Mountain Heritage

Trucks......Likes, dislikes, pros, cons

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I think that all of us could take a lesson from these posts. #1 Seems that out of near 2 million pickups built there are bound to be some problems.. #2 Some of us (me) will not give a manufacturer a second chance no matter what. #3 Dealer support is very important, is your local dealer does not support the truck you bought., you could just as well walk. #4 Most of us are VERY brand loyal, I assume this runs deep in the mind. We all want to think of ourselves as smart and make only correct choices. #5 DISCUSSING Good or bad vehicles is a lot like talking religion or politics. Bound to be some ruffled feathers.

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Brand loyalty goes a long way towards clouding one's judgement in buying a product.

As I have said, I would never consider owning anything but a Ford, not only because of my brand loyalty, but from what I saw from years of observation as to what was the vehicle of choice in the oilfield.

There are several reasons why I would never own a GM product, and the fact that the "G" stands for Government is but one of them, let us remember that in the 80's almost every GM pickup would 'park' the windshield wipers in the middle of the arc, and till this day, you can bet that a pickup, or Suburban type vehicle of ANY GM brand will only have one of the two DRL lit.

If they can't get the little things right, or do not care enough to figure out the problem, then what else don't they care about.

IF I were ever to consider another vehicle, it would be a F-150, or a Toyota.

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Has Chevy improved thier door hinges? wife grew up chevy to this day i have to remind her not to slam doors.

Door hinges are another fine chevy trait.

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I'm loyal since my first vehicle was 1960 Ford Falcon...$100.....First PU...1)1974 F100..5.0L, Used.... 2) 1981 F150 4.9L, new.... 3) 1980 F350 4.9L used (bus. work).... 4) 1990 F250 5.0L new.... 5) 1997 F150 4x4 4.6L..4K used.... 6) 1998 E350 5.4L new (still own for bus. work)... 7) 2004 F150 4x4 5.4L new.... 8) 2011 F150 4x4 5.0L 8k used.... 9) 2014 F150 4x4 3.5L used 13K .... 10) 2012 E250 (bus.work) 5.4L 111K used.

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Think of those 2,000,000 trucks sold at an average of $50,000 each or $100,000,000,000

On the original topic, I owned Fords through the 70's and 80,s, Tried out a couple of GM's in the 90's which nearly bankrupted me, then bought 2 used 98 Dodge pickups in the early 2000's which I still have. 1 2500 with the 5.9 gas and 1 3500 12v Cummins. The 2500 rides like a lumber wagon but pulls the wifes gooseneck horse trailer great. I did have to put a rear end in it after the locking diff came apart and shredded the gears, but no other major repairs. The diesel has needed a couple of links up front, brakes and a fuel lift pump and is my preferred travel vehicle. Overall, I've been very happy with them.

At work we have a fleet of around 200 trucks. All are either Ford or GM. The Ford diesels have cost the initial price of the truck in repairs in many cases over 10 years. The GM's seem to have a bunch of small problems, that while annoying, don't seem to add up to much downtime or expense. So, my personal experience and my work experience are polar opposite. I say buy what you like and what you can get support for the easiest.

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......it would be over 50 years ago that I first heard the old story.......

.....if you can't afford a Ford..

.....dodge a Dodge....

...you blokes are are so bloody spoiled for good pick up trucks over there in North America'....

...but you do not realise that...until you visit down under with all those friggin rice burners

.....some of which, a tool box and cut lunch and thermos...that's it ..no more room for anything else

Mike......(proud owner of a classic 1978 F 100 4x4 ...like rocking horse excrement in New Zealand )

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Also my toyota is a great off road work truck.

0121161158_zpsz7gpnpdy.jpg

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Has Chevy improved thier door hinges? wife grew up chevy to this day i have to remind her not to slam doors.

Door hinges are another fine chevy trait.

Yah, about 18 years ago...

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Has Chevy improved thier door hinges? wife grew up chevy to this day i have to remind her not to slam doors.

Door hinges are another fine chevy trait.

Yah, about 18 years ago...

Case in point how one small issue can make a person not like a particular brand.

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Has Chevy improved thier door hinges? wife grew up chevy to this day i have to remind her not to slam doors.

Door hinges are another fine chevy trait.

Yah, about 18 years ago...

Case in point how one small issue can make a person not like a particular brand.

Agreed,,, BUT because most of us only buy a new pickup every 8-10 years or so, it is very easy to stick with one brand and be happy. As for GM and me, I always had acceptable service out of my Chevys.. BUT the issue that I cannot overcome is how they (General Motors) treated my Wife and me over a faulty product. If I cannot get the manufacturer to stand behind the vehicles they make, the bridge gets burned quite quickly in my house.

I had a Toyota with 160,000 miles on it, Toyota had a recall for a head gasket issue. I told the shop that while they had the heads off, just replace the timing belts and water pump....................................... When I picked the truck up there was NO CHARGE FOR THE TIMING BELTS OR THE PUMP That my friends is standing behind the product.. If I ever need a small truck you know that Toyota will be the first place I look.

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I know there are lots of people that say o should go with Toyota or Ford. But just no dealer support off the bat so that isn't happening for me. Cause new or used with my luck. I will be going to see them!! Some days if it wasn't for bad luck I would not have any! Still shocked I got a 3688! Must have been intended for someone else ?

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Oops.

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Just sold my 2002 Chevy HD long bed, 8.1 engine with Allison tranny, 3:73 gears. It would tow with the diesels but use more fuel but with the price difference between gas and diesel it was a wash in cost per mile. Hated to get rid of the truck but it was time for a update.

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Just sold my 2002 Chevy HD long bed, 8.1 engine with Allison tranny, 3:73 gears. It would tow with the diesels but use more fuel but with the price difference between gas and diesel it was a wash in cost per mile. Hated to get rid of the truck but it was time for a update.

Did you update to another 8100?

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No got a deal on a 2012 GMC 3500 Duramax. first diesel truck I ever own

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Curious, I have not had a gasoline pickup truck since 1993. Compare the two trucks for us,, Empty performance, towing performance etc. What is your take on the diesel-Gasoline debate now?

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Curious, I have not had a gasoline pickup truck since 1993. Compare the two trucks for us,, Empty performance, towing performance etc. What is your take on the diesel-Gasoline debate now?

Depends on the usage. We have a '95 dodge with the Cummins 1/2 million on it, we bought it with 439k. We don't drive enough miles per year to justify much difference in price between the gas and diesel. With the gas it never gelled, doesn't have an injection pump and injectors to replace, and starts much easier in cold weather, is way more economical for short trips. Our old '81 Chevy dually with 454 4x4 and 456 gears. It got ten miles per gallon when empty and ten when it had three tons in the bed. Our dodge gets 16-17 but cost more to buy and gets slightly less when loaded.

For me I would like to have the 8.1 big block any day

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Gonzo

We just got that Duramax truck last year and I still have my 6.0 gas 2500HD. We still use both for getting cattle. The gas does fine but takes a bit longer. 22 gallon tank means you have to stop alot at 7 mpg loaded. Also big grades like Vantage is where the diesel shines. 70 is not even a thought for her. Where the gas is happy to stay about 45-50. Around town i think the gas is nicer b/c of the snappiness. But alot of that is the tune on the PCM. New one is a '11 vs my '05. '11 is just a wider bigger truck body so feels a bit porky around town for me. Brother thinks it's fine b/c it's his primary rig so he's used to it. The ext brake is a HUGE nicity. Man that thing with the Allison are so intuitive. It knows you wanna slow down. It is def less "thinking required" with the diesel on the highway loaded. Just does it. You dont need to get little runs up to the hills and think as much about the next down grade 3 miles ahead of time. Economy is around 11 loaded iirc. THat's nice esp with prices now. So, towing really nice, diesel wins. Putting around town I think the gas is better.

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Curious, I have not had a gasoline pickup truck since 1993. Compare the two trucks for us,, Empty performance, towing performance etc. What is your take on the diesel-Gasoline debate now?

I was dead set on buying a diesel for my first truck but dad talked me out me of it. Best thing too. We got a 94 6.5 diesel, and just bought a 97 6.5 diesel, plus my 02 6.0 gas and dads 00 6.0 gas. The gas trucks are way harder on fuel than the 6.5's, but then we're getting over 25 mpg with them. We run the gas trucks all winter and leave the diesels parked. Its much easier on the gas trucks for the short trips. We run the diesels from spring to the end of fall. And all the hay gets hauled with the 6.5. Much better towing with the diesel, but the 6.0 gas sure handles the stock trailer good, just uses more fuel. If your pulling alot, a diesel is great. If your pulling maybe a couple times a month and do alot of driving or short trips, the gas is really good. Diesel trucks get alot more expensive to work on too.

So I guess my take is to still have one of each, but if I was buying a brand new truck that would be my only farm truck, I would probably go with a gas, because of our cold winters and alot of short trips.

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With the tier 4 diesels, gas looks A LOT better. Tier 4 is not good for around town, stop and go, and will shut down in the middle of the road if the exhaust gets plugged. Plus, just look at the numbers, the diesel option is what, 6-8000$ more just to get 5-6 mpg more? And, diesel still costs more than gas. So, over 200,000 miles you can't save enough money in fuel to pay back the engine. Plus, as mentioned, cost of repair. No turbos on gas, diesel trans $4500, gas trans $2500, and if the engine does need replacement, you could buy a nice used gas truck for the cost of the diesel engine. But......... I love my early 98 12 V cummins Ram :D

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I have always been a pretty big advocate of Chevy because that's what I like to drive, and that's what I like to work on. I've currently got a 93 k1500 that I put an 05 6.0 in. It pepped up quite a bit over the old 350 but still maintained the decent mileage. (15-17) The half ton chassis still didn't cut it for towing though so I bought a 98 k3500 and put a 12v cummins out of a sprayer in it. Now, I think I've got the best of both worlds, old school reliability and power of a 12v, and the fit, finish, and ride quality of the GM pickup. Btw, the pickup has 232k on it, 30k of that with the 1200# cummins hanging in the frame rails. I haven't had a lick of trouble with the "chincy IFS"

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With the tier 4 diesels, gas looks A LOT better. Tier 4 is not good for around town, stop and go, and will shut down in the middle of the road if the exhaust gets plugged. Plus, just look at the numbers, the diesel option is what, 6-8000$ more just to get 5-6 mpg more? And, diesel still costs more than gas. So, over 200,000 miles you can't save enough money in fuel to pay back the engine. Plus, as mentioned, cost of repair. No turbos on gas, diesel trans $4500, gas trans $2500, and if the engine does need replacement, you could buy a nice used gas truck for the cost of the diesel engine. But......... I love my early 98 12 V cummins Ram :D

BUT if you figure residual increase in value the diesel option will MORE than make up the extra you pay. My 04 diesel PU cost $33.000 new, 11 years later I sold it with 150,000 towing miles on it for $26,000. If it had been a gas truck I would have been very lucky to get $12,000 out of it.

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Rarely does anyone take that into consideration. Fuel mileage is actually a small part of the viability equation.

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With the tier 4 diesels, gas looks A LOT better. Tier 4 is not good for around town, stop and go, and will shut down in the middle of the road if the exhaust gets plugged. Plus, just look at the numbers, the diesel option is what, 6-8000$ more just to get 5-6 mpg more? And, diesel still costs more than gas. So, over 200,000 miles you can't save enough money in fuel to pay back the engine. Plus, as mentioned, cost of repair. No turbos on gas, diesel trans $4500, gas trans $2500, and if the engine does need replacement, you could buy a nice used gas truck for the cost of the diesel engine. But......... I love my early 98 12 V cummins Ram :D

BUT if you figure residual increase in value the diesel option will MORE than make up the extra you pay. My 04 diesel PU cost $33.000 new, 11 years later I sold it with 150,000 towing miles on it for $26,000. If it had been a gas truck I would have been very lucky to get $12,000 out of it.

I wonder what the tier 4 trucks will bring in the resale market in 10 years?

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With the tier 4 diesels, gas looks A LOT better. Tier 4 is not good for around town, stop and go, and will shut down in the middle of the road if the exhaust gets plugged. Plus, just look at the numbers, the diesel option is what, 6-8000$ more just to get 5-6 mpg more? And, diesel still costs more than gas. So, over 200,000 miles you can't save enough money in fuel to pay back the engine. Plus, as mentioned, cost of repair. No turbos on gas, diesel trans $4500, gas trans $2500, and if the engine does need replacement, you could buy a nice used gas truck for the cost of the diesel engine. But......... I love my early 98 12 V cummins Ram :D

BUT if you figure residual increase in value the diesel option will MORE than make up the extra you pay. My 04 diesel PU cost $33.000 new, 11 years later I sold it with 150,000 towing miles on it for $26,000. If it had been a gas truck I would have been very lucky to get $12,000 out of it.

I wonder what the tier 4 trucks will bring in the resale market in 10 years?

People may fight over them considering what the new ones are like.

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