Tanker916

1952 I/H T6 Crawler Project

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That is my plan, hence why im hoping this rust stuff works. Only question I have is while I can getat all of the cooling compenents how the devil am I supposed to get at the inside of the engine block? I am trying to avoid taking it apart seeing how it runs very well.

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Tanker, on the left side of the block, behind the carburetor is a sheet metal cover, called a baffle, runs full length of the block. Remove it and you will have access to the cooling area around the sleeves. This baffle may be disintegrated also. Available as a Farmall M part from CaseIH or aftermarket sources

Case's price will scare you. I just did this project on my T6. I twisted off 4 studs and had to drill them out. Carb does not have to come off.

Holes with studs are a through hole to the water jacket.

Good luck

Dennis

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Here is a picture of a Farmall H with the header plate remove to get scale out. More or less the same as your T6, just smaller. I took the carb out for access to the scale inside. I replaced the water header for $40 from aftermarket parts supplier. I had a rad shop clean the rad also. It took 30 seconds to flow across the rad, after cleaning was 16 seconds. I asked what a new core would take, told around 12 seconds. So they told me if still over heats, they will take $ for cleaning off new core price. The cleaned out rad is working just fine now.

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This what I got out of the block, it was nasty. The head was full of scale, passage ways between the head & block were plugged full of scale. I spoke to Danny on here about it. He said seen a lot tractors with scale in the block as hard water was used instead of coolant. This H was overheating, once the scale was gone problem solved.

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I used this to break up the scale, then used magnetic to pick loose scale. It took awhile, didn't really want to take block out of the tractor. It smelled really bad, had shop door open, fans going. Poured in with water. Let it do its thing for couple hours, drain the block. Did that over 2 days. Must have had 4" of scale sitting in the block or more. The engine would over heat 15 mins or so. Now it barley moves the temp gauge. I was used heat gun to watch the temp's.

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By the way, cool project. Would love to have a T6, but no idea what I would do with it.

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On the hacked wiring those were simple machines, should be able to rewire it stock in a couple of hours. I recommend soldered connections and shrink tubing. Or you can leave it 12 volt and just rewire it eliminating the voltage regulator and any unneeded wires. I rewired/converted my Farmall M to 12 volt 3 wire alternator with work lights. Took about 2 hours for everything. No before I get raked over the coals for the conversion it's a working tractor not a trailer queen on a farm. Compatibility and reliability were key in the decision to switch over.

Kinda surprised they are letting you do that in quarters. They would have had kittens had someone tried that when I was still active. I recall a young SGT who got kicked out of quarters for rebuilding a transmission in his car port at Ft Bliss. He did make a mess and his concrete drive was ATF red.

Rick

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Farm thank you very much for that bit of advice. From what I can see there is a decent amount of mud inside the block so it will need to be washed out prior to any kind of rust removal treatment. Red thank you very much for the pictures that helps me seeing what right should look like. Tanker (wow im used to responding to that :P) I plan on keeping it 12 V for the exact reasons you mentioned. I plan on putting some off road lights on the front and use modern gagues on it. The issue with that is modern gagues require electric signals so I need to do some research on exactly how the gauge and sensor work.

On the rust not the "Metal Saver" I used blew me and my wife away.

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Found out the hard way Internatinal painters used Iron Oxide in their pigments, o well I plan on having it repainted anyway. I did no scrubing at all on these parts and there is no rust on them anywhere. I am truly blown away by its performance.

I have removed the water pump to get better access to the inside of the engine and see the condition of the inside. It didnt disapoint, rust everywhere to the point im amazed it could move water. So my current plan is to get more of the deruster on Friday (payday) and continue derusting the cooling parts I have already removed. While those soak im going to take the baffle off and clean the mud and large debrees from the block. When done im going to reseal it and fill the whole thing with the deruster, let it sit for 24 hours and drain. I figure even if it doesnt get all of the rust it should get enough to allow for cool operation.

O, and to answer your question about the housing Tanker, I have taken certain steps to prevent that exact scenario from happing. I parked it on top of wooden pallets I got from the motor pool. It has yet to actualy touch any concrete since I picked it up in CA. (Im sure my neighbors where laughing at me as I picked the pallets up as the tractor cleared them and put them back in front to drive over again.

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Well seing as you are a youngster I guess you will just have to bow...... :o! At least to this former tank PSG and Armor Officer Basics Tactics instructor :D!

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You can still use analog mechanical modern gauges. If you insist on using new electrical gauges it's pretty simple. Some only require the correct sender with power to one side of the gauge and the matching sender which provides readings based on just how much the sender grounds. Kinda acts like and in reality is a rheostat. Others have power plus secondary power and a ground. In any case the correct sender has to be used. On my M I have both gauges, oil and temp stock original mechanical still being used. No electrical connections except the amp meter. Amp meter is hooked up pretty much original with one side being attached to the battery and the other to the alternator, 3 wire to the large wire from the alternator. The instructions with the gauge will tell you how to wire it. On my 2 Ford 8N's that did not come from the factory with a temp gauge I have electrical gauges. A hot wire from the ignition switch providing power, a ground and a hot from the correct terminal on the gauge to the sender. The amp meters are hooked up stock and the oil pressure gauges are stock mechanical. Now keeping in mind that you are a cannon cocker and things have to be kept simple for you guys.... :lol:I can't make it any simpler.

Rick

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I am starting a 1954 T6 crawler project as well, Is there no one that manufactures a new front grille emblem ?

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Whelp I got the baffle off, a process that required the removal of the manifold. While the baffle itself was rusted to the point of having holes on the internal shutes (im not including the factory holes used to direct the water flow into the block) the inside of the block doesnt seem to be to bad. I sprayed water into the block and got most of the sediment out of it. Nest step is to put the baffle back on (I will replace it I just want to clean out the inside of the block while getting a new one).

Now for the mainfold. When I took the manifold off, the part the stud goes through fell off. Basically meaning that of the 6 studs only 5 can actualy hold the manifold on. When I looked inside the head I noticed there was oil on each exhaust valve. In addition the 3rd piston exhaust chamber was coated in oil to the point of seaping between the manifold and the block. I assume a little sepage is expected but not to the point of getting to the manifold?

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Tanker916

I have just started working on a 1954 T6 , and would love to see pictures of your progress so far, I am in search of light brackets and such BTW

Mike

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Guys I guess I will jump in too. First your T-6 looks very good and following your posts, you have done a good job going over some of the details in the two radiators! I will be watching and learning. I have a TD-6 Dozer/ loader, that was my uncles, Very worn and well used, compared to the pictures of yours. I do have a parts manual, it is TC-23D International parts catalog. I also have a repair and service manual. If there is something I can look up for you let me know. I was surprised to hear that the gas engines may be better than the diesels. Would not have expected that. But thats why i am here, to learn!

Your wiring doesnt look any worse than the two 1950 AC WD tractors I restored in the last year. Both were re-wired from scratch with alternators, switches and gages. Makes a very nice clean dependable system.

Keep up the good work and thanks for serving!

Regards,

Chris

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Okay so I appolgize for the delay in putting updates on here. So I took all of the radioator parts to the paint shop and had them sand blasted and powder coated. I have to admit I am blown away at how nice they look.

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Now before I start getting shot for having the inside powdercoated let me explain my logic. The parts where rusted faily badly and I wanted to prevent any further damage after spending all the money to get the rust out. Yes I understand antifreeze will help prevent rust but I wanted to go a step further. So all my parts with the exception of the radiator core where powder coated on the inside and out side. Now onto finding gaskets so I can put the darn thing together.....does anyone know where the devil I can get some? I have found gaskets glaor for the engine but nothing for the radiator tanks.

Another question I have is my grill is pretty banged up and don't think it can be salvaged, is there a place I can get a new one?

Same for the fuel pump the one I have leaks like a sive and cant find a repair kit or straight replacement pump.

And the finale question I have is how the devil does the fuel pump get power? I assume mechanical but I don't see anything in the repair or owners manule detailing how it works. The reason I ask is depending on how it gets power I may bypass it with a modern electrical pump.

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Tanker: You can make your own gaskets. Buy sheet material and use the round end of a ball peen hammer to tap along the edges to make an outline. Depending on how sharp the edges of the gasketed surface are, you may get an impression or a cut from the hammer. Anyway, finish the cut as necessary with a knife or scissors. I have heard of heavy tap paper being used as a gasket for radiators.

Another option depending on how tight the parts fit is Locktite 515 or the Permatex equivalent anaerobic gasket maker..They will bridge 0.50" with the use of the appropriate primer spray. I know John Deere specs them for use on the final drives on their tractors and I have used it for that purpose.

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Making gaskets is always an option and quite easy once you get the hang of it , If you opt to assemble with sealer in place

of gaskets "The Right Stuff" Gasket maker is one of the best gasket replacement products available ,Make no mistake it is

not RTV silicone which should not be allowed near engines , Myself and others I am sure have had their doubts about gasket

replacement products , But most if not all major automakers are using these products ever increasingly in varied applications..

Super Nice crawler by the way !!! Thanks for sharing all your work

Tech tip --- Cutting bolt holes in gaskets can be accomplished with the proper sized bullet shell casing tapped with a mallet .

just make sure there is no primerpost-77390-0-09678900-1442357210.gif

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Thanks for the gasket info, I started taking apart the aircleaner assembly and found a suprise. Someone had jammed a sock into the air intake just under the dust cap. I assume this was to help the air filter out as it was covered in grim. The oil pan was also full of dirt.

The question I have is I understand back in the day the airfilters wernt as good as what we have today. Is the wet bath filtration system more efficent then a high performance air filter I can get at Orileys?

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Thing about oil is it will catch a tremendous amount of dirt and still function. They don't filter as well and don't filter the same at different air flows. But that pan will hold a couple pounds of dirt.

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1. I'm not sure about the original fuel pump but if it is mounted on the block or timing cover it's most likely a simple cam/lever type system. A lever on the pump rides a cam lobe. If you go with an electric pump you want a low pressure pump. I would guess one that runs 1.5 to 5 PSI. Carbs and high pressure pumps don't work well

2. You as an officer/soldier have an asset unavailable to a lot of civilians as far as the gaskets are concerned. An old motor SGT can teach you how to do it or one of the assistants at the automotive craft shop should be able to too.

Rick

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Wow never thought about those guys knowing how to make gaskets, I will have to pay them a visit next weekend.

Another random question of a the day I know air filters are desigend to for air to flow through them in a certain direciton, woudl they work if the air went the other way?

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Some would not hold up to reverse pressure as the stiffness in the design is from the outside in. I guess it depends on the filter design.

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Presuming the pleats don't blow out a R99 ways, the layering in the paper is set to go one way with suction. Backwards will obviously do something, most likely not as well. Way better than nothing though.

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Wow never thought about those guys knowing how to make gaskets, I will have to pay them a visit next weekend.

Another random question of a the day I know air filters are desigend to for air to flow through them in a certain direciton, woudl they work if the air went the other way?

Hey just trying to be helpful. Some of the older enlisted and NCO mechanics can be a good source for learning things too. Depended on your attitude and that of your commander learning something like making a gasket shouldn't put either party at risk. Plus it never hurts to let the mechanics know you value their knowledge. They get stuff done a lot faster when they know they are appreciated and respected for their skills. I saw guys piss off the mechanics all the time then laughed at them when their tanks were broken and all the mechanics were busy with other tasks. That old adage about never making the cook or supply SGT mad should be extended to include the PAC NCOIC, the medics and the mechanics. For the infantry, scout and armor guys that means you add in the artillery guys that you don't want mad at you!

Anyway any progress? I had to take my MIL to see her sister in ID so I haven't gotten anything done on my D4 but plan on getting it fired up after supper today. I'll let you know after I try it.

Rick

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Went to the field for the last three weeks so havent had a chance to do much. To hit on your points tanker that is a addadge I haved lived by. In FA the people you want to make nice with are commo, mechanics, and the cooks. Let them ride around in a track for a bit and pull a laynared or two. You will be amazed at how fast you get coms and how reliable equipment will be.

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So I managed to get the hydrolic pump off the back. I was supprised to find the shaft that powered the pump seemed to be hard mounted into the rear of the tractor. It doesn't look stock to me but I don't see a way to get it off short of tearing the whole rear end apart. Is the metal sleeve the pump as hooked up to part of the tractor? I always thought it was part of the pump.

Also on that note isn't there supposed to be lubicating fluid inside the rear end? I opend it up and cant find a drop of lub anywhere.

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