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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/24/2020 in all areas

  1. the 5488 powershift IH had at the merger is saved, this is whats left anyways. its the one that was talked about on here that was at a NE iowa tech collage. I plan to put it all back together, It had the axles cut off with a torch to fit the tractor in a van trailer the day after the merger. as you can see. Hyd plumbing and remotes are different than production magnums.
    4 points
  2. 3/23/20 work is very slow at shop , Due to C- vírus shut down , the insurance companies are basically working from home and all collision work has dried up however, work on the Red Kid is moving swiftly. Some of his hot rod guys are coming in for service that he was to backed up for three weeks ago. i was very happy seeing the progress. two parts holding progress but we’ll work around it few pic. tony
    2 points
  3. Made some progress today. I would guess there was 2.5hrs of hammering between the first picture and the last picture. Large presses and power hammers come in handy for a task like this but since I’m not making money with my habit I refuse to spend the money that would be required to buy one in the current markets. 1) eye started, flat side, upset faces 2) starting the pein 3) fullers set in for the face and pein 4) pein refined further and cooling off 5) some tools I used. The item in the hardy hole is a home made guillotine that I use for the fullers. The cross pein on the stump is a 6 pounder that I was using to try and make the best of each swing. Next will be dressing the surfaces some and refining the pein further. It needs to be stretched out and thinned down before being rounded for a finale. I will also dress the sides and hammer in “cheeks” around the eye. The “cheek” is the area where my thumb is resting in the last picture. I like a cheek towards the handle but probably will not add one on top.
    2 points
  4. Here is a #9 IH hay rake ad. I now have printed it off to go with the #9 I have.
    2 points
  5. You Know , Jerry, I have been thinking of that for awhile now. I even looked at them in Feb at the World Ag Expo . Think when I complete the baler project in shop one that will be my next project, Not only for ease of cleaning and repairs but for more room. However , I like it parked in Garage next to Carol's car , I can then keep an eye on it daily and cleaner atmosphere. I don't have small Grankids anymore Two have graduated College and are working the other two are in college & HS but six hrs away. Geesh I am an old Bas*ard !, Carol has three great grand kids but they are baby girls. No help there. Guess I got my work cut out for me ! Carol ,Says I got to give Her 30 more years , h*ll that puts me at 104 and Carol says, If I don't last she is going to have me stuffed and propped up on front porch as the watch dog ! Tony
    1 point
  6. Matt, How many of us vintage equipment aficionados have stumbled into something we've always wanted and sometimes even have gotten "a steal" on purchasing it? Knowing, full well, it's going to cost way more than we'd ever conceived it would or could end up costing. Like a drunken sailor (sorry to pick on ex-Navy guys) in a house of ill repute, the plunge is just taken. The ill effects are worried about later. I had our 1926 Model T Coupe dealt for in 1953 when I was 10 years old, for $10. We went to get it and Dad was going to drive it home. Earl Shammel, the guy who owned it was kicking the dirt and not wanting to have to reveal, Floyd Farr, his buddy across the road, owned the cylinder head and he wanted $5 for it. I had the $10 but Dad had to dig into his wallet and get out a $5 to seal the deal. We did go home with it that evening. The poor ol' girl needed so much TLC, but it was drivable!!! I didn't drive the wheels off of it, but I put those 30X3-1/2" tires through the mill. I sure learned how to take them apart, patch the tube and put another boot in the tire. Here it is up on blocks, the fenders and visor drooping. And at this time, a "restoration" was a can of Coast to Coast black enamel and a paintbrush. It gave it a new lease on life. It took it from a "Rag Tag Jalopy," to a black Jalopy! I It set in the shop for several years. Then Dad moved it to a back shed in a hay field, where he kept his hogs. The hogs got the hood off and flattened it out like a new piece of sheet steel. Mice were living in it and it stunk like them and the hogs. I had lots of other Model T's and parts of Model T's I'd gathered. When I had the auction sale, that stuff went, but not my first car and my first truck. This was the truck after I procured it at age 11. When we left the farm and moved to the Flathead Valley, I dragged both of them along. Before I retired, when I had a paycheck, I started a body off restoration of the Coupe. I did every bit of it myself. Of course I worked 9 winters in a body shop, spent three years as a painter and had done headliners and some upholstery work in the body shop. (Things were different back then. We straightened and filled imperfections, instead of putting on all new parts.) When I was done, the old coupe looks pretty good, driving by at 25 mph. It's not a show car. I intended it to be a driver. Here are my first car and first truck at Kalispell. And here at Silver Creek. After I'd gotten stuff moved from Kalispell to Silver Creek, Mike told me, "Paw, before you check out, I want the truck 'shiny black'!" I have this friend in Minnesota who likes expensive Model T's. I forget just how he threatened me or Mike, but sounded like a situation with lumps on the head and maybe black eyes, if I restored this truck. I've fixed it all along as it needed fixing. And I assured Roger Byrne, we weren't going to start sanding and painting on it. His words were, "It's only original ONCE!" Gary?
    1 point
  7. Well here’s an update on the WD. Went and had the carburetor glass beaded and rebuilt it. Got the starter back from local shop yesterday. Today I hope to start it
    1 point
  8. Tony - You're going to have to put a hoist in that new shed so you can clean the undercarriage on that thing. That would be a great job for the Grand kids! jerry
    1 point
  9. This is as far as I am going to take it at this time. Weird colour is from my yard light. I even put the batty lids on.
    1 point
  10. Wow that’s pretty neat craftsmanship there Sledgehammer! And a lot of work too. Seems like many of our enjoyable hobbies can be a lot of work to do. Last fall I posted about an auction sale I went to with some older friends. I bought my Super MTA and Charlie bought this Cub. Here’s the picture again when we brought them home. So over the winter, another friend in the group (Curt) reworked the Cub as a project to do. The Cub was in pretty rough shape but nothing a few months and way too much money in parts couldn’t fix! Lol. And here’s how it turned out. I donated the two way plow because it didn’t have all the parts to make it functional but it looks good on a parade tractor. Charlie was tickled pink! As a joke, Curt put the for sale sign on the tractor and texted Charlie the picture. ? Charlie said he’d have to sell for $6000 just to break even!! Curt parked his Cub on the lawn as well and I thought the flag blowing was pretty neat. These aren’t on a farm but they will be IH tractors in Montana parades this summer!!
    1 point
  11. Sledgehammer, You and I have an affinity to hammers, I'd agree. I understand shrinking hammers, rounding hammers etc. from my 9 winters in a body shop. Each one has a special use. This rounding hammer was dad's user. He had two of them. I don't know what happened to the other one? These two were late purchases of his. Some of my Estwing leather handle hammers, etc. I think I've bought about three, since this photograph a couple years ago. My two leather handle ball pein hammers. Rubber handle Estwing carpentry hammers. These were some more hammers I found photos of. The little ball pein at the right was the first new tool I ever "bought." I was in Bourke Motor at about 7 years old and fell in love with that little hammer on their merchandise table with tools. I asked Alvin Lewis (the partsman) if I could charge it to my dad? He did, and there started my tool quest for a lifetime! Miscellaneous hammers. This is the smallest blacksmith hammer I have. These are my cobbler's hammers. My favorite carpentry hammer is this civil war era one, behind the square nails. These are some of our "user" sledge hammers. I Have a bunch more "non user" sledge hammers. One I don't use was Dad's 16 pound sledge. He has chipped plenty off of it, but still had his eyesight when he died. This is a the only picture I could find of my non-user sledge hammers, etc. There are hammers out in the shed shop too. This is the anvil and sledge hammer out there in the cold side. And these three hammers. And last but not least is this advertisement for Accordion Mutes. And things have really gotten tough in this Corona Virus mess we're in. But the best accordion joke I've seen this week was this one. Gary?
    1 point
  12. Tj01, Hope things go well with the Allis. I have a soft spot for these too. I have had 6 in the last 6 years. Some better than others when they came home. Some getting a refurb. Regards, Chris
    1 point
  13. This is not exactly an ad but from an article in a 1960 Guns magazine I have. I was interested looking at the prices.
    1 point
  14. And here is what it looks like now:
    1 point
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