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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/14/2020 in all areas

  1. Looking at your Robstown cotton truck, here's our grain truck that we used to haul cotton on a special occasion. This truck and trailer load of flat cotton bales, a part of our production ginned at True Co-op Gin on FM 70, Nueces County, TX (south of Robstown) was the result of the compress being full; and rather than place them on the ground, the gin offered patrons to load their bales onto their personal carriers, which we did and stored under cover at our place until the compress reopened. There are 29 bales on the truck and at least 6 on the trailer. These photos are of part of our production from August 1978 crop. Growers Fred (left) and brother. (Sorry, to my knowledge there are no watermelons on this load). A flat bale (as it comes from the gin) measures: 55" tall x 28" x 45" at the bulge (between ties). US cotton gins began using Universal Density Bales (UD) in 2001 year. UD bales (as they currently come from the gin) do not need to be compressed to ship. They measure 54-55" tall x 20-21" and 33" max at the bulge.
    4 points
  2. Still no word trace of the "phantom" watermelon truck from Miss. Authorities now believe the watermelons might be concealed in other items such as cotton bales. Undercover watermelon police took this surveillance photo at Robstown, Texas and later did a search and seizure but failed to find the elusive watermelons.
    2 points
  3. A big Jag for that Binder . she could handle it. Nice pic from yesteryear
    1 point
  4. Looks like quite a load and very precisely stacked. Very cool pictures.
    1 point
  5. setting too long just like a td if you can look in hole and confirm function and no broken parts.... spray some lube on shaft into pilot then in shop on level , jacked and well blocked tie pedal down place in high gear,every time you pass rock tire both ways. about 6 weeks back another post had to pry the disc loose,which requires a split due to small space
    1 point
  6. I really appreciate the diligence of the Texas watermelon authorities on continuing the search with this case. At least they found us a good picture of an old Binder hauling approx 50 bales of cotton (25,000 lbs). I see what looks to be an old FISK tire sign on the corner of the building------haven't thought about Fisk tires in a while. DD
    1 point
  7. Anson never to old to learn.? Hops is a vine grown on a wires. I saw a TV show maybe a "Dirty Jobs" show or I would not know a thing. The top part of vine is cut and taken to "processing". But I forget how much is really used in the beer making. Sadly local barley is no good for beer generally. And never could get protein up in wheat to where it was more than feed grade ether.?
    1 point
  8. Matt----- Picture of Donahue implement trailer------and you can see more pictures by Googling. www.donahuetrailers.com. and------an older one similar to what was popular down here once. The wheels lock-----and you pull it forward so to set the deck flat on the ground. Load your implement---- and reverse procedure. I never thought it would take much to build one-------and maybe improve the mouse trap while doing so. Not trying to sell you anything-----just thought you might get some ideas. ****** question on barley: Isn't hops that they make beer with a form of barley??? And I know they make beer from rice-----but I don't know anything about the process. DD
    1 point
  9. You Montana does look kinda like the picture when you dig. Flat and comes up when you dig. To bad mines worthless...
    1 point
  10. CNH wanted 90$ a piece for them, wound need 8 for both boards, found similar ones on McMaster for 8ish apiece
    1 point
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