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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/13/2022 in all areas

  1. What is a battery?' I think Tesla said it best when they called it an Energy Storage System. That's important. They do not make electricity – they store electricity produced elsewhere, primarily by coal, uranium, natural gas-powered plants, or diesel-fueled generators. So, to say an EV is a zero-emission vehicle is not at all valid. Also, since forty percent of the electricity generated in the U.S. is from coal-fired plants, it follows that forty percent of the EVs on the road are coal-powered, do you see? Einstein's formula, E=MC2, tells us it takes the same amount of energy to move a five-thousand-pound gasoline-driven automobile a mile as it does an electric one. The only question again is what produces the power? To reiterate, it does not come from the battery; the battery is only the storage device, like a gas tank in a car. There are two orders of batteries, rechargeable, and single-use. The most common single-use batteries are A, AA, AAA, C, D. 9V, and lantern types. Those dry-cell species use zinc, manganese, lithium, silver oxide, or zinc and carbon to store electricity chemically. Please note they all contain toxic, heavy metals. Rechargeable batteries only differ in their internal materials, usually lithium-ion, nickel-metal oxide, and nickel-cadmium. The United States uses three billion of these two battery types a year, and most are not recycled; they end up in landfills. California is the only state which requires all batteries be recycled. If you throw your small, used batteries in the trash, here is what happens to them. All batteries are self-discharging. That means even when not in use, they leak tiny amounts of energy. You have likely ruined a flashlight or two from an old, ruptured battery. When a battery runs down and can no longer power a toy or light, you think of it as dead; well, it is not. It continues to leak small amounts of electricity. As the chemicals inside it run out, pressure builds inside the battery's metal casing, and eventually, it cracks. The metals left inside then ooze out. The ooze in your ruined flashlight is toxic, and so is the ooze that will inevitably leak from every battery in a landfill. All batteries eventually rupture; it just takes rechargeable batteries longer to end up in the landfill. In addition to dry cell batteries, there are also wet cell ones used in automobiles, boats, and motorcycles. The good thing about those is, ninety percent of them are recycled. Unfortunately, we do not yet know how to recycle single-use ones properly. But that is not half of it. For those of you excited about electric cars and a green revolution, I want you to take a closer look at batteries and also windmills and solar panels. These three technologies share what we call environmentally destructive embedded costs. Everything manufactured has two costs associated with it, embedded costs and operating costs. I will explain embedded costs using a can of baked beans as my subject. In this scenario, baked beans are on sale, so you jump in your car and head for the grocery store. Sure enough, there they are on the shelf for $1.75 a can. As you head to the checkout, you begin to think about the embedded costs in the can of beans. The first cost is the diesel fuel the farmer used to plow the field, till the ground, harvest the beans, and transport them to the food processor. Not only is his diesel fuel an embedded cost, so are the costs to build the tractors, combines, and trucks. In addition, the farmer might use a nitrogen fertilizer made from natural gas. Next is the energy costs of cooking the beans, heating the building, transporting the workers, and paying for the vast amounts of electricity used to run the plant. The steel can holding the beans is also an embedded cost. Making the steel can requires mining taconite, shipping it by boat, extracting the iron, placing it in a coal-fired blast furnace, and adding carbon. Then it's back on another truck to take the beans to the grocery store. Finally, add in the cost of the gasoline for your car. A typical EV battery weighs one thousand pounds, about the size of a travel trunk. It contains twenty-five pounds of lithium, sixty pounds of nickel, 44 pounds of manganese, 30 pounds cobalt, 200 pounds of copper, and 400 pounds of aluminum, steel, and plastic. Inside are over 6,000 individual lithium-ion cells. It should concern you that all those toxic components come from mining. For instance, to manufacture each EV auto battery, you must process 25,000 pounds of brine for the lithium, 30,000 pounds of ore for the cobalt, 5,000 pounds of ore for the nickel, and 25,000 pounds of ore for copper. All told, you dig up 500,000 pounds of the earth's crust for just one battery." Sixty-eight percent of the world's cobalt, a significant part of a battery, comes from the Congo. Their mines have no pollution controls, and they employ children who die from handling this toxic material. Should we factor in these diseased kids as part of the cost of driving an electric car?" I'd like to leave you with these thoughts. California is building the largest battery in the world near San Francisco, and they intend to power it from solar panels and windmills. They claim this is the ultimate in being 'green,' but it is not! This construction project is creating an environmental disaster. Let me tell you why. The main problem with solar arrays is the chemicals needed to process silicate into the silicon used in the panels. To make pure enough silicon requires processing it with hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrogen fluoride, trichloroethane, and acetone. In addition, they also need gallium, arsenide, copper-indium-gallium- diselenide, and cadmium-telluride, which also are highly toxic. Silicone dust is a hazard to the workers, and the panels cannot be recycled. Windmills are the ultimate in embedded costs and environmental destruction. Each weighs 1688 tons (the equivalent of 23 houses) and contains 1300 tons of concrete, 295 tons of steel, 48 tons of iron, 24 tons of fiberglass, and the hard to extract rare earths neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium. Each blade weighs 81,000 pounds and will last 15 to 20 years, at which time it must be replaced. We cannot recycle used blades. Sadly, both solar arrays and windmills kill birds, bats, sea life, and migratory insects. There may be a place for these technologies, but you must look beyond the myth of zero emissions. I predict EVs and windmills will be abandoned once the embedded environmental costs of making and replacing them become apparent. "Going Green" may sound like the Utopian ideal and are easily espoused, catchy buzzwords, but when you look at the hidden and embedded costs realistically with an open mind, you can see that Going Green is more destructive to the Earth's environment than meets the eye, for sure.
    7 points
  2. Built a spreader bar to try to lift panels down tomorrow afternoon. Dunno how far I can get but I'll try . Crane truck is a 466 powered Allison auto IH tandem truck.
    6 points
  3. By far the best way to find any lost item is to replace it.
    6 points
  4. After all of my bills are paid every month I have only a bit of a coin left......
    5 points
  5. Getting our girls ready to go for another season. Always liked the old school front fenders, but my Dad didn't at all. Needless to say we never had any because he didn't like them. Now that it is my two boys and myself we are hunting up fenders. Just put this set on one of our 1486's. We hand make our own mounting so they sit properly over the wheels. These will get a paint job like the set on one of our 66's eventually. Kinda hard to find them around anymore that are not all bent. Just a little tractor porn on a winter day for y'all.
    4 points
  6. Where can I order one of those "new in box" Willys Jeeps? I very much need one. Or two.
    4 points
  7. That last pic looks familiar Gary. I have a couple that are a similar setup framed here. I had to leave the light off to take the pics so it wouldn’t glare.
    4 points
  8. #1, always thought it would be entertaining, they cut off open snowmobiling in the park to curb emissions 20 yrs ago... and BOOM! Lots of crispy vegan cross country skier types. #3, Oh sweet Saint of San Andreas, hear our prayers.
    4 points
  9. These are the small version. We just did them on a friends 686. He had the ones like DT Fan has on his 756 and didn't like them as they were too big. He saw ours on the 1466 and said man I would like a mini version of those. Well, we happened to have a set in the shed and no small tractor to put them on. So his kids hired us to put them on his 686 for Christmas. I like his kids!
    3 points
  10. Do you know that the citizens of MN wish the same things citizens of ND wish for......a professional football team. I'm still boycotting the NFL so I ain't watching. I am having a super bowl party. Any one who shows up with a veggie tray will be charged with unnecessary roughage!
    3 points
  11. And finally we have some relatives up in AB Canada not too far north of us. Back in the day when they took up a homesteaded around 1910, they found a coal seam on their place. It was a godsend because they had a source of fuel and they could sell it to other homesteads. We ourselves had to haul by horse/wagon coal from a local coal mine 8 miles away and we were lucky to be that close to a source of coal. They started just with pick axes and horse drawn Fresnos but as you can see, as technology improved, they moved up to more modern machinery and methods. Coal was a legitimate source of fuel around here right through WW II.
    3 points
  12. Next door cousins TD 18A. That is our farm in the background. They farmed with this and a D7. Started putting them to pasture when they bought their first JD 6030. They still have both crawlers.
    3 points
  13. Taken between 1942 and 1947. This was our lineup. The Cat is a R4. Distallate burning W9 is the IH. Even the W9 had more drawbar hp on paper, the R4 would match it in the field.
    3 points
  14. Ok then what do you call this. Picture one is our TD 14A dozing dirt or manure near the old hog barn. Picture 2 is the same crawler with the blade removed and hooked to a 22ft plow.
    3 points
  15. Getting ready to short block this bad boy. Making a tapered ring compressor from that cracked sleeve, checking ring gaps which I figured weren’t going to be an issue with the liners being at Max recommend size, I don’t even need feeler gauges to see that gap won’t be closing up! I think she’ll be fine for a polished turd!
    3 points
  16. Since it is snowing here I thought this one fits mother natures mood The Snowmobile Company, Inc. of West Ossipee, NH, manufactured a winter sled modification for Model T trucks and sold them through Ford dealerships.
    3 points
  17. One of the ways go thru the upper peninsula of michigan. Well worth the extra 2 hours...
    3 points
  18. In the late ‘50s - early ‘60s I ran one of those as an agricultural prime mover, pulled a 5 bottom trailer plow or a big disc/cultimulcher combination. Rated at 150 hp I was speed-limited as to how fast I could plow, could easily throw the dirt out of the furrow. The farm was operated by two brothers, they bought 3 of them surplus. One modification was to run 2 exhaust stacks up through the hood….loud even with 2 Farmall M mufflers!! Fuel consumption was a little over 5 gallons per hour. I ran them often at night, there would be a blue flame about 6-8” long out of both stacks and the manifold would glow red, it would light a cigarette. Two of them still exist; tracks are impossible to get, they are rubber with cables imbedded in them, the cables stretch and when you run out of adjustment you’re going to throw a track, I could walk them back on but that is one of the reasons they were retired. It was pretty big deal for me as a skinny 16 year old to operate the biggest ag machine in the area.
    3 points
  19. Watch for the guy in the middle....................😆
    2 points
  20. The M-2 High Speed Tractor would not do well with a blade, the suspension was very ‘soft’, without a load on the drawbar any acceleration (it had a foot throttle as well as a hand throttle) would cause the front end to ‘rock’ up in the air, brakes caused it to nose dive - but it was a very smooth ride.
    2 points
  21. I have pictures of my 1256W and the best I could with my 1066 in the shed at 5 below!🥶 I’ll start at the alternator, going back! Bear with me!! At the alternator, I connect my wires, leaving a little slack, run harness up between block and alternator, bring harness up between adjusting bracket and thermostat housing. then there should be a welded clamp to the air filter housing stand to clamp harness run harness up over the center of filter housing, or wherever it fits best. My 1066 goes over the top right intake hose going to turbo. I believe the 766 goes over the top center of fuel tank like a 10-1466. Can probably leave a little slack between filter housing and tank, I usually do. Here is the 1256, a little different, but similar being all harnesses connect behind the fuel tank. Drop the rear harness down in the center of the steering column wherever it looks to fit the best, where shift linkage and other moving parts won’t rub on it. I came out on the left side of the linkage rods going into the top of the transmission on my 1066, just find the most open area you can bring the harness to the front right side of the speed trans cover and loop it from right to left, under the back of the starter to feed it out the rear of the bottom of the steering column out the rear bring the harness to the left of the range shift cover near the clutch pedal to the harness clamp and then out to the left rear to connect fender harnesses The dash panel harnesses, it’s all trial and error! Every time I redo dash harnesses, I get things where I think they belong, put it in place on the column, and see if changes need to be made. Make necessary changes if any, put it back in place and check the fit again. Being the dash harnesses are new, and straight, it’s hard to tell exactly how they fit, so just do some trial fits, and do the best you can! When I wired the 706W, I think I test fit the panels 5-6 times to get things where I thought the harness and wires fit the best. Good luck! If you need more pictures, or clarification, just let me know! hopefully the diagram is legible!
    2 points
  22. It took me 32 years to have the opportunity to start my own cow herd. My Daughter got it done in 5. She purchased heifer #81 from our neighbor and my Wife and I gave her #31 out of our fall calf crop. Her purple (her favorite color) ear tags finally came in so we tagged them today. She was pretty happy.
    2 points
  23. Ugh! Great, now I have ANOTHER antique tool to go and find. Thanks a lot. Jerk.
    2 points
  24. jeeper61, Those were very popular around central Montana. Our Rural Route 2 mailman, Harry Peterson had one. This one I'm picturing was my Moore, Montana baseball coach, Virgil Jennings.' This is his Model TT Ford Ton Truck with a snowmobile set up on it for his "day job." His wife Edna is posing with it. Gary😁 PS: I notice he had tire chains on the rear tires.
    2 points
  25. My Mom lived along the tracks in the 30s and 40s Grandpa was a Postmaster. She told me about picking up coal along the tracks for heat
    2 points
  26. You might want to try the sticky red plugs made by Balkamp....no glue to add I bought a big box (50 ct I think) twenty or so years ago, I still have several left, they haven't dried up at all in plastic bag once in the tire they last for the life of a road tire.
    2 points
  27. I don’t even know what teams are playing....
    2 points
  28. Better double mask. N95 with surgical over it. Or look up the recipe for Peking Duck
    2 points
  29. Can't get it up needs a new cable
    2 points
  30. 2 Cylinder Detroit Diesel, I can Hear the thing from Here!! Several of these units working for the Local Drain Commision when I was a Kid, That Detroit Diesel Sound Travelled across the County's "Drain Cleaning Project's" Those fella's started in the Fall of the Year and ended when the digging got tougher from the Winter freeze,...then Restarted at the first Hint of Old Man Winters release of Cold Temps. Frozen Fields, Tree's without leaves and snow covered frozen Hill sides, Allowed the 2 Cylinder Detroit Engines Exhaust Note to Carry for Miles from those old Cable operated Diggers!! My 2 Cents, Jim Droscha
    2 points
  31. And you don't have to mess with Chicago
    2 points
  32. Yes, IH's first "real" pickup was the model D-1 of 1933 built by Willys Overland in Toledo. It was replaced by the model C-1 built by IH at Springfield, OH in 1934.
    2 points
  33. So we got this today
    2 points
  34. Here are a few advertisements. Interesting they don't have the red panel and stickers.
    2 points
  35. I was real close to buying a Allis wd about a month ago, biggest drawback for me is it has to have a fast hitch for a yard tractor. It's way too handy to not use a jack to hook things up.
    2 points
  36. Well, since you all showed yours, guess I'll show mine. The one on the left is a Gerber, made by Fiskars. Used to carry it backpacking. Now if splits kindling for the stove. Nice and light, but too small to limb with. Had it a long time. Middle one is a Wetterlings. Supposed to be a good one. All I've done with it is split kindling. I carried it a little bit backpacking, but the Gerber (Fiskars) is lighter and has a longer handle. One on the right is obviously an Eastwing. I've used it when we've cut timber to mark log lengths and then remove the bark at the cut before cutting them into logs (saves chains). It works decent for limbing small stuff. It is too small to drive felling wedges, though. So I still carry a 2.5 lb axe with full length handle for driving wedges. I used to carry the Eastwing in my toolbox when I was into 4-wheeling. I've cut some decent sized blowdowns out of the road, in a pinch.
    2 points
  37. I have a don't know how old 77 that was sold new and lived it's life down here on the river. I am the third owner. It has always started easy and motor impressed me as running quiet and smooth as a sewing machine. With a pto pump it just may find new life powering the hyd chute.
    2 points
  38. Got some of the red sprayed today. Hope to get the rest done tomorrow.
    2 points
  39. Just picked this up an hour ago. Test ride showed me just how loose a bike can get at 130,000 miles That’s how you change a problem tire. 😂
    2 points
  40. Happy Valentine's Day if I don't get back here before then. twostepn2001, here are some Overland examples. I took this photo at Belgrade, MT one year. This is a Model 86 Overland Touring Car with jump seats in the back end. Here is an Overland Model 38 Speedster from the factory. Here is a Willys Overland truck built for International Harvester, I'm told. This is a Willys Overland in kit form. This is what the kit looks like when assembled. (After being pushed out of the rear doors of a Flying Boxcar. Gary😁
    2 points
  41. Bitcoin mining is a close relative of shoveling unicorn sh!t
    2 points
  42. Nebo makes some good stuff, personally i find head lamps more versatile than ordinary flashlights.
    2 points
  43. All F-12 had the webbed front bolster up to serial # FB 11756 built June 7, 1934 bolster was revised to solid. As they had problems with the webbed bolster cracking. You could bring your tractor in and get a new bolster installed as part of a service program. So many early bolsters have been changed, I have two Waukesha F-12 one with and one without webbed bolster. I can't say for sure on the front wheel have some single front wheels as Billy O. showed Rubber and spooked steel wheels, but no round spook as you have.
    2 points
  44. We are now paying the piper for 30 years of sending our mfg overseas.
    2 points
  45. And they can’t figure out why there’s not enough drivers.
    2 points
  46. Ring compressor made up, Two slugs installed and rods torqued. ~0.002” clearance on the rod bearings. Crank looks decent. She’ll go around.
    1 point
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