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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/15/2019 in all areas

  1. Tools Explained: DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it. WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'Oh sh--!' SKILL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short. PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters. BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs. HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes. VISE-GRIPS: Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand. OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing race. TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity. HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper. BAND SAW: A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge. TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to disconnect. PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads. STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER: A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms. PRY BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part. HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to make hoses too short. HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we are trying to hit. UTILITY KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use. SON-OF-A-B**ch TOOL: (A personal favorite!!) Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling 'Son of a B**ch!' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you will need. ******************************
    13 points
  2. My grill is to small on my CDG...
    6 points
  3. I decided to post some pictures i have taken of our fall field work so far. Started beans on the 6th and as i write this we a a bit over half done with soybeans. We also got our token 44 acres of wheat planted in this time frame. Hope you enjoy the pictures Feel free to add your pictures to the response.
    5 points
  4. Is that you get to see things in the daylight. I’m on a rotating shift that has me working nights once in a while. I finished my last night shift for a while and woke up to a pretty day outside. Spotted some deer working across the oats. About 20 minutes later I see a coyote trailing them. Had him in the cross hairs getting settled on the gun at 650yds and into the corn he went. Now, that is a long way off and far from a definite hit but I was going to try because you miss 100% of shots you don’t take. That would have almost doubled my personal best from the kitchen window of 340yds on the trot. (Most likely luck but I’ll take it)
    5 points
  5. Somebody asked about this earlier. No spontaneous combustion but still a 2-3second cook time and you could eat it.
    4 points
  6. Who's laughing??? Nothing like the friendly bark of a .22-250 at 5:30 in the morning to let the missus know it's time to roll out of bed and make ya some breakfast. ? For you newlyweds, it's the little things like this that will endear your new wife to you for life???
    3 points
  7. 3 points
  8. 2 points
  9. You laugh but I put heating and air in a guys house and his garage windows were installed at the exact height of him leaning on bottom w/rifle. Such a great idea I did it at our house!! ??
    2 points
  10. This is my truck’s little sister. Just gotta show y’all that I got more projects than time. ‘52 merc. This goes in when truck comes out.
    2 points
  11. That's the one thing Dad always stressed don't ever get off the tractor with the pto running. We had H's and m's.
    2 points
  12. Got into some nice corn today. And there was some poor spots mixed in on the wet spots in the field.
    2 points
  13. What other sporting event starts with a prayer nowadays? Just watched the beginning of the Talladega race and they also had a Boy Scout Troop doing the Pledge of Allegiance. With "Under God" included. Also, when did they start racing Mustangs and Camaros? I haven't tuned i for a while I guess!
    1 point
  14. And after passing you they immediately step on the brakes because they’re turning at the next turn or exit ??
    1 point
  15. Ha! Illegal my state and a little redneck but I admit I was standing on my porch one morning and shot a deer in my pajamas. How he got in my pajamas, I'll never know.? With apologies to Groucho.........
    1 point
  16. I have 10 large handle, non stamped IH weights, with the L slot to lock them to the bracket, and a very nice deep bracket, so you don’t need the spacer blocks. These are the weights, unfortunately 3 of them are green. ?? The bracket is similar to this one, notice the depth of it, no spacer blocks and this bracket with spacers is on one of my 1066’s, notice how shallow it is, and needs the spacer blocks Let me know if you are interested, Fastenal ships fairly cheap if you are near a Fastenal store!
    1 point
  17. Well I decided to take the PTO shaft and gear box into a guy who has a local shop to see if he would press the gear off for me. After talking to him I decided I would I would drop off the bearings and oil seal I have order when they come in and he will bull the gear replace everything and press the gear back on. While I wanted to say I talked it myself, for as little as he is charging me, I have plenty of other projects to work on.
    1 point
  18. What are you talking about. I do that to my phone all the time. ?
    1 point
  19. Non Athletic Sport Centered Around Rednecks Dennis
    1 point
  20. Oxy-acetelyne also good for removing hair from back of hand. Dennis
    1 point
  21. We ended up without power for just under 48 hrs. Hwy's ended up being closed but as soon as they were passable I took the wife and kids to mom and dad's to keep warm. Snow is already melting now. Just glad it wasn't -30 when it happened
    1 point
  22. Watch the kids and grain carts, etc.. Those little squirts will crawl up there to play and get sucked in. Young kids and machinery are a poor match. Keep them away and safe unless someone has a hold of them.
    1 point
  23. The old blacksmith said the wire wheel, long before eye protection, was the worst thing made for your good eye.
    1 point
  24. This had 3 of 4 come off, but I can see why now. I sure would like to keep this setup, but not sure if I want to go that deep into it. I told my boys it's their long gone pap getting his revenge because we fought these same ones at the other farm for years.
    1 point
  25. I typed in failures......all that came up was my picture?????? Rick
    1 point
  26. Work has been busy the last few weeks. That has kept me from having much time to tune on the forge. I fired it Thursday and with very little effort got up around 1950°. It ran for about 5 min and promptly froze up which had never happened previously. After a little research I haven’t been able to decide if my problem is a lack of LP volume in the size of my tank or LP flow through a gas grill sized regulator so I fixed both possibilities. Stay tuned for an update...
    1 point
  27. On your German diesel , have the throttle in idle , pull the shutoff out until the first detent , this is the excess fuel area of the pump . Crank it over until it starts and let it run in that position until it starts to slow down , then push the lever into the run position and then you can start to increase the throttle on the tractor . Try to keep it up to operating temp on these motors , don't let them sit and idle a lot or they slobber bad , plug muffler up , unburned fuel in the cylinders and you don't want any of the above . For your 407 , full throttle until it starts then bring it back down to just above idle for warm up . Danny
    1 point
  28. I guess I'll be like Diesel Doctor and go the other way with this. It is your choice, though. As somebody who has been in the diesel engine business for 30 years or better, I would venture to say the #1 issue that I have been paid WAY too much in both time and money over the years is...diesel fuel gelling problems. To me...this problem is completely preventable and completely unnecessary, so I have a lot of frustration with this. First off, I've heard every excuse known to man about this.."#1 fuel costs too much", "#1 fuel gets poorer mileage", "#1 fuel has no lubricity", "I use (whichever brand of additive you want to put in here) and we never have had a gelling problem", among many others. Doesn't mean a dang thing when your pulled off the side of the road on the coldest morning of the year because your luck finally ran out. I used to say #2 diesel was good to about 0 degrees F. Since the mandatory use of ULSD, I don't say that anymore. I've seen #2 diesel cloud up at 15-20 degrees Fahrenheit...and no, this stuff was not what I would call "summer fuel" or "soydiesel". There is so much variance in diesel fuel "recipes" from the refineries now that there is no "one size fits all" answer to this. Cummins Engine Company found this out 10 years ago when they received a lot of complaints about fuel system gelling after a hard winter after ULSD was mandated. They asked for fuel samples from pretty much every refinery in the northern US/Canada region so that they could analyze what the new ULSD formulations were composed of so they could make recommendations to their customers. They found out that every refinery had its own formulation...so much so that they could not really offer any clear recommendations that would apply to all formulations offered by the refineries. As far as the argument of #1 fuel having no lubricity....I ask you this question...How much lubricity is in #2 fuel when its gelled? Absolutely none. Have seen a lot of guys through the years have to replace many high dollar injectors on their Ford/IH Powerstrokes and GM Duramax diesel pickups from gelled up #2 fuel. Don't know that I have ever heard of anybody having to replace injectors due to too much #1 diesel fuel. As far as additives....when it gets below 0F as far as I am concerned, you do as much good pouring those additives on the ground as you do in your fuel tank. Every guy that has gelled diesel tells me the same story....they have Howes/Power Service/whatever brand you got for additive in the tank, at 2 or 3 times the regular rate called for...and its still gelled. Hmm...I guess you better tell the diesel fuel in the tank that it can't be gelled, then. You also have to realize that today's electronic common-rail fuel systems have much higher micron ratings for filters....meaning that their tolerance for "thick fuel" is much less than older diesel fuel systems...hence the chance for fuel filter plugging due to gelled fuel is much greater nowadays. The most convincing thing I have to offer about diesel fuel gelling happened over 20 years ago in our area. A lady that worked in town drove 25-30 miles one way every day from her husband's ranch. On one of the coldest days of winter(and in the middle of a blizzard), her fancy diesel pickup gelled up in an area you could truly call "no man's land"....there were no farms around, not much for cell service in that area in that time frame. A local group formed a rescue party to go find her. They found her on the long, lonely stretch of road, nearly frozen to death. Her husband had warned her not to get #1 diesel for some of the reasons listed above, and it nearly cost her her life. Its bad enough to put your life in danger due to a poor decision on your part...its even worse putting the life of a loved one in danger due to a poor decision on your part.
    1 point
  29. AC compressor quit and hasn't been replaced yet. Never heard of Ty-crop or Artex. usually Richardtons for small operators like us. the BTOs chop into trucks. I doubt that 17' wagons would fly here. I have dumped 12' wagons into 14' trucks. if you needed a truck over 18', might as well chop right into truck. No other trucks to help? buyer's choice. he only milks 60 cows and makes do with what he has. I'm happy with the yield and quality. population was good. when i clean up spillage where we have dumped, the ground is yellow from all the kernels still on the gravel. I'll have a lot to combine when buyer gets what he wants. his bunk is getting full.
    1 point
  30. Lot of 70/90/94 series Case tractors around here with snowblowers on them. The biggest problem with them is not the C4 clutch running 4x the normal speed in reverse(the reason for the warning decal); the biggest problem is tearing up C2 clutch due to riding the clutch pedal constantly on a snowblower. I've always said a Case powershift is one of the poorer tractors for a snowblower because.....they back up too fast in reverse. Would agree with Pete23, you wouldn't want to back up for a mile straight with a snowblower, but with some common sense, you'll be OK. Back in the late 1970s, a BTO around where I grew up had a couple 2590 Case tractors brand-new. One of them didn't have 100 hours on it when they had it running a haygrinder...and somebody left the powershift in reverse. After a couple hours of grinding, the tractor locked up. C4 clutch had pretty much turned into a glob of unrecognizable metal. As far as being a bad design....is it any worse than IH's mechanical TA that free-wheeled in low range? Hate to say it, but IH should have had a decal somewhere on those tractors to warn the operator about this condition. Many operators of those tractors learned about that "feature" the hard way.
    1 point
  31. I was a NASCAR fan before I was an F-1 fan. Went to 4-5 races at Michigan Int'l raceway in Brooklyn, Mi. Big Elliott fan, BILL, Chase wasn't born yet. Started as a Cale Yarborough fan when he drove the Hardy's car. Son and I went to ALL the F-1 races at Indy. I've watched 3-4 Indy car races this year. To put racing into perspective, back about 20 years ago when Micheal Schumacker was winning most of the races for Ferrari every year, Ferrari was spending as much money to field two cars & drivers at 16-18 races a year on every continent of the planet as ALL 43 NASCAR TEAMS spent ALL season running 20-something races all season. I remember the biggest concern about the first F-1 race at Indy was would there be enough room at the airports (plural) around Indy for all the teams and drivers and fans that fly to every race. Yeah, the MONEY spent in F-1 is crazy. The FIA, the governing body for F-1 implemented rules restricting engine/transmission changes years ago to "Reduce the cost of Racing". Now what used to be a $200,000 engine is now $750,000. The teams all carry several spares to every race, but to run a new engine or trans they loose positions at the start of the race, Sometimes 5-6 cars out of 20 will be pushed to the back of the field. And I'm sure the teams aren't saving any money. Haven't watched much (NONE) football since the Kaepernick thing. If he can't stand up I can't watch him.
    1 point
  32. Something like this. Top piece is swiveling in the bottom piece. Four different holes for four different groves for four different hoses. Orings in between the manifold. Top piece stays still with the "house" , bottom part stays still with the track frame
    1 point
  33. No matter what size, profitability is the key to success, period .
    1 point
  34. We have pushed a little bit with the 621 and it won't hardly push up the hill as steep as we make it. We would need duals on the front to make it safe. It also doesn't have air conditioning and would be miserable in haylage from the dust. I would love to have a STX instead of the 9170. Hopefully we will get a silage rack made similar to one of these
    1 point
  35. I like seeing pictures other people post so I will post a few more of this years corn silage.
    1 point
  36. if it has glow plugs then it has the 282 in it not the 310 german. the 310 is more desirable than the 282, i think they are both good engines. either engine is easy on fuel, overhauling either one will cost about as much or more than the tractor itself is worth, i overhauled the 282 in my 706 a couple years ago, it was expensive but it got the works-pump, injectors, sleeves, pistons, all new bearings and had the head gone through. the money i spent on it wouldnt make a years payment on a new tractor but it works good for my rinky-dink operation
    1 point
  37. With the www. Its It's nearly impossible to escape . At least 20 years ago most could go home. When I got home I played on the farm. Hunted the woods.
    1 point
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