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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/16/2021 in all areas

  1. Really it’s just some winter sand, just hard to get perspective with a smart car.
    7 points
  2. Small enough to use a trampoline
    5 points
  3. Think I would have peed my pants seeing that cruising around
    5 points
  4. Ouch, but I hope they got the coyote.
    4 points
  5. Stopped for fuel on I64 this morning. Had a chuckle. Yepper, smart car.
    4 points
  6. I'm pretty sure it doesn't sound near as good as the original general Lee. I'd hate to see their version of Daisy. Maybe it'd make a good Cleatus car.
    4 points
  7. I like the parking brake.....errr....rock. It would really take some talent for the boys to slide across the hood of that one...
    4 points
  8. twostepn2001, Great questions, my friend! The Model T Ford Touring car is likely a pre 1919, as it has no demountable rims and still has kerosene dash lamps, which indicate it doesn't have an electric starting system, both options introduced in 1919? The truck at right is an IHC Six Speed special, I'd bet? Roger WILL know. I'm going by the rear end "banjo housing." Their hubcaps were pretty "telling" as well. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Oliver "chilled plows" were courting a tractor manufacturer to sell out to. Their first sales stunt photo was this one of three Rumely Oilpull Type E, 30-60 kerosene tractors pulling a 50-bottom plow at Purdue University. Oliver employed a "bookcase" gang. If you remember the old glass face door "bookcases" like we had in our one room school at Glengarry, these plow gangs bolted together making whatever width plow the customer wanted. Not to be outdone by the Rumely Oilpull Company, International Harvester sent three 45 IHC Moguls to Purdue University to pull 55-bottoms! I don't know about Dr. Rumely and his decision about Oliver plows? Maybe Roger does? Regardless, International Harvester either found a better plow, or a better deal from P&O. Which meant, "Parlin & Orendorff. P&O built plows early on as this 1885 advertisement had on it. Son Mike has his great grandfather, Jefferson Davis Simpson's Parlin & Orendorff two disk plow he farmed with near Moore, Montana. My late FIL, Lynn Simpson, said he rode this plow for his dad many times, pulled by five workhorses. He referred to himself as "A Plow Jockey." (PS: my wife's Grandpa Simpson was a first cousin of Ulysses Simpson Grant, and they were BOTH second cousins of Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy.) This is one of two seats we have for the P&O plow. It is the original that was broken badly around the bolted center section. A machine shop friend welded it back together for me, when in Whitefish before I retired out of the school district. The other one hangs in the shed and is in perfect shape. Note the name stamped into the seat(s). This early (1904) 32 hp Reeves steam engine is pulling 16-bottoms of P&O plows on this advertisement postcard. Now Mike also has three IHC Plows out at Silver Creek. This Little Genius plow that has friend "MTMatt," or Matt Eisenbacher's shears on it is the small two bottom IHC plow. Mike also has this 4-bottom IHC plow. And Mike has this five disk IHC plow, here shown behind the McCormick-Deering TD-40 TracTracTor several years ago when the tractor was still red and the farmland had just been broken. And this photo makes an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. Just for the record twostepn2001, this is why I posted the pictures of the IHC plows. I used to be an IH partsman. That was when I woke up and learned the reason every IH parts number on their plow parts began with a "PO!" Gary😉
    4 points
  9. I'd say jeeper61 posted a photo to what that truck is in TwoStep's picture.
    3 points
  10. TN Hillbilly, I just texted him. He's busy making fishing lures for a show he goes to this time of year. He got locked out of Red Power, and needs to set up a new password. So he's just been lurking. I'm glad Matt's okay! Gary😁
    3 points
  11. Unfixable once it's doing this. Load her back up and drop it off here and I can dispose of it ...... 😂 Awesome tractor, bucket list if I hit the lotto
    3 points
  12. Cletus said he always wanted a “flat-head “ Ford......😂
    3 points
  13. It maybe something like this 1915 Model F
    3 points
  14. I had a Ford truck once. Couldn't trust park in it either.
    3 points
  15. Got the new to me 5488 home and having some issues with the master clutch. Gauge says 240 psi and 0 psi with clutch pressed in. I can not shift the tractor in to a range or reverse. It just moves forward a bit then grinds. I checked cable for movement and all looks to be moving right. I can't figure out why all my pictures are sideways. Sorry about that
    2 points
  16. I can remember when it was the Japanese who were buying up the United Stated for their "nefarious" schemes, but with the part that I quoted, I fully agree, a percentage that probably runs in the high 90 percent range. We see what has happened to Montana, Colorado, New Mexico and IS happening to Texas, Idaho, and at least the NW corner of Wyoming, when they show up, and IMMEDIATELY set about telling the people about the "error of their ways". Talk about ALIEN INVADERS. Unfortunately, the Chamber of Commerce in Amarillo (which owes its very existence to ranching, oil and gas, the military, and agriculture), whinged and moaned until it was taken down.
    2 points
  17. I bought the truck already high mileage, I think around 220k. I’m not sure what is wrong, but it sounds like I should probably have a mechanic look at it, and it’s good to know some options for rebuilt engines if mine is too bad. I believe you guys have talked me out of a used engine that I can’t hear run. Thanks.
    2 points
  18. Don't go "Beth Dutton" on us? She is worth looking at and has a mouth that can cut boiler plate.
    2 points
  19. Hold my beer and watch this?
    2 points
  20. I agree with Dasnake, what's wrong with the engine you have??? Computer commanded motors these days can or should be able to go 1/2 million miles these days if taken care of. That being said. Again, what's the noise? Timing chains? Rods? 2 to 4 grand can fix alot of things then comes the removal and install prices , just food for thought . Mark
    2 points
  21. I have my own general.....
    2 points
  22. Shes a real spinner.. she’d have to be😉
    2 points
  23. The truck in TwoStep's photo is probably not a International Six-Speed Special but it could very well be an earlier Shovel Nose IHC. The cab is not right, the frame is too narrow, the springing is different and the wheels with hard rubber tires indicate it's not a Six-Speed Special. The wood cab, the frame/spring layout and the axle look right for the double-reduction final drives used on the 1915-1922 Shovel Nose Internationals but to be honest, it's hard to tell without a higher resolution photo.
    2 points
  24. I know it’s only money, but I have had enough bad experiences with engines that I have not heard run. I’m not buying anymore. The best experiences with used engines that I have had are from reputable salvage yards that will at least give you the option of a one year warranty. No way I would even consider shelling out hardly anything unless it comes with a warranty I think I can trust.
    2 points
  25. Nifty! If you like such things check out Uline, I could browse that catalog for hours. last Christmas i made my wife some stools, I only got one done in time, so i gave it to her and told her it was her “stool sample” and the rest would be along as soon as she OKed that one. She liked the stools, didn’t appreciate the joke.. oh well.
    2 points
  26. One of the west Texas history groups l belong to posted this pic of Lockney, Texas in 1920. Pretty interesting to see a sign for Weber Wagons in front of the Morgan & Co. farm Machinery building. But even more interesting is IHC sign on the left side of the building. Also another IHC sign with P & O below. Could somebody remind me what P & O was? And l'm not joking or making fun of nobody, but l bet somebody here could tell what kind of truck that is just by looking at the back of it.
    2 points
  27. On a whim I just called Bates Corp and they had a 1026 hood and side tins. Will post pictures when I get them on.
    2 points
  28. Years ago I was machinist at a crane manufacturer. I got a work order for some kingpins made from 12” 1045 and couldn’t find it when I went out to the yard. Told the purchasing b*tch we don’t have any and she insisted we had 14’ listed in the computer. I told her it’s not anywhere to be found so if she wants these parts get some. After a big argument/theft accusations and explaining to her that this isn’t something someone took home in a lunch pail she ordered the required material. A few months later it turned up, in the neighbouring companies parking lot, sticking out of the top of a 10’ snow pile! The snow plow caught it and pushed it up there. Don’t know how he didn’t feel that... 14’ of 12” round steel weighs 5416lbs... I have to go rewire front to back a 1960 F-100 today so project X will have to wait till this evening. Someone butchered an S-10 steering column into this poor thing also and generally made a mess. Thankfully there’s not many circuits in these old trucks so shouldn’t be too bad a job...
    2 points
  29. Ashland Oil bought Scurlock Oil in the early 80's and then later bought Permian and merged them into Scurlock-Permian. ln the 90's (l'm not sure when) Plains bought Scurlock-Permian. Glad you asked about it. l had forgotten all about those olive drab green R Macks they had. 😊 The only time l ever saw a crude trailer imploded was a Permian truck. One of their drivers pulled into a injection point, hooked up and started unloading but neglected to open the vent line. About 10 minutes later l heard what sounded like a crash. looked up and saw that trailer crumpled up in the middle like a squished beer can.
    2 points
  30. Pic of our 986 Red power, original paint
    2 points
  31. TwoStep---- Sure would have been great to have met you in your crude oil hauling days while loading a tanker off of our family farm. I always heard how profitable growing "Texas style" 2x1 skip row cotton was--------(2 rows of oil wells x 1 row of cotton).!!!!!$$$$ Very little production here in the Delta------mineral values are minimal. DD
    2 points
  32. I'm not an old timer by any means, but I'm starting to get some years under my belt and realize some things. I've heard since the early 2000's "remember the 80's" "it cant keep going" "this is gonna collapse" ..........well it hasn't. People that spent big money back then dont look so dumb now. Property IS wealth and has one of the best returns going. I dont see interest rates going up, no politician wants to pull the handbrake and stop the wagon. Our currency is going to further devalue through inflation, and prices are gonna keep going up. Unfortunately those of us that were frugal and stood by are going to lose this game. Makes me a bit sick knowing many in my family are/were sitting on enormous amounts of cash only to have its purchasing power devalued to the point they lost money by saving. Property could have been bought, equipment upgraded, buildings built but not to be. They were taught to be conservative, but when everybody else doesnt use that philosophy you quickly find yourself surrounded as missed opportunities get gobbled up. I could be wrong, but I really have my doubts. IF it does happen it won't be pretty and I'll bet theres more chaos than just more farm bankruptcies and auctions, it will go much deeper and be more chaotic than that.
    2 points
  33. OBG that Olds motor must have made that 36 move they always made good power some friends from high school had Cutlasses' and 442s they were formidable. Cool photo with your wife in front of that 36 thx for sharing, I have only had 3 Fords two of them were tractors the other was a Falcon Sprint. Grampa on Dads side was a GM man too to he worked for Delco and later ran a business making tooling and parts for them. I spent many hours making parts for him in his machine shop when I was in high school
    2 points
  34. Ding Dang Double post.. LOL To help overcome the mistake of a double post here's another picture of my 1586 Red Power to make up for my mistake! LOL
    2 points
  35. 544 that I found at a dealership in the weeds and restored but use it each summer. Dad sold his at the farm auction in 1987 and would always talk about that tractor. So it was my goal to buy one for the farm again. He loved planting oats this spring with it. And the boys used it as their backdrop for the Pledge when they were remote that March. Even though mine is a gas, I really enjoy using it.
    2 points
  36. A little more progress after rearranging things so that the hoods could lineup.
    2 points
  37. What controls the glow plugs? Is it part of the ecm or does it have a separate controller? Is it possibly a software problem? Every time I hire a dealer to work on something, I remember why I don’t hire dealers to work on anything.
    1 point
  38. I turned it off halfway through episode 2................ If I want to hear language like that, I will take a tape recorder to the shop with me....😝 Mike
    1 point
  39. 1968 model, gas,gear drive . Bought it in 2016 from a farmer near Fort Dodge Iowa. One of my favorites
    1 point
  40. We may be backwards around here but we aren’t upside down 😉
    1 point
  41. twostepn2001, I can tell by the cigar he's smoking, he is just another farm guy, like I was when we married nearly 59 years ago. We lived in this little house on the farm and the Milwaukee diesel engines would go by wanting someone to wave at them as in this May 1964 photo. I'd sit outside on this lawn chair I've had since before I was born, holding my cup of percolator perked coffee, waving my arm off at them. I just wore a generic cap like his too. These weren't steam locomotives, but diesel electrics. The Nichols & Shepard and Russell traction engines were over where Mom and Dad lived, across Beaver Crick. They required the mandatory Polka Dot Cap Gary😁
    1 point
  42. Fire in the fields-------while pulling the thresher with a steamer. That looks like he is pulling a full load in the top picture. How often did the old timers encounter a fire started by the steam engine smoke stack??? Have always wondered-----even realizing they had a screen in the smoke stack. ***** Sorta like that road grader. DD
    1 point
  43. A neat photo of an oil fired Holt traction engine pulling a combined harvester in a wheat field. This Best steam traction engine WAS pulling a combined harvester. It's true; anytime you have fire in a ripe grain field, this can be the end result.😭😭 A late 1909 or a very early 1910 32 hp Case straw burner engine on the belt threshing. This farmer/engineer must be building pressure to go to work with his tandem compound Advance engine. Threshing in Iowa with a 16 hp Gaar Scott engine with its front wheels on planks so it will set level, to maintain the correct water level and keep water over the firebox's crown sheet. A 16 hp Reeves double simple engine is busy threshing. This is kind of a neat photo of the threshing crew posing with this 12 hp Case tandem compound engine after finishing a threshing set. The earlier Case threshing machine still is utilizing a slat stacker, still an option. The "Bowler" or "derby" hats were quite popular it appears. Not a Pokey Dot or Choo-Choo cap in the whole bunch. An unusual sight in the USA. These two British Fowler engines are winching cable plowing in California. The far engine pulls that plow out in the middle of the field its direction and this near engine pulls it back. They used flag signals when stopping and changing directions. This is a closeup of the British cable plow. It is steered one direction, then the plow crew goes to the other end to steer it back as that end is dropped into the ground. I know little about this three wheel tractor but I thought this was an interesting advertisement. A Champion Road Grader utilizes a McCormick-Deering power plant setting on a Trackson crawler conversion. A roller mill flour plant in Hebron, North Dakota. Plant workers hauled sacks of flower to the railyards to load flour into a boxcar. A horse team and wagon hauled one load and a brass radiator Model T Ford Car converted to a chain drive, hard rubber rear tire truck hauled the other load. A North Dakota man and wife drive their 1916 Model T on their farm in 1917. The same couple's 1916 Model T Touring Car has its weather curtains and tire chains installed. The engine and radiator are covered so the motor doesn't cool off, as apparently it is going to be driven again soon? The same farmer has his early (ca. 1917) Model TT Ford Truck ready to go work. Note the hard rubber tires in the rear. The farmer and his daughter with a grocery company's IHC "shovelnose" truck. The same farmer and daughter, with the truck converted to a farm truck. The farmer's wife posing with their Dodge Touring Car. Tough times for a Dust Bowl refugee farmer headed to California in his (unknown to me?) Sedan and family. Back to that North Dakota Farm. A team of horses harnessed to a "Two Horse Open Sleigh." (Oh what fun??) The farmer and his daughter as he plows his cropland. He's seeding with his team of horses here. This is a different farm taking a break while binding and shocking grain for harvest. That North Dakota farmer lifting hay up into his beautiful Barn's hayloft with a team of horses. A couple of Illinois farmers visiting and a son is on the IH Farmall M with the "heathouser comfort cover." A G Allis Chalmers tractor is all set up for painting Highway Lines. Seven of these IH mower tractors were built in Canada for tree farms to mow between the tree rows. This one has a narrow front end. I don't know which IH components were used to build this tractor? This IH Super C was also set up to mow grass between tree rows. And since this is IH Tractors on a Montana Farm, here are four from my birthday a year and a half ago. Johnny the 1935 IHC Farmall F-12, Tony the 1940 IH Farmall A, Toot the 1944 IH Farmall M, and Annie the 1939 IH Farmall H out at Silver Creek. I bumped into this little IH Toy Truck that Johnny Bourke gave Mike when I worked as a partsman and salesman for him at Bourke Motor & Implement in 1974 & 1975. I had to take pictures for here. Gary😁
    1 point
  44. The Regulars pictured cross plowing cotton would be 1924-25 models. The two I have left on hand serial numbers identify as later models. ..........even though knowing my dad; either or both could very well have scavenged parts from the two in the picture. Daddy wasn't concerned about originality------and scavenging parts from the dead horse was a common practice back in those days. Both of mine have the enclosed steering gears up front (similar to the F20s).-------most likely added in later years. Both have been converted to L-P. Freight is no doubt a killer for most collectors to consider in moving any of my items up Nawth where most of the collectors reside. A couple of years ago---a near original, steel wheel Regular sold at a farm auction for $350. Weighing approx 4,000 lbs-------it would have brought that much or more at the scrap yard. And--------at that particular time I would have readily have bought the tractor if I had known it was for sale. Shortly thereafter-----my son Reb died unexpectedly. Not that Reb was a big proponent of rusty scrap iron-------but he did understand where it came from. Sorta opens up a new can of worms as the old codger and old scrap iron move forward. DD
    1 point
  45. Another interesting twin engined Ford truck was the GRICO-Mercury. Powered by two Ford-Mercury 239 ci flathead V-8's making 95 hp each. The Ford cabover tractor’s original V8 engine, drivetrain, and rear axle were retained. A second V8 engine, transmission, and driveline were installed behind the cab, under a sheet metal housing, driving the second axle in the tandem. The two powertrains were configured so that either one could be operated individually to propel the truck, or they could be run in tandem controlled by a single throttle, clutch pedal, and shift lever. Another twin Mercury powered truck was the Ford Merry-Neville. lt used the same Mercury 239 ci flathead V-8's. Ford wasn't the only one to build twin engined trucks. The Eisenhaur Company used two Chevy 6 cylinder engines to power their truck. Another feature was it had not just two, but three steering axles. Two in the front and one in the rear. This is a Relay Motor Co. twin engined truck. Powered by two Lycoming straight 8 cylinder engines. l couldn't find much info on this one. But the more l dig the more info l find on multiple engine powered trucks in the 30's and 40's.
    1 point
  46. Doing a little internet surfing and found pics of these trucks. The Thorco-Ford cabover was used to pull a '62 foot trailer. They were used to haul B-24 bomber parts made by Ford at the Rouge plant to other B-24 assembly plants. lt used two flathead V-8's, each engine had it's own transmission and powered one axle. Used a crew of three to drive it. Driver, co-driver and the third carried a Thompson .45 machine gun for protection against hi-jackers and saboteurs. lnstead of jacking up the cab for engine maintenance, they mounted the engines on a slide out tray. Disconnect the drive shaft and pull the engines out. Thorco also built trucks with side by side flathead engines. Each engine and transmission powered a drive axle. Supposedly designed for more reliability. lf one engine quit, they could still continue to a repair shop.
    1 point
  47. This guy with the general looks like he may have a tad bit of indigestion maybe he had one of Klingler's Turkey dinners
    1 point
  48. Far as l know, they still operate quite a few different farms. Two that l know of for sure is the Price Daniel Unit at Snyder, Texas and the 80 John Wallace Unit in Colorado City, Texas. They also operate a huge supply warehouse in Snyder and a trucking operation using inmates as drivers. l don't know as a fact, but have heard that the trucks are governed to 60 mph and the drivers are "short timers" that wouldn't gain anything by trying to escape. They usually run in convoys of 4 trucks, 3 driven by prisoners and followed by a fourth driven by a civilian. Not sure where either one of these pics was taken. Captions just said "Texas Prison System farm equipment." Said they were taken in 1955.
    1 point
  49. twostepn2001, Thanks for sending me more photos. I'll bet Roger is downloading them as well? I'm not sure what those squares are on that Avery gas tractor's driver wheels? I don't know the size either. Roger will have to do that for us. I'm not a gas tractor specialist like he is. Those two crawlers are Holts. I'm unable to tell from the front end perspective what size? They are 99.99% likely 75's. They could be 120s if I could have a side view (you can go back and take that picture for me, please?) so I could count cylinders and exhausts I'd know. That Advance-Rumely Universal steam engine (Either a 20 or a 22 hp, depending on age of the engine.) I was able to add a little more contrast to that photo. You were right, alright. That 35 hp Buffalo Pitts steam engine plowing appears to have unusual grouters on it's drive wheels as well? That John Deere tractor is neat. I don't know any of their sizes. It would seem an equal to a McCormick-Deering Farmall F-20? Except I can hear a terrible miss from that JD. That hard rubber tire, chain drive truck must be assisting the US Army with something, unless that's a fair or circus tent behind it? I had an IH Pickup of that body type era. It wasn't a two tone though, but the IH TravelAll I was furnished when I was a parts man at Bourke Motor & Implement was a two tone with those chrome moldings surrounding the second color. You know how little I know about cotton, though. Just what's in my belly button, my tee shirts, what comes on top of the aspirin in the bottle, AND what blows around from cottonwood trees here in Montana each spring. Gary😁
    1 point
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