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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/02/2022 in all areas

  1. Here is a bit more about how early roads were built and the Adams Leaning Wheel graders. Some of these early roads were built by digging a trench (ditch) and casting the dirt up into the center of what will be the road bed. The Adams Leaning Wheel graders shifted the pitch of the wheels so they would lean into the cut and be able to move more fill into the center of the road than the conventional graders of the time. The first photo below shows a 30-60 Aultman Taylor tractor pulling 2 Adams graders and you can see how the wheels could be angled as needed. The second photo shows a Cat 60 building a road with single large Adams Leaning Wheel grader. The graders were were the most common way the early roads were constructed with the larger and more elaborate Elevating Graders (also known as Muckers) being the other primary machine to build roads. The Elevating Graders were basically a plow that dug into the ground and the dirt it lifted up would go onto a belt and be elevated into a wagon alongside the machine. The wagon would then dump the dirt where needed. The first photo shows a Big Four pulling a Mucker. The next three have a family history will me. My Dad started in 1927 working for the Leon Joyce Construction Co. as a mule skinner and these photos are of the outfit he worked for. The first photo shows an Elevating Grader being pulled by mules, the second shows a Mucker being pulled by a Cat 60 with horses/mules used to carry the dirt away and the last photo shows the progress to "cat wagons" being pulled by Cat 30's. My dad is running the Cat 30 and wagon in the left side of the last photo. He used to say he went from a "mule skinner to a cat skinner in just three years".
    4 points
  2. Twist you up faster than 80's banker
    3 points
  3. Have not had the sleds out much for the last few years. I lost the urge, which is sad since that was my hobby for many years. Maybe I will see how they are.
    2 points
  4. Fenders and front weights now with less than a week until farm show.
    2 points
  5. My thoughts too, get out of his way this man's on a mission, hope your previous employer appreciated your skills not so easy to come by these days Looking forward to a noisy burnout with a shower of sparks instead of smoke😁
    2 points
  6. Dag nab it Anson, I sure wish we didn't live 875 miles apart, on opposite sides of the country. First off, I'm sure we would have a lot more frequent and animated "Blue Smoke" discussions if we could do it face to face. Another thing . . . I think I'd try to sneak that Adams Leaning Wheel Grader out of your rusty iron refuge some afternoon when you were taking a nap. I've been looking for a medium size one for years but only find the big 12+' ones that are too big for my old tractors. I've found several small/mid-sized Russel and Adams graders but none of the Leaning Wheel version. My Dad used to use Adams Leaning Wheel graders back in the 1920' & 30's to build roads. He always said the Adam L W grader was the only one that could cut a ditch in hard ground and could build a road faster/better than anything else on the market at that time. I'm guessing if I put some Yankee greenbacks in your hand that maybe ?? you'd part with it. Too bad that the transportation cost up to my part of the country would put a kibosh on the deal. By the way, how wide is that blade . . 8'? How about a couple photos of the front showing it's patented leaning/steering system?
    2 points
  7. i think i got this, i dont have to act or anything i am a dumb farmer - i have been agriculturally and livestock challenged all my life.
    2 points
  8. I built to screen topsoil that I pushed into a pile for the new house build . I did find a gravel deposit on the property and have only put that stuff through it so far and was able to get about 25-30 yards of gravel in 2hours through the screener. I'm guessing that I still have 5-600 yards that could be in the ground to screen
    1 point
  9. Here in Western Canada ,"winter" diesel is available from about 18th November .It is a mix of No1 and No2 diesel,No1 being predominately Kerosene .No 2 diesel(summer) is okay down to about minus 15-19C before it will gel.If you have a fuel filter heater system if will extend it by about 5 degree C lower .Winter diesel in canada still has a pour point of about minus 40 C before it begins to "cloud" ie ,the parrafin wax which occurs naturally in the fuel has started to crystalize and hence it looks "cloudy" and will start to plug the fuel filter. Normaly a little below the "cloud" point temp,you will get the CFPP.that is Cold Filter Plug Point,predicated on the temp the fuel will not pass thru a 45 micron filter. This is not to be confused with diesel "icing" which occurs due to the presence of water crystals in the fuel, and will also cause the fuel to be unable to pass thru the filter,thus causing similiar symptoms.The No1 diesel is lighter ,more volatile and has slightly less energy than No2; 135,000 BTU,s per gallon to 139,000 BTU,s for No2 diesel. I personally have operated Cats and heavy equipment at much lower temps than minus 40 (minus 55 C for 14 days on one job in the late 70,s back when we ran with no fancy girlie glass cabs like today,just ROP,S cab with lots of tarps etc) and everything kept running 24/7 .This is just a brief description of cold weather fuel issues, and one could go into it in a lot more detail.
    1 point
  10. Working on the steering and radius rods today. The axle is flipped to front steer, we looked at keeping it rear steer but there’s just too much interference with the steering drag link, the tie rod and engine. Also the original radius rod setup was a wishbone which won’t work here. We’re going to use rubber mounted radius rods and with the play in the axle pivot pin there should be no binding. Also have to drill two holes in the axle so the rods clear everything. That will be one of the first parts that required altering from stock but they can always be filled and made to “go away”.
    1 point
  11. Little smaller than that last bit you had
    1 point
  12. Looks great! Could use a couple more of those slab weights.
    1 point
  13. Spent about an hour and a half brazing on this thing today, not done but getting close. I think all of the holes are covered, still need to finish some of the bigger patches. Hoping the parts I ordered last week come in this week. Should be ready to cut grass come April.
    1 point
  14. Sled is in the heated shop so I went out for a few hours. Was beautiful out. My phone showed -30 when I took this pic but it sure didn’t feel like it. No anti gel was needed 😂😂
    1 point
  15. Roger, You are correct about what happened. I don't think the 1913 50 hp Case was boosted to 150 psi operating pressure yet. I'd explained how the boiler of the 15, the 45 and the 50 were basically identical lap seam boilers, other than the length of the smoke boxes on the 45 & 50 being longer than the 15 hp. The 15 and 45 hp Case engines maximum operating pressure was 130 psi. The first year of the 50 hp was 130 psi also. The cast iron smokestacks went with the lap seam boilers in 1913. In 1914, Case put a butt strap boiler under their 50 hp engines, plus a steel smokestack, and that is when they boosted the operating pressure to 150 psi. But that 20 psi on top of the 130 made a difference in its performance too. I have several hours on a 50 hp Case and they are one fine engine. I got to take Austin Monk's 50 hp Case for a spin on his first steam up, along with others. We had an oops later and Austin had to fire up his 930 Case diesel to pull us out. I couldn't see what my steersman was headed into and he didn't holler soon enough for me to shut the throttle. The front wheel made it by on top of the culvert. But the rear wheel didn't. This engine of Austin's was actually a 1913 with the lap seam boiler and cast iron smokestack. He traded a junk boiler he had on hand for this pristine 1914 butt strap boiler at the Montana School Of Mines in Butte, America. He had to lengthen the water heater around 4 inches, and had to come up with a cast iron base for a steel smokestack and ring. So, his 1913 became a 1914 Case 50. I bought the old lap seam boiler from Austin and was going to put it under our 15 hp Case. John Schrock talked me out of that transfer and into putting in a new "ogee" mud ring. He then hauled the boiler to Michigan for one of his friends to use on their Case engine. That was about 10 years ago and the last I heard, that boiler was still setting in one spot just like it had at Mike's place at Silver Creek. Gary😉 PS: The Montana Boiler Inspector gave this boiler the original 150 psi for operating pressure. That's "pristine!"
    1 point
  16. Sailor, I worked in the parts department of a Detroit shop for several years. Those engines are amazing! They can be nearly worn out and still run well. Parts availability on them is excellent as well. I am enjoying your build very much!
    1 point
  17. Hope they can figure out the source of pain and relieve and your lungs come around to get off oxygen, no fun and life can change fast
    1 point
  18. After sitting all summer at the farm other than a trip to town just to charge the batteries and circulate the oil I used the ole Ford this week to bring my little New Holland tractor to the new homestead. I have several chores around here I need it for. The Ford is going to get oil changed soon as I have 4 gallons of Schaffer 15-40 for it and a new motorcraft filter. I still need to replace those cab mounts too. I do really like the way this truck pulls the trailer.
    1 point
  19. Happy to do so. This thread has been exactly what I'd hoped it'd be. Gus seems from all the posts about him, to have also been all you could have hoped for. Like many other things, a relationship with a dog is a result of what you put in. I've said it a million times but I'll say it again. It's not a coincidence that they're so great. I think God wants us to have examples of pure love, since humans aren't great at doing it ourselves, so we have dogs. In honor of Gus, I'm gonna go snuggle Franklin super tight and scratch his head for a long time this morning. Happy New Year to you Sandhiller. You're a good dude.
    1 point
  20. Out of respect for Betty White who passed away today, New Years Eve 2021, take her advice please for tonight. I always enjoyed Betty's acting and her ability to act so naïve. Rest In Peace, Betty. Gary 😢
    1 point
  21. Yes, Roger, I corrected that omission. Thanks for correcting ME though. The gearing only affected the ability to pull something, over the 45 or 15 hp engines. It had a higher brake horsepower due to the extra 25 pounds of operating pressure. And, 25 pounds on top of the lesser amount makes one heck of a difference. Happy New Year! Gary😉
    1 point
  22. Roger, young man, Thank you so much for your involved post. I followed it to a tee! I so appreciate the time it took you to gather, think through and post that type of information. I forgot to mention how "Steam Horsepower" originally began. It was very unsophisticated, but is how it began. Before there were many engines to turn the very early threshing machines that were "Hand Fed" and some were beginning to use a drag stacker, the number of horses powering that "carousel" Horse Power, those horses determined the horsepower of the steam engine replacing them. This was a Minneapolis model of the "Dingee Woodbury" carousel patent. This photo shows the arms the horses were harnessed to. This little threshing machine is the earliest one I've ran and observed operating, was at the Mehmke Museum about 30 years ago. Bundle's bands were cut by hand by the man hand feeding it. The straw at the right rear is threshed. I can picture someone with a wooden pitchfork pitching the spent straw away from the back end of the machine in the olden days. Here are a variety of "horsepower" carousel units powering those early threshing machines. Originally, Steam Engine Horse Power was figured by the number of horses turning a Dingee Woodbury carousel, and the horsepower of the engine replacing those horses. If twelve horses were turning a threshing machine and a steam engine was brought in that would handle the threshing machine... IT WAS a 12 horsepower engine. I've posted this photo several times in the past. It involves my late steam mentor and great friend, Walter Fred Mehmke on their Highwood, Montana farm. Walter is the baby at right being held by his Grandpa Mehmke. These are the units ready for transport. I took this photo at Cedar Falls, Iowa in 1958 of an Aultman-Taylor early hand fed, slat stacker threshing machine that its horsepower unit turned a drive belt and not a shaft drive like the rest of the ones above showed. Thank YOU again, Roger. Anson, I hope you have steam traction engine horsepower in your head clearly now? PS: I do know this 1909 Case engine is 15 steam horsepower turning this McCormick-Deering threshing machine. PPS: But this is a 1910 45 horsepower Case steam engine. The engine proper (motor) is identical to our 15 horsepower above, with 9" X 10" bore and stroke. The boiler tubes are interchangeable and have the same cubic feet of heating surface there and in the firebox. They will interchange from running gear to running gear. The "smoke box" chamber below the smokestack is a few inches longer on the 45 hp engine. Now anyone reading Roger's and my posts should know all there is to be known about steam horsepower. This is a 1913 Case 50 horsepower engine threshing. The 50 utilized taller drive wheels and gearing, gaining power. But it the same "motor" and boiler (with boosted steam pressure) as the 45 horsepower, and the 15 horsepower. Go figure. This is Abner D. Baker's Prony Brake he built to test his Baker steam engines on, back in the day. He donated it to the National Thresher's Association years ago. The brake band around the spinning drum, (with water/oil coolant inside) with the beam scale measuring the pressure applied to the drum is the principle used to figure horsepower. The Prony Brake went back in the early production of steam and gas engine tractors. This is an IHC tractor on a Prony Brake at Winnipeg, Canada, in the early days of those horsepower and efficiency (coal and water usage) trials of the early 20th century's teens. Likely the most colorful Prony Brake operator of the steam hobby era is this late friend of mine, Amos Rixmann. I took this photo of him at Rollag, Minnesota. He explained everything so greatly. He's watching the scale and has his hand on the crank wheel that tightened the band. I just wish he hadn't always called me after midnight on work nights! I first met him at the 50th National Thresher's Association show in 1994. I had to put this photo here. This was the Smolik Brother's 40-140 hp Reeves engine on the Prony Brake at Osage, Iowa August 2007. That was also the day I met Mr. Roger Byrne, and his 1914 Model T Ford! PS: son Mike is in the cab with the Reeves engine's caretaker, Jim Bodenham and just had returned from plowing. Gary😁
    1 point
  23. Brazed on this thing for a couple hours today. Probably half way done with the patching. The heat from the torch is warping things pretty bad, will have to do some serious straightening. Went to Grinnell and picked up the new idler pulley and torsion spring. Had to order the three spindle pulleys. May actually have this thing back together in time to mow this spring. Next thread I need to post is rebuilding the steering on a 782.
    1 point
  24. They had to put it on the flat bed to get it turned around in the space they had there
    1 point
  25. A little more progress after rearranging things so that the hoods could lineup.
    1 point
  26. I finally had a chance to make a little progress on this project. Today I reintroduced Mr engine to Mr frame, all in all it didn't go too bad. I didnt mar up the new paint too bad, well it had almost nine months to cure so that helps. I also installed a few small parts. Hopefully I can keep the progress a little more frequent now that this hurdle is overcome.
    1 point
  27. It was a great evening for myself and the tractor. When I came in for the night, my wife could tell I had fun "playing with my tractor ". My smile must have been huge!
    1 point
  28. I arrived home this evening and Dad had the 100 hooked to the disk. He had greased every zerk he could find on both the tractor and the disk. He lubricated the door hinges and the throttle lever. He even cleaned all the cab windows! I drove up to his place (half mile) and dropped it into the cornstalks. I was running on the low side of the gearbox, throttle at PTO speed on the tach and the the F/R lever on the blue mark on the guage. I opened both side windows to let the smell of the dirt inside. I was impressed with the hydraulic system: the disk popped out of the ground quickly and engaged the dirt just as efficiently! I could tell the engine and hydro were having a nice workout. The temperature guage was running higher than I expected, but it never got hot. I probably need to wash out the radiator and hydraulic cooler. Years hauling hay with a loader, bound to be dirt in there. When I let it idle to cool off afterwards, the engine sounded happy and no traces of black from the stack. The rings likely needed a good workout! Tomorrow, back onto the auger again.
    1 point
  29. Finished painting the frame. Now to start assembly
    1 point
  30. Finally got to make some forward progress on this project today. I took the frame to the shop at work and used their sandblaster to clean the frame. It cleaned up really nice and only took four bags of sand. After blasting I brought it back home and hit it with multiple coats of self etching primer. I'll leave it sit for a couple days and give it it's black coat.
    1 point
  31. I had some time this afternoon so I tried my luck at broken bolt removal. The first was for the bracket that holds the front diff to the frame. I welded a bolt to the remaining stud, let it cool sufficiently, and carefully tried it and it broke loose and I was able to remove it. Success! The second one was on the frame rail where the seat bracket bolts to the frame. There wasn't enough stud sticking up to weld to so I opted to grind it smooth and drill it out. After i drilled through it I was able to knock the rest out with a hammer and punch. This hole along with the other one on this bracket will be retapped to 1/4 inch when the time comes for assembly. Next step, sandblasting and painting.
    1 point
  32. FINALLY! I got a chance to make a little progress on this project. It's snowing outside so I decided to start a fire in the woodstove and work on this today. I pretty much got the frame ready for sandblasting with the exception of two broken bolts that I need to remove. That required finishing the removal of the wire harness, head light/instrument panel, handlebars and cables, nerf bars, rear axle assembly, and other various small mounting brackets. I wasn't planning on removing the stearing tube but I ended up taking it off anyway, it will make it easier to clean and paint the frame. Hopefully in the upcoming weeks I will be able to put more time on this project.
    1 point
  33. I have used urethane spring bushings in the past and always regretted it. Not too long and they start squeaking like a mouse in a cats mouth. Id go with rubber cab bushings.
    1 point
  34. I believe there are 2 different fan clutches available for the 6.0, look for the one that came with the plow package.
    1 point
  35. Around here if it's got a name on the door you are subject to a DOT stop. I see DOT with the landscapers pulled over all the time and they are usually just a pick up with a car trailer and a couple of zero turns. Pick up or car it doesn't matter if your driving a "commercial" vehicle there going to check you out. Pulled me over on a Sunday in 3/4 ton pick up Farm plated with a dump trailer. Went over everything on the truck and trailer and pulled the portable scale out. What an A-hole he was, it was all good he wasn't happy about that.
    1 point
  36. 26001 on combined or 10,000 trailer. Thats federal. Not state. I am not saying you cant do whatever you want. DOT is starting to check these hotshot drivers more as there are getting to be more of them all the time. 1 ton truck with a tandem dually gooseneck and start running around the country. Probably can get away with it until you don't.
    1 point
  37. Firebaugh Equipment Co . My neck of the woods ! About 25 miles North west of me . in its day that area was next town over of Mendota, Ca. the Cantaloupe capital of the world and was heavy in Alfalfa and Cotton , canning tomatoes. Cantaloupes . there were many hydro’ s used in cantaloupe and hay harvesting , there was a V.C.Britton Co that chopped alfalfa for dehydrator , thousands of acres . just a little FYI on your dealer sticker Tony
    1 point
  38. Sold some weights to a guy a few years back. Pulled up in a very nice looking F250. Sounded different. It had a 5.9 cummins kit in it. He said it was the 3rd one he did. Also said it made a truck out of it. Please you 6.0 fans don't jump on me what he said. I am a GM man myself.
    1 point
  39. Something I don't understand, a steam traction engine rated for 50hp can pull 12-15 plows but a tractor rated the same can only pull 3.
    0 points
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