
  5. I’m in the process of getting this thing back road ready. Not a tractor but, it does have an IH engine.
    6 points
  6. There are two Diesel Farmall 656s in my area, they have been here since new or near new, one Hydro and the other gear drive, both are owned by relatives and both have survived a shed fire. I was unaware that the Hydro was in a fire 20 years ago until recently when my cousin told me. The fire was at another farmer's place that they did custom work for. We all know that those engines need glow plugs by design and that's no fault against them. The common jokes center around: "still need glow plugs in a burning building" "(firefighter)'the building is about to collapse get out'(farmer)'I'm almost preheated, give me 60 seconds'" Both tractors are semi retired, the Hydro has no high range if I recall correctly, as a result of a hired hand towing it, I have seen it used on the PTO generator and dump wagon lately. The gear drive makes the odd appearance pulling a rake or tedder, or run an auger. There was another Farmall 656 around here back when that belonged to a customer of my Dad. I was removing the lift cover from the trans/diff and had a heck of a time, couldn't get it to separate, checked over and over for the bolts I was missing, I had all the bolts out, had a small forklift to lift the cover and I could almost lift the tractor off the ground but the forklift wasn't that capable, eventually with the forklift applying pressure lifting and some hammering/prying around the seam it separated, the crazy bond was the paper gasket, whether it was just the gasket or the gasket and some sealant in that joint, pretty wild the hold it had There was a 656 Utility Diesel gear drive that came around once, we painted it, the customer was an IH fan and a salesman at the local CaseIH dealer at the time, cool thing about that job was him providing new old stock IH hardware for the sheet metal Here's my cousin's 656 gear drive
    6 points
  7. My wife says she is glad that we both keep our eyes on the road when driving!
    6 points
  8. I have not been able to get Dolly to ride with me in the tractor since she was a puppy and rode in the 1486. Today Lisa moved the last of the bales, so she can turn critters back out and she sent me this picture. Her old dog Dude rode with her everywhere and now she’s got Dolly riding around with her. The 2090 has a nice place for hounds to ride.
    6 points
  9. Back to bush hogging with the 806 and 8 Ft Wood's. Spent close to 9 hrs on it. I'll probably end up wearing the old girl out on a bush Hog.
    6 points
  10. Picked the black eyed peas and sweet corn. Tomato’s are producing well and have fried up potatoes and onions a couple of times
    5 points
  11. DavCut, This is John Loeffelmacher, at the right (behind) of the front wheel at the J.I. Case Factory. He was the designer and builder of this first 150 hp Case Road Locomotive. He was a rather short man in stature, though. My son Mike and I are both 5' 10" and we're standing beside Kory Anderson's 150 Case "#14,666" in 2018 when it was introduced to the world. This was #14,666 as seen in the J.I. Case catalog, I believe in 1904? I don't have my catalogs here at home. This isn't at the Sater Copper Mine. It is still at the J.I. Case Factory, before being sold to Sater. It is the first one, #14,666 pulling four 15 hp Case engines filled with water up the hill at the factory. Sater ordered the water tank behind the smokestack, as he'd be travelling a distance on the roads travelling. The round spokes wouldn't take the torque the engine put out, so new flat strap spoke wheels were built for this engine and the following units built. My late friend George Hedtke found the #14,666 boiler (what was left of it) in New Mexico and bought it. It is shown here as a water reservoir for a windmill. It was later used as a culvert in a sideroad, where George found it and bought it. George fixed it up and hauled it to several Case shows. After his death, it was bought by several Case enthusiasts. Kory and Kevin Anderson have the original 14,666 boiler at Andover, South Dakota. It is at left and Kory's NEW welded boiler at right. Kory had access to the ORIGINAL #14,666 serial number bronze plate and put it on his 150 hp Case. PS: Since the plate is original, Kory's engine must be a "restoration" rather than a "replica"?😁🙃😉 Gary
    5 points
  12. I'm not here to color bash. I respect every color and know they have all have pros and cons and all break down. I respect for whatever reasons also for owning whatever color if it's a family tradition, or you have a good dealer with a excellent sales, service, and parts team. I've been noticing some major differences in my John Deere B vs the Farmall M and thought I'd share them. You guys can add to it, disagree or agree with me. These are just my observations and know the B and M aren't an apple to apple comparison. I have a 7 acre hobby farm. Most of the work is done with a Kubota. I still like to play though and use an antique tractor to pull a plow, qauck digger, planter, and hayride wagon around. 2 years ago I bought a 1951 John Deere B as my 1st antique tractor. I was lucky to run it 3 hours a year. After being involved in a traumatic accident it was hard for me to get on and off from the tractor and the little bit I ran it, it'd give me grief. With my injuries I just didn't have the motions to be able to crawl around or work on it comfortably. Also needing any kind of pointers it was kind of hard to come by having friends and neighbors all being IH guys. I sold the tractor for more than I bought it for and what I had stuck into parts oddly. I bought a 1951 Farmall M in the area that I really liked and was comfortable on. For my personal preference with my injuries these are the differences I observed and noticed. Pros and Cons. Climbing up: Both the B and M have about the same step strid going from the draw bar to the axel housing to the platform. The M though has a wider drawbar and more space between the fender and seat vs the B. You had to pivot sideways to get on the B Plat form. Fenders: I feel safer and more secure with fenders. The B fenders sat up much higher than the M's. If I get a sore back I could hang onto and lean on a fender. The M's are pretty low. Seat: The B seat was solid and had a nice wrap around cushioned seat that hugged you. I felt very safe, and relaxed on it. Being skinny I fit in the seat well. For a larger person it might be a tight fit. The seat had zero suspension though, you see a lot of farmers standing up on these tractors in pictures and see why now. Your back takes the brunt of the shock. The M has a pan seat with a spring. The p.o put a cushion on it and it helps. With the spring I can push the seat down and it gives me an extra opft to get up or room to swing my leg. The spring helps with any shock but feel like I have a death grip on the steering wheel feeling like I could tip off. Clutch: The B has a hand Clutch vs the M with the foot clutch. The hand clutch was in the way trying to get onto the platform but seemed a little smoother to run. The foot clutch is out of the way and so much easier for backing up wagons. The B you could tighten the clutch very easily vs the M you couldn't it was split or nothing. Brakes: The B had brakes on each side vs the M on one side you could lock. Hood: To remove the hood on the B you have to remove the steering wheel, pull out the steering shaft, and loosen the bolts holding it on vs the M. You pull the 4 clips down. Hydraulics: The B had a lever on the left side of platform for the Hydraulics. There were special John Deere ports you needed or you could tap into the pump with pioneer adapters. My m has live Hydraulics and have a leaver by the throttle. Front end: The B had a roll a matic front end that each wheel moved up and down independently. The m doesn't have that, but I haven't noticed a difference. Battery: The battery on the B was under the seat. You had to balance on the draw bar and try to pull it up and over your head. The M it's right under the colom. Parts: Granted I have a jd dealer about 10 minutes away but you're paying for the color. Any farm store like TSC, Farm and Fleet or Fleet Farm have basic tractor parts and carry every brand except jd. I like looking at parts and sometimes need it right away. I don't like ordering online or driving to a dealer just for them to do the samething. This list isn't really based on design or something engineered but just what I noticed. Again 2 different tractors, 2 different sizes. Size: The B was easier to put gas in, it fit in the shop, it was pretty nibble parking it in a tight spot in the shed and doing field work didn't have to worry about low branches. The M being taller it's hard to reach the tank, I need to remove the muffler to get it into the shop, it's a pooch in tight areas, and need to be careful in fence lines. Sound: A lot of the family and passer bys enjoyed watching me do field work listening to the putt putt putt of B. At 1st I enjoyed it but it got old real fast and a few cases the wife came running into the shed thinking I had a shot gun when she heard the tractor backfire starving it. The M has a nice grunt to it, I'm not sure about a straight pipe on it or not I guess if people miss the 2 cylinder sound I could pull some spark plug wires. Being a 2 cylinder you had a 50/50 chance on figuring out compression, spark or firing issues also. Resale: When I was 1st looking at tractors any 2 cylinder JD rusted out, hardly running seemed to be going more than a farmall. Asking around on forums most responces, was the name/color and the 2 cylinders are more collectibles vs say an h or m that is still used. I kind of agree with that. You drive by any smaller farm yet and an h or m is on the hayrake, shuttling wagons, on a drill or running the pto no Jd A's or B's though. You might get more for a JD but you need the right buyer vs a working tractor someone would use. Style: The B was kind of boxy and the rims just seemed blah. The M has some nice curves and nice designed rims. All in all both tractors have it's pros and cons and did everything I wanted them to do but I feel like I'm way ahead on the M with my injuries.
    4 points
  13. Good lighting, concrete and less crawling on the ground. Still working on it.
    4 points
  14. Changed the oil last night in my 99 with the 7.3. Also finally got around to changing the brake light switch that has partially failed and as a result cruise, lock up convertor and shifter interlock would not work. I was dreading it, so put it off. Think I was recalling a switch that was a lot worse and was half scared not all my problems were related to the switch. Turned out it was very easy and it did indeed take care of the mentioned issues.
    4 points
  15. Found a bunch of these in great condition tucked away in my basement. Have lots more if anyone's interested in the PayLine series from the 1970's.
    3 points
  16. I appreciate all the responses on the 656 thread! This will be the first of 2 tractors this week to catch us up. The 660 was only available as a standard or wheatland machine. This beast was offered with 263 gas, LP gas or 282 diesel engines. It featured outboard planetary final drives and full coverage rear fenders. Power steering was available. This model is easy to recognize with the cast filler piece below the grille.
    3 points
  17. When I read the title to this thread I said to myself that there is no comparison between a JD B and an M. Apples to oranges kind of deal. You showed me wrong as there is a comparison between these tractors. Well done! And with or without injuries, you’re always way ahead on a Farmall 😂
    3 points
  18. Shep with me down at the garden
    3 points
  19. The big baby😀
    3 points
  20. My old Tators dog was that way. Dolly not so much but she always had Dude to guide her. Now that she is alone, she is much more likely to go with me. She even went in the truck with me Friday. I think she was 8 months old and helping me bale in the 1486
    3 points
  21. With a little luck it will be red tomorrow. Leaving for Rantoul next Wednesday morning. Plenty of time!
    3 points
  22. IH recommended shutting them down on gasoline for easier starting. the early Letter Series carbs had little petcock drains as opposed to the later ones that had 1/8" pipe plugs. I would guess to easily drain the distillate out if you needed to start it the heads were different only and carb was re jetted- IH flat top pistons . DWV would have better knowledge The manifolds had a heat shield and a manual heat riser. depending on the ambient temperature and the type of load required a manual adjustment with a wrench and jamb nut. I have never seen an operative heat riser flapper.The exhaust was routed through passages to assist the air fuel
    3 points
  23. Here's some guitars. All pictured were painted by the oldest. Hard to tell in the pictures but most have some kind of lace or metal flake paint job. All the electric guitars were purchased as kits and put together by him. The aluminum one was built from a 1/8 inch sheet of aluminum and a 2×12 body with the turning done with a wire cup brush in a drill. The neck was purchased off the internet. Both play but I think the oldest gets more enjoyment out of building them.
    3 points
  24. As I was drifting off to sleep last night, the meaning and great pun of my posts came to me, my error was not typing the the punch line "In my experience a spanner usually isn't a Good wrench" Hahaha, "punch" line
    3 points
  25. Did you say axes? Just kidding. Carry on 😁
    3 points
  26. Welp, the weekend plan took a different turn Friday (turned out to be for the better). The local Bomgaars had batteries on sale, so I snagged a couple and installed them Friday after replacing the engine oil, fuel, and coolant filter, and changing engine oil. The fuel looked and smelled good, so we cracked all the injector lines and cranked the engine over to get oil to where it needed to be and to blead the pump/lines. Once we tightened the injector lines, I bet it didn't make a half a revolution before it started and ran. Actually it ran really well...no smoke, no funny noises, no unexpected leaks or surprises. A new theory is emerging: it DID have a bad pump on it at one time, but it was replaced (as indicated by the "RENEWED" tag on the pump) and not everyone got the status update. Drove it home, changed the hydraulic filter (not milky), vacuumed all the mouse poop out and scrubbed the inside of the cab (that was a chore). Even the headlights and flashers work!
    3 points
  27. Lucy is a Red heeler/Australian cattle dog mix. She has a ton of energy. She'll go on a 3 mile walk, or chase the atv and a few minutes later wants to play fetch or chases her tail. My wife does agility contests with her. Her favorite activity though is going for rides or hanging out on something with wheels. When I was laid up for 6 months she never left my side in bed.
    3 points
  28. Had a BN, B, 1940 4 speed M, OS4 and OS6 in hibernation for too long and finally got them out and moving around again. Lot of cleaning carbs and parts but they all fire right up again like new
    3 points
  29. Got the 856 and the 'hog' out and worked over the creek-line and some field edges. Some of this stuff is taller than the stack!
    2 points
  30. Thanks to all who helped identify the rear axle in my ‘68 Chevy dump. Auto zone found EVERYTHING from the backing plate out. Ordinarily , they will argue with you all day that no one-ton Chevy has 4 wheel cylinders…. But knowing the axle model made all the difference. Thank you gentlemen.
    2 points
  31. A 1086 is a really good dog tractor. The back ledge behind the seat is pretty nice place for them too. our dog Hagan loved the 1086 and the 2290. Stacked hay with the 2290 and he would stand on the back ledge and put his chin on my shoulder. What a good dog can get by with. BTW my handle on here Hagan came from the Blue Healer Hagan we had.
    2 points
  32. Yes, iowaboy 1965, I did tucker myself out. But I'd worked every day for 12 days before the show getting ready too. So I went to the party with aching bones! It was a great time though. Gary😁
    2 points
  33. Awesome car!!! Good for him!! Those 55-57 Chevys are always cool. My friend has a 56 Chevy 210 sedan, not his first car but the nicest, fastest one he has built yet. It’s on a 1990 Caprice frame with a 2001 Chevy 2500 complete wiring harness, 6L engine and 4L80 transmission. Has a 10 bolt 8.5 posi differential with 3.73 gears. It’s a good performer. These pictures are from when I put new exhaust on it last year, the previous system I made had damage from a driveshaft failure and he wanted cutouts.
    2 points
  34. I go out walking after midnight Out in the moonlight just like we used to do I'm always walking after midnight, searching for you I walk for miles along the highway Well, that's just my way of saying, I love you I'm always walking after midnight, searching for you
    2 points
  35. Here's one from one of his co workers: when I first started at Dans sometimes when I’d come in off road. Rich would be in my office using the phone. Most techs did. One day after he was there I picked up my phone and the handle was all greasy! When I saw him I gave him crap about it. Week goes by I pull in and I can see him standing in my office on the phone. As I walk in he’s heading back to shop with that I did something bad grin of his. Little later phone rings and as it hits my ear I hear it make suction- he put a bead of black grease all the way around the ear end. Lol
    2 points
  36. Thats an early moonshine runner, it would be hard to outrun the revenuers, so best to outsmart them.
    2 points
  37. Putting some new headers on this ‘Cuda, think it’s a 1972, has a 340 and 727, not perfect but a really nice car, underside is awesome The job before this ‘Cuda was repairing a rear differential mount in a 2004 RAV4 that is very rotten, a car that I would typically say is not worth fixing but it just needs to last another couple weeks until I have the Honda Odyssey ready that they bought this weekend to replace the RAV4, the Odyssey is supposed to be here sometime this week. Was working on a 2014 Ram 1500 first thing today. It came here with complaints of noises and vibrations. The front differential output shafts were rusted and splines depleted, CV shafts falling off. Only way to get the output shafts are with a complete differential from Mopar, about $3000. I found some aftermarket shafts on Amazon that are made by a Canadian company with CV axles for about $1000, put them in a while back and I’ve been chasing a terrible driveline vibration in it since. In my efforts to isolate the vibration I found the transfer case clutch(auto 4x4) was slipping, found this while driving it with the front driveshaft only. It would not positively drive and when it engaged it would shudder/vibrate bad. I put a new used transfer case in it today and it vibrates less but still too much. I put a new transmission mount in as well because it was delaminated, motor mounts look ok, a couple u joints are a little sticky but with my efforts to isolate the problem by running the front and/or rear driveshaft only the u joints aren’t the biggest problem. I had only the front driveshaft installed and decided to get my daughter to hold the brakes and load it up while in gear while I watch the motor mounts. She was nervous about running me over, proud of her for thinking about that, but I assured her that I would watching from the side, not in front. While we were doing this operation a loud bang happened and there was no drive, the passenger side front differential output shaft sheared off. I was starting to wonder if the new CV axles are the cause of the vibration but was reluctant to take them out because of the work involved but I think that’s my next step now, if I have to contact the company for warranty on the output shaft I may as well prove that I don’t need axles too. I figured this ‘Cuda was exceptional enough to share, and then thought sharing my other jobs of the day would be a good example of the variety of work I get in to.
    2 points
  38. There’s no place I’d rather be than right here with my redneck, white socks, and blue ribbon beer.
    2 points
  39. Dad always called it tractor fuel too, in between expletives about how lousy the tractor ran on it. We filled both tanks with gas and used the little tank to get back to the fuel barrel if the big tank ran dry
    2 points
  40. Made an ag bag. Will see how we like feeding out of it over the winter. Didn't realize how much hp the bagger would take. Worked the 5250 pretty hard.
    2 points
  41. Put the 1300 on the M today, and took care of some pasture, and misc. mowing that needed done.
    2 points
  42. Mowed off a couple small cow lots that were fairly rank. No trees or anything but haven’t been mowed off in years. 7’ Bush Hog brand mower.
    2 points
  43. Hydraulic log cut off saw. It broke the bolts off holding the bar to the swivel plate. Had to remove the swivel plate to get the bolts out. 3/4'x3", four of them. Got them out and replaced with grade 8 day before yesterday and torqued to 280lbs. Decided to recheck the torque yesterday and all of them turned over a 1/4 of a round to achieve 280lbs. Went to Cat this morning and got grade 10.8 and torqued to 340lbs. The cutter bar on this is over 5ft. long and heavy. i believe they are cycling it too fast.
    2 points
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