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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/26/2021 in all areas

  1. Rained out again today with another 1” forecast for tomorrow. Enjoy everyones harvest pics so thought I would share a few. A couple gratuitous puppy pics thrown in for good measure. Just getting started this past week and not real promising weather in near future.
    13 points
  2. We finished our corn and popcorn. Still have 40 acres of bns to go
    7 points
  3. We had a couple dividend checks from coop elevator last spring. My 7 year old had been talking dirt bikes for a while so I ordered this last April 18th. Took till now to get one I could take home. I would bet the others got sold for more. But if we take care of it I will sell it in a couple years and get a 110 for him. Got about 2200 into it with helmet and extra support wheels tax and assembly.
    7 points
  4. 6 points
  5. And now for something completely different. (if I may borrow a phrase from Monty Python) https://designyoutrust.com/2019/01/the-luxury-apartment-on-wheels-camping-in-style-in-a-1930s-jungle-yacht/
    4 points
  6. Great! I'll label this pic as a Titan 15-30. Thanks again to the "University" and "the Professor!" Now what do we have here? a steamer powering a corn shredder, blowing the fodder right into the haymow on my great uncle's farm one mile south of Grandpa and Daddy's farm in Beadle County, SD. This beautiful big barn was torn down not too many years ago.
    4 points
  7. HMR, these are photos of a 15-30 Titan also known as a "Flaming Four". The engine design was similar to the 10-20 Titan engine but was a four cylinder version. They also used a chain final drive and had a two speed transmission like the 10-20 Titan. The 15-30 used a water pump, radiator and fan for cooling instead of the 10-20's plain water tank. I've added a video of one owned by the late friend of mine (Glen Westphal) who pasted away this spring from Covid . . . he is the guy cranking and operating the tractor in the first part of the video.
    4 points
  8. Matches. If insufficient supplment with 50 gal of diesel fuel. Yellow wonderbucket oil can be used in an emergency. 😉🤫🤐
    4 points
  9. By then won't the weight of containers have caused California to tip over?
    4 points
  10. I tried SDman's rubber mallet trick and still could not get it to pump any fuel, so I put a reman pump on and it now runs. Thanks everyone for the help!
    3 points
  11. The leaves and I have an agreement. They fall and blow where they wish and I leave them alone!😊
    3 points
  12. Roger and Gary, many thanks for your identifications of these tractors. I agree, it's an IHC Titan. I'm looking through Wendel's book and it sure resembles his pictures of 8-16 Titans, but bigger. Here's another pic of the same threshing outfit, and you can just make out the old IHC logo on the front. My uncle and my dad are standing in the center. The rest of the bundle pitchers are neighbors and hired men. I had never heard of "the flaming four." You fellas are good!
    3 points
  13. HMR, I agree with Roger that this is a Flaming Four 15-30 IHC Titan. My dad had one also. And yes, the 150 hp Case of Kory Anderson's lives at Andover, South Dakota. Son Mike and I were there for the introduction of it to the world, September 7, 2018. I included a photo of me, Kory Anderson and likely the longest serving Case steam engineer in the USA, Chady Atteberry, of Blackwell, Oklahoma. Gary😉
    3 points
  14. They are featured in one if the Farmington Implement truck videos......whole deal about the safari and the trucks.....a corporate human interest piece...
    3 points
  15. I just got started last week. My ground is pretty well drained, so I doubt that the 1-2" of rain predicted for tonight will slow things down more than a day or 2. The dryer, however, is acting up. Pressure regulator needs to be replaced. I had 2 dryers full done before the regulator came in heat. Combine bin fills a gravity wagon, and 3 wagons fill the dryer.
    3 points
  16. She's home...no oxygen. Doing well...
    3 points
  17. HMR, Roger didn't feed you a load of hay. Your dad's is the 32 hp Case engine they originally came out with in 1907. I'm unable to tell which year of 32 hp engine it is, but I'm going to guess it a 1908 or 1909 model because it has a round top steam dome, the later 32's had. This was the "First" 12"X12" Case and it is a farce. When I was a boy, I heard old Case engine men state, "The first 110 Case engines had "flat strap spokes in their rear wheels." The best of them swore that. I never knew where that B.rown S.ugar came from? Then one night at our Kalispell-Whitefish-Columbia Falls old iron club meeting, I had an open pushrod Briggs & Stratton kick starter and a single cylinder, two cycle Maytag washing machine engine in the back of my pickup. I'd just traded for them at our show a few weeks before. I'd brought them to ask some questions of the gas engine guys there. A "friend" (hard bargain driver) came up to me inside and showed me the 1906 J.I. Case catalog he'd just traded for. This "friend" went home with my two little gas engines and I went home with this 1906 Case Catalog with my "Proof" for the flat strap spokes in the rear wheels of a 110 hp Case. I took it and sat down and started to look through it. Lo and behold, there was a photo of the new 12"X12" engine they had just brought out that would soon replace the fabled 150 hp Case that was a gearing disaster for Case. This was the catalog cut they'd put in, as they obviously didn't have a new engraving made yet of the new 32 hp Case. THIS IS A 150 HP CASE ROAD LOCOMOTIVE. A LATE ONE, of the four built. ! This is the 150 hp Road Locomotive from the 1907 Case catalog. They were still trying to sell their huge boilers to sawmills or industrial sites. The Road Locomotive (150) was a disaster for Case, as far as traction engines go. It's parked alongside a 9 hp Case tandem compound engine, their "littlest one." I called the 9 hp engine above, Case's "littlest one." Earlier, they did build a littler one. This is an 8 hp Case center crank, Trunk Compound engine threshing in Montana. They also made the simple engine (non compound) model of this same engine. It was a "6 hp." I've never seen a photo anywhere of a 6 hp Case traction engine, but they did build them and advertised them on the covers of their early center crank catalogs. Now... The 32 hp Case engine that would replace the 150 hp Road Locomotive in the Case engine lineup. This engine is Case #18,122, the first 32 hp Case "Sample" built. It had round rear spokes in the driver wheels and less of them used than the next ones had. It was not shown in any Case catalogs. I'm guessing this was the second 32 hp Case built. It is shown in the 1907 catalog. This is actually the first cut of a 32 hp Case in their catalogs. The first ones had the "three hole" type of crank disk like the 150 hp Road Locomotive had. I think this 32 hp Case is from the 1908 Catalog? It has a round top steam dome on the boiler. This is the 1909 Catalog's cut of the 32 hp Case engines. This is Case "suits" on this postcard, pulling John Deere plows in Kansas. The "mis-colored postcard shows an early 32 hp Case being tried out plowing. This is a postcard JI Case put out for their customers to admire. This is the cover of my John Deere plow catalog. It shows a 32 hp Case pulling their plows in Kansas. This is also the cover from my John Deere plow catalog. My late steam friend and mentor, Walter Fred Mehmke owned this 1907 32 hp Case between Great Falls and Belt, Montana. He bought it in 1920 from Briggs Implement in Great Falls. It had been rebuilt from stem to stern, even with a new Judson governor, like the later engines used. He broke the farmland on his immense grain farm east of Great Falls with this engine. This is the last 32 hp "short smokebox" Case extant. In the later years, his son Carl had restored this engine and Walter's later purchased 110 hp Case. Carl and Martha Mehmke posed for my camera and black & white film at one of Carl's "Annual Mehmke Plow Days." The 32 hp and 110 hp Case engines, restored, are their backdrop. This is the 1907 32 hp Case hitched to a 12-bottom John Deere plow at an annual plow day. This was me in the cab of the 32 hp Case. I had a bit of pride that out of the multitude of licensed steam engineers present, he chose me and son Mike to operate the engine his dad broke their farmland with. Carl was somewhat fussy about his engines and understandably so. The 110 hp designation was given this engine in 1910. This is my friend Don' Bradley's 1910 hp Case #24,151 at Forsyth, Montana. They still had a lap-seam (not butt-strap as the later 110's had) boiler barrel, but it was extended out. This makes the easiest way of telling a 32 hp from a 110 hp. I'm sure there were a few holdovers ca. 1909-10 that disputed that. They now had a Judson governor, but Don's 110 had its governor replaced with an earlier Waters Governor. (I'd tried to get Carl Mehmke and Don Bradley to trade governors. They sort of talked about it, but it never happened. That would have made a more correct looking engine of Carl's 32 and Don's 110.) Incidentally, Don's 110 hp Case is a consecutive number to the 110 hp Case at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, that was once owned by my late friend Justin J. Hingtgen of LaMotte, Iowa. This is the 110 hp Case at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. This photo shows the triple rivet lap seam barrel boiler. I apologize for not having the serial number of this engine handy. It is either one before, or one after Don's above. I'd mentioned the 150 hp Case Road Locomotive above and This was the original catalog cut for it in (I believe?) the 1904 Case catalog. John Loeffelmacher, the designer is standing at right behind the front wheel of this engine, #14,666. This engine originally had round spokes in the rear wheels. This is the first 150 hp Case Road Locomotive at the factory, #14,666, pulling smaller Case engines up a hill. Note it now has a front water tank and flat strap spokes in the wheels. A repeat post here, this shows #14,666 with changed flat strap spokes in the rear wheels. Two smart @$$es from Montana (me and son Mike) pose like the John Loeffelmacher cut of the first 150 hp Case Road Locomotive September 7, 2018. But my friend Kory Anderson built THIS #14,666 from $cratch in seven figures. Kory sent me this huge autographed, framed photograph of his 150 hp Case he pulls 44-bottoms of John Deere Plows with. And last, but not least, HMR, I played with your photo a little. Not much, but a little. I know you asked what time it was, and I told you how to build a clock. It's just my nature. Our youngest daughter says, "Dad is a little bit 'Rainman'!" Gary😁
    3 points
  18. October 26th, 1881, 140 years ago at 3:00 this afternoon the one western happening that pretty much anyone who has read anything about the west knows about, the gunfight near the OK corral. seems like yesteryear.
    2 points
  19. Not a lot of Photos of it Here is one of the trailer being loaded
    2 points
  20. One year the leaves around my place were absolutely out of control, seemed like they all came down at the same time. I looked at the monster piles and got the bright idea the run them through the baler……..it actually worked!! I got about 5 nice firm bales out of the JD 14T; pulled up a pile and threw the leaves into the baler with a manure fork. Wish I’d taken pictures.
    2 points
  21. No but she shoots a handgun like them! I can out shoot her with a rifle. Shotgun we are about the same. Handgun I am way behind. She teaches ladies beginning handgun class, self defense and concealed carry classes for the gals.
    2 points
  22. I’m in the same boat here, I don’t farm in a bad area but some relatively poor ground. (Hills and patches surrounded by trees) This year will be decent but marginal ground doesn’t do well in a high price environment.
    2 points
  23. The front end certainly looks the same
    2 points
  24. Love the look of your 1460. I wish mine looked that good! Who's the baby in the tractor? I like tractor girls. Thx-Ace
    2 points
  25. ya things winding down around here, just aa few more things to put away and were done then shop works got the IH 706 in there now had a seized brake and fried the brake disc, dealer wanted 347 dollars a piece for the heavy duty or 220 for the regulars could believe it so i called my aftermarket supplier he's getting me some for 28 dollars apiece and figured it took 55 yrs to wear the first set out I'm sure these will last another 60 yrs
    2 points
  26. I tell my FIL every time the subject comes up “go big or go home!” My next leaf moving purchase is going to be a 3 point, pto blower . https://votex.com/en/products/blowers/pto-blower-b40
    2 points
  27. Since my Transtar and dozer project is on hold for a while, thought l'd post some pics of another project l have going. First pic is a real module truck, used to pick up cotton modules out of the field and haul to the gin. This is the truck l started with, a NewRay 1/32nd scale Pete. What l like about the NewRay trucks is that the cabs and sleepers are diecast metal and assembled with screws. Anyway, removed the box van and took the cab off of the frame. Since l didn't paint the cab, l didn't have to strip it completely. Only thing l'll paint are the fenders. Like l said, they are pretty easy to disassemble. l wanted to do the truck with stripes like the old Marmon l drove when l first started hauling crude oil and decided to paint the fenders blue to go along with the stripes. This is the basic frame after l extended it. This is the cab with the decals on it. l drew and printed them on my computer. My wife still has good eyes and steady hands so l let her have the honor of putting the decals on...lol Sign says "Booger Creek Gin Arlen, Texas." Some of you guys might know where Arlen, Tx is......😎 The fenders are a little darker blue than what shows in the pic but l think the pink and purple candy boxes kind of threw the phone camera off a little. Well this is all l have for now but post more as l make progress on it.
    2 points
  28. Gets kind of grainy I can't even make a guess
    2 points
  29. Not quite on that scale but an Indian Maharajah had a specially commissioned Rolls Royce shooting car which had a wash room and a double bed for "after shoot consultations"
    2 points
  30. I wish you luck. I have my grandpa's 1941 JDA. It was his big tractor! When I was a wee shaver, he thought he would teach me how to plow.......................then I learned how to rebuild fence😅🤣
    2 points
  31. That is him on his 30-60 Aultman Taylor gas tractor again, HMR. My grandpa had one just like it, below. My Grandpa earlier had this 1910 Aultman 30-60 gas tractor #47. It is shown pulling grain sacks to market. Gary😁
    2 points
  32. Roger Byrne: man, you are like a computer! Type in the question and immediately out comes the correct answer! Thank you also for the additional info and the difference between the two models of the Avery. Here's the next one from Daddy's old pics: Is this the Case 110 steamer that he always talked about? That is he at the controls custom threshing up in North Dakota. Thanks, Roger, for the confirmation of my grandpa's Case 110 steamer. My dad said it came on the Great Northern Railroad into tiny Yale, SD, along with a threshing machine. OK, here's another one of Daddy's pics: His handwriting on the back says the pic was taken near Strasburg, ND. He was up there custom threshing.
    2 points
  33. HMR---- For that reason I sometimes refer to Roger as the "University" and Gary as the "Professor". We are lucky to have access to their wealth of knowledge. Keep your pictures coming. DD
    2 points
  34. That works great on the farm, in town not so much! I keep the leaves cleaned up in town because they don't go through a snowblower worth a hoot! Hopefully this is the last winter it's a consideration. Then it will be interesting to see how much I can get out of the Snapper snowblower I bought used almost 20 years ago.
    1 point
  35. I can picture you and Sid “taking care of” your leaves (and tires) with a case of dynamite. Let me know when that will be so that I can observe from a “safe distance”, a number of states away!!! On the other hand, I would respond with your fire department for the mop up. Please don’t lose any fingers or worse!
    1 point
  36. Gotta be a happy kid. My first was a trail 70 that I bought from grandpa
    1 point
  37. Tilt decks are great especially for a specific load they are set up for, fast and easy. But they have a longer hang over past the axles and can lead to unbalance and sway if loaded incorrectly. More tail swing to watch for in tight quarters. They are nice for not high centering a low slung load when coming up on the trailer. They usually hit the ground trailer bed wide so you can load without concern for "hitting the ramps." Underslung ramps are great for a trailer where you may want to have a load hang over the end a bit. They drag more going through ditches and such. They do allow the rear of the trailer to be closed off with a gate/panel for boxed in use. You have to handle them to use them and are usually a light duty ramp that is not attached and can roll off the trailer during loading. Flip up ramps can be made heavier and longer with knees for larger equipment to be loaded. They are the simplest and most robust of the choices. Tailgates and flip ramps may catch wind when pulled unloaded and lead to sway. If your not fighting license weight issues the aluminum is not worth it unless you just like shiny things. Metal decks are great for keeping dirt and oils from dripping on customers driveway etc. Trailers are like boats. They all float but a canoe is more useful at times than a pontoon boat. No one trailer is perfect for every use.
    1 point
  38. . All but one came out without a fight. Chased threads. New studs went in easy
    1 point
  39. Yup found a friend had one sold it to us for 20$
    1 point
  40. Well If anybody is interested I didn't have deep enough pockets to buy the 1456. It was sure nice to dream for a few days though!
    1 point
  41. Nice work, fun project you have going there.....I’ve never really thought about modifying some of those die cast models like that ......good job 👍 Heath,NZ
    1 point
  42. We had 1.5 inches Saturday night and this storm that passed us on Sunday
    1 point
  43. What were you doing when it quit?? Possible you blew oring on the hitch control valve. Hitch has priority over aux. valves. But first I would pull pump and check flange oring and pump orings and also pump seal behind the pump drive gear. Have seen that seal get blowed out. When you install the pump, remove the filter and baffle plate behind the filter and make sure you don't push the jumper tube out. Good idea to remove the jumper tube anyway and replace the seals for it. If you do then install pump,jumper tube then filter. Good luck
    1 point
  44. Old Binder Guy, thanks a million for your reply. Roger said you were the go-to man for steamers; he's right! I appreciate the depth of your reply as well as all the pics. Wasn't that Case 150 at Andover? Another of Daddy's pics: He's standing in front of the tractor. Beadle County, SD
    1 point
  45. I'm the nephew lol. Several of these tractors and the TD18 would have been at RPRU this year but they scheduled it right in the middle of wheat harvest. I will have to get a few more pics but here are most of the 88's. They have a lot of letter series and hundred/fifty series also
    1 point
  46. Oxygen is improved, lung function is better just not where it needs to be to come home. Looking up in general.
    1 point
  47. No worries there Mike. He will be raised right. He will be the next generation of young men who love this country and will fight for the God given freedoms afforded us.
    1 point
  48. this is my brothers tractor he had our neighbor do. took him a year and a half but the end result is fantastic.
    1 point
  49. I would bet it was homemade. We had one my dad made to fit the M.
    1 point
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