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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/26/2019 in all areas

  1. 5 points
  2. We ran into one of those old wringer machines in an old place last year, my wife stared at it for a long time, walked around and looked at it again and shuddered. I asked what was up, she said “I was just looking at that and realized that’s where the phrase got your tit in the wringer came from!, can you even imagine?”
    5 points
  3. Both my grandmother and my mother cooked on coal fired kitchen ranges. The area just below the lids is the fire box, at the bottom of the fire box should be the grates. These rotate so that the ashes can be shaken out to fall in the ash pan below. The reason the chimney is in the back center of the stove is so the heat from the fire will flow over the oven to heat it before it exits the stove. The pipes inside the fire box are to heat water. They are usually connected to a large tank [100 gal or more] and it usually in another room, this way there is a place to store heated water and also heat the other room. To cook on a stove like this----just before cooking the grates would be shaken to get some of the ashes out----- a shovel of coal would be placed on the hot coals-----the drafts would be opened so there would be a very hot fire----much like OBG would do with his steam tractors. To regulate the cooking temperature ----the cooking pans would slid across the stove to the correct heat you would want to cook with. I don't remember how they regulated the oven temp----I sure it was a challenge to have baked goods come out perfect. As far as needing another stove for heat---my grandmother kitchen was 20 X 20 and it was usually about 80 deg there when she was cooking. As a side note when my grandmother was in her late 70's family members decided she should have an electric stove-----she never used it--put a towel over it and used it as counter space.
    4 points
  4. That's an excellent report Eric. I particularly like the part about the electric stove ("she never used it-put a towel over it and used it as counter space"). My grandmother in south Mississippi cooked on a wood fired stove------always big meals------always delicious-----always perfect. Here is to the oldtimers.? DD
    3 points
  5. Great photo. With spring planting looming on the horizon I thought I'd (re)post this JD press drill aerial view. I'd guess about 40 feet of press drill working there. From the cover of a 1972 brochure.
    3 points
  6. My great uncle bought his wife a washer and dryer about 10 years before they passed. After they passed we were cleaning out their house and the washer and dryer had never been used. She still washed in the washhouse out behind the house with a old Maytag wringer washer and hung the clothes on the line to dry.
    2 points
  7. Used ditcher for irrigation and drainage ditches------seems like would cut to a depth of approx 4.5 feet (with 2 passes). Pictures from Dondi ditcher website: Hopefully I will find some of my old printed pictures. The ditcher is manufactured in Itlay. I just built my tractor to pull it (sometime in late '70s or early '80s). DD
    2 points
  8. Here is the video of me driving it home.
    2 points
  9. I always liked this one
    1 point
  10. You beat me to it I was gonna do this one it's probably my favorite John prine tune
    1 point
  11. TroyDairy, That would be neat and educational for you to use that stove with your kids. I'm just old enough to remember (WWII was still going on) when Mom got a new Westinghouse electric range, and the old cook stove was removed from our kitchen, and it stored in the old threshing cook car. I remember being in the shop when dad was welding up holes in a small disk from an old double disk. He rigged it to cover the chimney in the kitchen. I'm glad Erik Bielke came along to straighten this old guy out. I spent a lot of time at my uncle's place, at the old Fergus Ranch. They had an electric and a coal range. They used the coal range in the winter and the electric stove more in the summer. But I'm no help for you with that stove, so now we both have our information. We still had a coal water heater in the basement and the coal stoker that fed the furnace that heated our house. When I came along, the four hole oak ice box was in the basement with jelly glasses (with jelly) and some other things stored in it, in the dirt floor fruit room. Mom had her new refrigerator by that time. But she had an IH refrigerator after that, and later a Frigidaire refrigerator door up, and freezer door down, that also came from Bourke Motor, where she got the IH refrigerator. But she never quit calling her refrigerators an "ice box." Gary? PS: Anson, if you'd bet a steam ditcher like the one that was digging ditches in Lewistown, many decades before I was born, you'd have a place for your "whustle!"
    1 point
  12. I’ve got one in the basement. Does that count?
    1 point
  13. Kitchen stoves were made to cook, bake, and some would heat water. They would also help warm up the room, but probably not heat it well in cold weather. They were also used in “summer kitchens”.
    1 point
  14. I hope for some clarity from you more experienced gentlemen. My grandparents are all long gone and not here to ask old time stuff. This stove is in the neighbor's cabin in the woods. It lies next to the farm land we rent from him as well. He lets our kids play here b/c his grandkids are gone away from area now. So....this is a Olympic stove made in Everett Wa. My question is how did they work? It looks like someone lit a fire in the oven portion..that cant be right...is it? But the chimney is directly behind the oven area. Looking at frt...the top left little door opens and looks like a fire box to me. Below is a drawer fulllll of ash so was the fire only in that little narrow area below the stove top "burners"? Then the bottom door is a drawer for pans n skillets..? This one has pipes running though the "fire box area". Was that a hot water tap per se.? Lines go out back. I kinda want to fire it up for kids for fun...and warmth. But these kept home warm too didnt they? The fire area seems so tiny. Or was it just for cooking? Thanks
    1 point
  15. Not a vintage ad but still vintage, farmer plowing near Lützelflüh Canton Bern Switzerland (Lützelflüh is also the town were the Swiss writer and Pastor Jeremias Gotthelf (actually Albert Bitzius 1797 - 1854) lived and wrote stories were farmers were the main characters.
    1 point
  16. The rest of the story: That lift pole might be needed to lift and mount my (planned but not done yet) BIG air whustles--------so to be able to send out the mating call to the passing Riverboats;--------or to lift some of those extra large watermelons (that I am not going to plant) from the field!!!! And-------maybe it will get around to lifting the old forge that has Hammer & Son Farms name on it. ******* Those offset bottom hitch plates you see Professor are from an old Towner offset disk that I hauled to the scrap yard sometime in the last couple of years. Didn't know exactly what they would be good for-------but just too valuable to haul off. ****** And-------here is a ?to Paul Harvey. DD
    1 point
  17. Your son's dog looks a lot happier than this poor guy?
    1 point
  18. Made it home last night. On my way north there was a red sunrise north of the brooks range headed home and worse and a picture from Facebook, I have taken a few shots of this stretch of road myself, but man, they never look this good
    1 point
  19. My co-pilot (2+2 Guy) and I left my house at 4:30 this morning. I had to borrow a trailer as mine is buried at the storage facility and I can't get it until May. So I asked my cousin's husband if I use his and he agreed. So the first stop was to pick up the trailer. We got on the road to Matt's about 5 and arrived just before nine. Getting ready to load... Loading up.. Che Checking things over... C All chained down and heading out! The drive back home was uneventful. I didn't want to try to back the trailer into our driveway so I opted to unload at at large open lot about a mile from my house. When we tried to start the tractor we found the batteries were low and couldn't turn it over. John's truck, with a jumper pack inside, was at my house so I called my mom to come get us. She was about a half hour away. Once we got back with John's truck we were finally able to get the tractor to start. Here we are finally back home. Turning into my driveway I found some tree branches.... After carefully maneuvering around the branches I parked it in the barn.
    1 point
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