Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/17/2021 in all areas

  1. still got mine. Bought it when I was in high school. Making a little more power now. ?
    7 points
  2. I prefer the '68-70 body style myself, but dad bought this new. 1971. Was the grocery getter until 1976. Has 63157 actual miles. Got replaced by a '76 Cordoba with a 360 2 barrel. Dad left the Charger sit at what used to be Baker auto in St Mary's over a weekend while they tried out the Cordoba. When we came back on Monday a high school fella and his girlfriend were looking at the Charger when we pulled in the lot. Dad said before he gets out of the Cordoba I'm not going to trade that car in, that "kid" will have it wrapped around a telephone pole in a week. Lol! So it's been here since. Dealership was only going to give him $600.00 for it back then.
    5 points
  3. Yeah she’s pretty but I’d have to take a break while chasing her. Do they have any that are slower
    5 points
  4. It's dark and we are wearing sunglasses.
    5 points
  5. Are you sure you want to see the one that’s slow enough for you? Lol
    4 points
  6. twostepn2001, D-6s, D-7s, D-8s and D-9 Caterpillars were quite common in some areas, where there were huge farms in decades past. Especially around the Great Falls and Montana Highline area (the Highline is Montana terminology for the upper railroad across the full length of Montana, the old GNRY. However, I've never heard the old Northern Pacific line across lower Montana ever called the "Lowline!" Below the Highline and Great Falls is called "The Golden Triangle" for the amount and quality of winter wheat grown in that area. Those areas are now farmed pretty much on "rubber." But in decades past, it was pretty easy to hear the clank of steel tracks in that area. This is Max and Earl Tyler's D-6 Caterpillar they ordered in late 1945, fearing it would come in "olive drab." But they were elated it came with yellow paint. They farm at Eddies Corner, Montana, near Moore. They later traded for this D-7 (later model, I don't know the Cat terminology). Later yet, Earl and Max were talked into this D6C "Special Application" Caterpillar to pull their 42' chisel plow. I believe this Cat had better specs than the older D-7 they had been using, above this photo. This photo was on the cover of a Caterpillar publication that I was fortunate to get a copy of, years ago. And Caterpillars weren't the complete answer, especially when you get too close to soggy, boggy, wet ground. I am not sure which Cat they're pulling with? They had a Caterpillar Seventy Five, An RD-8 and a D-8 in their collection of cats. As I remember, there wasn't a lot of difference in their appearances. (I am no newcomer-greenhorn to getting stuck crawler tractors out of bottomless mud either! I'm sad to say.) Later yet, Tyler's farmed with a Caterpillar Challenger 65 on rubber tracks, before going to rubber tires on green paint. This is just a fun day for the late Max Tyler, farming with his RD-8 Caterpillar, pulling the 42' chisel plow they used. Max Tyler restored this Caterpillar Diesel Seventy Five. Other than radiator markings, it looked much like the RD-8 as I remember. And, that Tyler 42' chisel plow got pulled by other objects on their farm as well. This was Max Tyler's 70th birthday, July 12th, 1991 at the Tyler Ranch. Earl Tyler was at the throttle of their 32 hp Reeves cross compound engine and Old Binder Guy had the privilege of steering it, as we pulled it across a field, just to demonstrate to Max's friends how they used to pull implements on their farm. A Caterpillar with noble blade on Sheffels' wheat farm in Cascade County, Montana May 1939. This photo is of former Montana Governor, J. Hugo Aronson welcoming Richard Nixon to Montana years ago. The man to the right of Nixon was Montana Governor Tim Babcock. At the far right was my late brother Bill recording the conversation and waiting to interview Nixon. Bill was Montana's Intermountain Radio Network News Director at that time. Why that last photo with Nixon? This is the book cover of The Galloping Swede, Governor J. Hugo Aronson, on his D-8 Caterpillar on his farm/ranch in Montana. Hugo was quite a guy, a first generation out of Sweden and a hard working son of a gun, as his nickname implies. I met Governor Aronson this day in the spring of 1957, at the Moccasin, Montana Experiment station, when Hugo was governor of our state. In the book, The Galloping Swede, I remember a story about this hard working older gentleman, Hugo Aronson. A young man came to his farm/ranch seeking employment. Hugo asked the man, "Do you vant a yob, or do you vant to Verk?" (Do you want a job, or do you want to Work?) Apparently he said, "work?" Hugo then asked, "Do you know how to milk cows?" He answered, "yes." His first chore was to get up at (I think) 4:AM to milk the cows, before they went to "work!" The man who left Aronson's farm at a later time and applied for work at another farm. The owner asked him, "Do you know how to milk cows?" and he answered "Nope." Also at the experiment station that day was the first time I ever ran a steam engine in public. I was at the throttle and cousin Fred was steering Dad's 20-70 Nichols & Shepard steam engine in the parade, pulling Emerson plows for their 50th Anniversary that day. I'm sorry about so many "bunny trails" in my description of Caterpillars in Montana twostepn2001. You don't likely understand how my brain functions!? Our youngest daughter has long said, "Dad's a little bit 'Rainman' you know!" (I actually accept that as a compliment in some ways!) At a Mehmke Plow Day in about 1990, Carl Mehmke got out the D-8 Caterpillar he used to operate as a young man for his dad. Carl was having a great time farming with the plows that day. At that time, Carl and his son Walter C. Mehmke (and hired men) farmed with two D-8 and two D-9 Caterpillars. Carl drove lots of miles to buy those models that had a clutch and transmission. He didn't want Cats with torque converters. Gear drives were not real plentiful. The D-7 on the far end had a bulldozer and it wasn't used to farm with. I took this photo of Carl at a 1990s plow day. He's posing with an International TD-35, they also farmed with back in the D-8 days. They bought it almost new, when Carl was very young. The previous owner had caught it on fire. Mehmke's rebuilt it and farmed with it. I have a picture somewhere in this computer of Dick O'Dea's (O'Day?) D-9 Caterpillar in the field, but I didn't make it identifiable. I got it from this Red Power site too. I can't remember who posted it. It was a great photo showing the chisel plow and D-9 from the rear. They farmed just across the tracks from the Mehmke's farm. They were both huge farms. I also grew up on a farm that farmed on tracks. They were McCormick-Deering TD-40 crawlers. I took this photo of Dad's dozer unit stuck in mud. We had these three we farmed with. And I 've still got this TD-40 McCormick Deering TracTracTor that we use occasionally at Mike's place on Silver Creek. I'd been disking with it here. This one is (was) the best one of the four. And I even farmed for real with tracks. This 1953 TD-18A and I went a lot of rounds together in the 1960s. And, IT is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm too!
    4 points
  7. Ahh the GTX, the gentlemen's mussel car, '66 to'71 I believe, a hemi or a 440, I had a satellite with a 383, they were nice cars, buckets, consoles, hardtop, I also drove a 65 savoy, bench, post, 3 speed 383, ex-cop car, cop suspension, cop engine, cop brakes, cop tranny, ( anybody catch my jist with the cop stuff?) And yes art, the push for the RR was cheep and fast.
    4 points
  8. A few good coyote hounds (leave out the catch dog) to get her winded, border collie to bring her back around, and a good soft mouthed Golden retriever to finish the hunt??
    3 points
  9. Are they swinging a frying pan?
    3 points
  10. What I prefer and what I wind up with are usually two completely different things ☹️?
    3 points
  11. Patience my boy, patience. She’s got to sleep at some point.
    3 points
  12. This is what I was watching when the engine video came up in the sidebar.
    3 points
  13. Supposed to have a branding at 1:00 today At 8:30 got to thinking it may be a wet one By 9:00 they decided they could find a better day?
    3 points
  14. Another note while I'm thinking of trucks. Has anybody else noticed an increase in older trucks on the road lately? The trucking company that hauls some of our pallets let's us borrow some of their tools of we need them. I was over at their shop a couple of weeks ago returning a puller and I was talking with the mechanic. They had one of their older trucks that they drug out of the weeds inside for a complete rebuild. He said that for what they paid in repairs to keep their newest truck on the road due to emissions they could have rebuilt the truck they pulled out of the weeds.
    3 points
  15. Now 65 under FAR 121 (airlines), no retirement age under FAR part 91 or 135, under which business jets operate, fortunately for me. That said I've seen pilots who should have hung it up at 50 and others who are going strong at 75, and sadly, some who perhaps should never have been. Personally I'm not far from hanging it up. I try to evaluate my performance on every flight and every simulator session, where you really get put to the test. No doubt this was mishandled but unfortunately there's no B17 simulator to sharpen your skills on. Training of necessity has to be in the airplane which is risky at best. In the sim we are regularly exposed to situations you can't reasonably do in a plane without extreme risk if you can do them at all. Training accidents were common back in the days before simulators. In the sim we can have jammed controls, multiple engine failures, fires, decompressions, etc., with amazing realism but no real risk. Our department does double the requirement and we appreciate it even while somewhat dreading it. Sadly this accident is the typical chain which could have been broken at many levels. Properly accomplishing the inspections and setting the magneto point gap, repairing the "P"leads ( the grounding leads that enable the magneto to be shut off) instead of wiring them in place, cleaning and gapping spark plugs properly, not extending the gear until the field was made, etc.
    3 points
  16. We had an A&P grocery store with a big parking lot and a Riverside grocery across the street. Saturday nights both would be full with muscle cars. Of course back then it was all brute horse power, no bottles and buttons and crap. We had a friend we helped get his 440 back in his 69 Charger. The thing would pull the wheels at the strip. We got the motor in and bolted on the hood. He says lets run into town just to break it in. His house was on the edge of town, so it was close. We loaded up, went past the A&P on the 4 lanes, looped and wound up racing some guy in 383 RR. Needless to say, smoked him. So much for breaking it in. A guy I worked with ordered a 429 Boss. It come in the wrong color, didn't want it. Went out to this hole in the wall Chrysler garage that just happen to have a Cuda, purple, white interior, white rag top. He bought it, eventually wound up blowing it up street racing. Sat behind a garage for a number of years. It went thru Barrett-Jackson and was bought by Jackson for some millions of dollars a few years ago. A local dairy farmer bought the Boss. Hardly ever drove it, sat up in the barn till the mice got in it. Gone now. Another friend had a 69 Camaro, 302 cross ram. Went to lunch at the tasty freeze one day, something caught fire under the hood. He had hood pins and the heat swelled the hood on the pins and he couldn't get it up. Burnt to the ground. Him and his cousin went to another hole in the wall Chevy dealer. They had (2) 70 Camaros on the floor, an LT1 Z28 and a SS 396. They flipped a coin to see who got choice, they took them both. Another guy I worked with, still has his Grand Spalding 69 440 Dart. His brother still has his 340 Swinger. Out in CA it seems it's mostly tires, wheels, exhaust and a crate motor. Back here though, it's still mostly good old school hp. Yea, those were good times. Pity the kids today. Some get into some wild rides, but not the numbers there used to be.
    3 points
  17. There is a shortage of reliable trucks. The government has castrated what was once a very reliable machine, and turned it into junk.
    3 points
  18. Best 15 minutes I’ve spent today, had two of those motors, the 289 hipo, and the Pontiac 350, both great little movers, never had the 340 but I left a lot of 340 owners scratching their heads with my RR 383, comments usually started with, “never been bested by a roadrunner before” if I can say this without coming across as presumptuous I had a knack at the tree and being as those were the four speed years I took a lot of info in when ever reading about Sox, Grumpy, Landy et al, great, enjoyable years 1967 to 1972. thanx.
    3 points
  19. Flag rugby . . . here I thought only real people participated in rugby . . . sigh . . . what is this world coming to?
    3 points
  20. Got some good seat time on the 1256 plowing my neighbors 30 acre field.
    2 points
  21. If people were smart and modified stuff to appear stock and keep the programming so there was never more than a slight puffy haze of smoke they would have very little to worry about. Punch the catalyst and DPF out, leave the cans and other noise suppression intact. Unfortunately when you hear a newer truck with engine brakes barking through straight pipes or a cloud of smoke taking out at a light it's a huge red flag.
    2 points
  22. Well I have the bait, when they gona start chasing? ?
    2 points
  23. I think you're on the mark here. I really don't see why wide plug gaps would lead to detonation as much as an over boost would, especially since it's not known exactly when the detonation took place. One witness stated he heard a power increase just before impact and that's when an extreme over boost could have occurred - in the last desperate seconds in an attempt to save it. For those not familiar, at that point the props should have been in max RPM, sort of like low gear. Advancing the throttles on a supercharged engine to to a very high manifold pressure even in "low gear" can cause extreme detonation. I've seen cylinder heads actually pushed off the barrels due to extreme over boost.
    2 points
  24. I prefer women to chase me.
    2 points
  25. Like I said turn loose the dog a good heeler or border collie would get her going in the right direction. Don't use some hard mouthed dog , don't want her all chewed up and slobbered on
    2 points
  26. Here's my current car. 71 Chevelle. Never was made as a muscle car with a 350. I rebuilt a 1969 300 HP 350 and had it on a chassis dyno a few years back and it had 330 at the wheels which calculates to 410 or so at the flywheel. I need to pull the engine sometime and freshen it up and the transmission as well. It just is getting tired and doesn't run as well as it did in the past.
    2 points
  27. after the peanuts are harvested the residue is baled. its some really good hay
    2 points
  28. Great kids------CLEAN THAT CABLE SON!!!!
    2 points
  29. and here is my little combine
    2 points
  30. It's the DNC's grand scheme to change all red states to blue states.
    2 points
  31. Well damn rusty that wuz a BIG oops, don’t tell zeke about this he’ll kick my shins if I ever make it through sleepy eye, but the same goes though, he wuz a kutey pie, and she is , whewww.
    2 points
  32. On my series III it looks like that is apart of the cab itself. It looks the same way there, i do not think its a buy and replace part but could be wrong. I think it would be a cut out and replace the damaged portion. No idea on fab prices in your area, but should be a simple reasonable rebuild.
    2 points
  33. Some of the “normal” vehicles from the late 50s to early 70s had pretty impressive performance, my favourite being bigger motored, higher geared, bigger sedans, not crazy off the line but once it’s rolling... my 72 Newport with a 400 can pull your average Honda kid’s passing attempt on the highway, shifts out of second at 90, my Newport is rated at 190 hp, pretty much the same car in 69 or 70 had a 383 rated at 300 hp, that’s just your average entry level Chrysler available at the time I have driven tons of old cars and trucks, the most impressive in stock trim has been a 63 Grand Prix, it was a 389, rated at 335?, it really went, I guess it was because of my carb rebuild, hahaha
    2 points
  34. That's an old pic of zeke with his sweet mullet, zeke is 5 now. Bonnie is 1. Here is a pic of the 2. Still got 2 more not in the pic
    2 points
  35. 8 people plus the shooter, nothing said about why, 19 year old shi*head, and the media will run again about the bad gun atmosphere, nothing but fuel for antis who thinking nothing of jumping on these tragic events with no thoughts of victims but only the "ban this ban that " mantra.
    2 points
  36. That would be an interesting project for Mr. Engels to take on.
    2 points
  37. Takeuchi.......' "" Dear Lord...protect those who choose not to take the narrow path...and buy Caterpillar/Komatsu /Case...even John Deere.....give them a second chance Lord....those errant souls who see productivity...even profitability in that Communist Cursed Crap , for they shall soon realise the error of their ways in supporting an ideaology far from the hopes and aspirations that symbolised the ethics of America's founding fathers...."" ...my thoughts after being unfortunate enough to have'' operated '' the aforesaid brandname ..... Mike
    2 points
  38. And, IIRC, that is how Plymouth marketed the Road Runner, with the GTX being released and marketed as a more 'luxurious', and more expensive muscle car.
    2 points
  39. I just think, as with all guys here ya gotta love cars, being older and not in any hurry to forget those days threads like this always make me smile, so many different guys, so many different manners of speed, and least of all so many different memories, I can think of one day racing and come up with a dozen different memorable moments.
    2 points
  40. That guy is obviously a big block fan. Here in NW PA, the majority of the muscle cars were all small blocks. They were hard to beat on the street. Not many strips close by. Interesting, the built 340's run like ****, and the only thing that could beat them, was when the guys from Ohio come over with their T Buckets. When I was living in CA, practically every mopar that you saw, had either a 440 or a hemi. I think I saw maybe 3 small blocks the whole time. Back here, just the opposite. How could you not remember a 289 or a 327 in any design. We used to run a 65 chevelle, hillborn injected 327. Gotta love those rpm's.
    2 points
  41. The RR 383 ran well BUT the 375/390 440 just worked better. Interesting, to the best of my recollection there was only 1 BB Mopar CAR head, it was used in the 361 to 440 engines up until the smog engine came along in 72 and none of them had valve seats just bare casting. The 361 and 413 truck heads were unique to the truck heads with valve seats, different cooling flow and smaller diameter spark plugs. I still have a 440 installed in a 74 Dart. It has the heads off of a 65 413 car with large diameter SS valves, something Mopar never made or put on a BB. Another slow day in Texas.
    2 points
  42. Not necessarily a common sight: Look at those eyes!! Jumped this crippled "Great Horned Owl"-----(barn owl) in our yard while cleaning up some this morning. My neighbor thinks he may have been injured last night while trying to get into their chicken pen. Looks to have a bad wing and broken leg. Got him into a pet carrier----Larry is calling Fish & Wildlife to see if they want to rescue him. edit: I explained to my wife that is the advantage of having a somewhat unkept yard. It can easily be called a "wildlife sanctuary"!!!!!!!?? DD
    2 points
  43. Heavens no Bill, I`ll just discount a bill from their fleet of junk I keep running.
    2 points
  44. Sure wish that the rates would go up on grain. I am actually running for cheaper rates than 3 years ago. I don’t buy the truck or driver shortage. It’s all a media ploy.
    2 points
  45. mader....couple of pics ......spent a few days on the Stations stock yards and holding pens.... ...you can see the need for the big ''pin'' on the right hand side of the driver......the rocks are quite substantial around the river flats......This post driver is OK...but their are better ones around.....especially for hilly country..... ,,,that is a nice truck, you have..... Mike
    2 points
  46. 2 points
  47. I traded for this I-H trip harrow late last year, so I ran it and it worked OK, It's 5 feet wide 8 foot over all. You know with it being all steel there is no rubber tires to change, they work great for gardens. The springs needed to be replaced and that's what I worked on last winter. I just put them in the other day? ?
    2 points
  48. Single shank was made for the JD tractors like the 4960 etc and the 5 shank was made for the 8950 Magnums ......
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...