Tanker916

1952 I/H T6 Crawler Project

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So I am a farm kid that went to all the tractor shows growing up and always wanted a crawler from the moment I saw one. Fast forward 16 years, 2 kids, and an active duty commission latter I now have the money to purchase one. I also want to get one in order for me and my son to have something to work on together.

Onto my experience, I was a M1A1 driver for several years while enlisted, since commissioning as a field artillery officer I have been assigned to tracked units. So one could say I am very familure with track drive systems. I also grew up on a farm and have decent experience working around and on tractors. That said I am by no means an expert, just someone that knows enough to get himself into trouble.

I came across this listing for a T6 and will be picking it up on the 18th. That said I would like to get the manual for it so I can start coming up with a plan on how to service it and begin the long process of getting it completely restored. Below is a link to the add;

http://www.tractorshed.com/cgi-bin/photoads/classifieds.cgi?search_and_display_db_button=on&db_id=592563&exact_match=on&photo_size=lrg&query=retrieval

With the information provided in the add could someone point me in the right direction for finding a PDF of the owner’s manual? When going through some of the older traffic I noticed people talking about a Z track link. I am not familure with this, could someone explain to me what it is and how the normal track links work? When you break track in the army it doesn't matter what link you start with is that no so with this type of track?

Also have no fear I have seen the previous traffic and will post lots of pictures when I get it.

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Welcome Aboard Tanker Thank You for your service

Crawler/Dozer chain Have a master link , There is basically 2 different styles , One is a bolt together arrangement where the link is split diagonal (with interlocking teeth or keys) I call them "sawtooth")

where they meet and are held together by the track pad bolts , The other style is a "press" master pin assembly , The reason you cannot break or separate track (on most modern designs)

chains is the bushings interlock into the adjoining links ,

This is a depiction of "master" pin and bushing

post-77390-0-43503300-1436327757_thumb.j

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I will say that odds are pretty low of it having a Z link. The master can normally be spotted by looking at the ends of the pins. Master will usually have a cross pin, kinda like a cotter key. They aren't real sophisticated. These chains are simple, but incorporate different principles that tank tracks.

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Master pins if later than the type with a keeper pin will have a dimple in each end where as the standard pins will be smooth on the ends.

They will be a press fit. If you drive them out with a punch and hammer, be sure to wear safety glasses. Eyes have been lost by flying

pieces of punch or pin.

Like MD said, you probably won't find a Z link (alligator link) on a T6.

I also have a T6, 1948.

Dennis

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Weld a piece of large cable to the punch for the guy holding it to use as a handle. It will prevent a crushed hand and will take some of the shock out of holding it.

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Removing the master link pin can be a chore. When I removed the tracks on the TD-14, I built a pin driver using a piece of axle shaft for the driver and welding a piece of pipe to some heavy channel iron. Position the driver on pin and drive the pin out with a heavy sledge hammer. Good idea to clean the pin area and put some penetrant on it also. When you go to put the pin back in, clean pin and bore well and put pin in freezer overnight. Then drive it in before it warms up. Jim.

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Wow thank you for all the information, the serial number is TBK 31965. With that information can someone tell me what manule I should hunt down?

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Take a look at the beginning of the construction forum there is a nice list of equipment serial numbers

Your T-6 is a 1952 http://www.redpowermagazine.com/forums/topic/64531-ih-construction-equipment-serial-numbers-engine-xrefs/

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Track system on a dozer is way different than the track systems on military combat vehicles plus the drive is very different. Trust me, I know. 19E/K 74-96.

Go find a maintenance officer from a Combat Engineer unit. They should be able to point you in the right direction.

Rick

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Nothing against Yesterday tractors , But the best reprints can be found here http://www.binderbooks.com/crawler.htm

and there is some reprints and originals on ebay http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2060353.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.XInternational+t-6+manual.TRS0&_nkw=International+t-6+manual&_sacat=0

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Thank you for all of the information, the drive to and from Californa was up there on my list of top 5 most painfull trips but I wont get into that. Onto the crawler, so I was pleasently surprised when the engine fired with hardly any cranking and drove around with no problems. I was troubled by everything else I saw on it.

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Overal the body doesn't look to bad considering it is over 60 years old. It now lives in my garage on base (stuipid housing rules...) In order to keep the tracks from tearing up the concrete I got some pallets made our ot 2X6's and made a path from the trailer to the garage.

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After lots of cursing and scrubing I got the hydrolic pump clean to the point I could read the plates.

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I suspect I will have to rebuild the pump but im not touching it till I get a hoist set up.

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The engine itself seems to be in good condition but everything else has me un happy. In particular I would like to have a conversation in a dark alley with who ever cut all the wiring for the electrical system.

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So the radiator that is on the tractor has more crap than I though possible in it. The cooling portion itself also has a dent the size of my fist in it and am amazed it doesnt leak like a siv. The extra radiator I have is rusted out on the resevor and receaving tank but has the shudders and cooling poriton that are intact, I am hoping to combine them and get a desenct radiator.

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congrats on the machine it looks nice. If you cruise around on this site there are some companies that will make you a new wiring harness. I have found binder books to be the best place for manuals. the UC gets it's percentage using measurements at specific points the pictures show a UC that looks pretty good. I was in Fort Bliss from 84 to 86 with the 3rd ACR. 19Delta

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The International badge in the front is a plus. You can't buy them anywhere and if they show up on E Bay, price is out of site.

Have fun with your project.

Engine parts same as Farmall M except M does not have the fuel pump.

Dennis

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I'd say it is in pretty good shape. Runs, rails look decent, sprockets aren't round, clutches are good, brakes work. That says a lot.

Odds are the hyd pump is okay unless it ran dry. If a valve spool leaks it can be helped along with an external locking cross valve thingy. BeGe made excellent gear.

The wiring had to go. It was in bad shape a long time ago, and the alternator made some of it superfluous. Pieces of insulation were falling off in the 80s. They did a nice thing with that big relay on the starter.

Dent?

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BE GE pumps only made 1000 psi when new,so if you can fit a ram that will lift your load with 800 psi the pump will run a long time.It has been a long time since I had one of that model apart but if like the larger models some new o rings on the ends of the spool valves will help with the leaking. Associated tractor in Stockton Ca has the parts but can get a little pricey. With wear I have not seen Be Ge valve that didn't leak in a long time.

If you want more modern hydraulic power buy a pump and valve from Surplus Center in Ne. Mount the pump to the front of radiator,valve and tank on the fender.All new parts,live power,and modern psi in the system, cost no more than a Be Ge rebuild.

Great that it runs and steers.

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Doug thanks for the information and boo dirty cav scout :P What do you mean by UC?

M Diesel below is a pic of the dent. From what I can tell it doesn’t leak but I have not run it for longer than 5 minutes at any given time because I have not done a proper PMCS on it.

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Ray thank you very much for the idea on modern hydraulic power idea. I have been thinking about taking a hybrid approach with this rebuild. IE get modern gages to replace the old gages. As it is I am already planning on getting some off road lights and mount them where the stock lights would go.

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Well that is different. Given the cost, I wouldn't touch the radiator just yet. Are those tubes crimped off or just bent?

You probably know but the gauge holes are standard size.

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That is a very, very, nice looking crawler , All the major bits and pieces look intact , Running and steering too !!!

I have seen quite a few original lights come and go on ebay, They are pretty cool looking with metal screen guards on them :)

What are your plans for it ?? work it ? restoration ?

The right track look a wee bit tight ,May just need to be worked a bit , No better time to make sure the track adjusters are in working order.

Disciples of Khorne ??

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Lol i play Warhammer 40k my hobby area is just to the right of that poster.

I plan on restoring it but also putting on modern equipment on it. IE modern Gage's and wiring.

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Don't worry about the radiator until it leaks or runs hot.The TD diesels are delicate,if they don't cool,or get a proper cool down before shut down you can crack heads. But it is still common to block a leaking tube or 2,with the kind of damage you are showing .The gas crawler may be a little tougher than the diesel.

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So after lots of cursing, drilling, and bandaids both radiators have been taken apart. I have never seen so much rust and dirt inside a mechanical system.

This picture is from the spare radiator.

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This is the bottom of the radiator that was on the tractor.

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These are the cores that I have. The one on the left is the core that was on the tractor, while the one on the right was the spare. The origninal has 4 tubes sealed and doesnt seam to have any other damage. While the spare seems to be missing a lot of fins and I think one of the tubes has a small hole in it.

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For now im thinking the one that was on the tractor is the one I should use, dent aside I think it is in better condition.

These pics are of the upper and lower resevours.

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Overall im I think the top resivour that was on the spare is in better condition than the one that was on the tractor. My only concern is the one on the spare seems to be missing the the attachment needed to put a cap on it. I assume it doesnt need the cap and a simple plug lid will work due to it not being a pressurized system is that a correct assumption?

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The resevour that is black on the inside is what was on the tractor and I think it is in better condition than the one on the spare.

And now to answer your questions as to why I didn't remove the radiator from the tractor before taking it apart....

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Im happy I noticed the cracks and damage prior to hooking up the lift. I guess what ever punched the radiator also punched this guy. the only thing holding it in place was the bolts, it was serving no structual purpose.

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Me after taking the parts to the car wash.......

And now onto why you should not watch the velocity channel on Sunday mornings, I wachted a truck show where they talked about working with old parts. One product they recomended was "Metal Rescue". Im certain the pics they showed were best case scenarious but I still thought I would give it a shot and see what happens. I found a gallon of it at Home Depot and currently have these two parts soaking in it. The label says 24 hours for heavy rust so I guess I know wether or not I wasted 25 bucks tomorrow.....

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Overall I would have to say the spare radiator was the toughetst part I have had to work on so far. Several of the bolts were rusted to the point of not only being stripped but correded to the point that the bolt heads where between wrench sizes. This forced me to drill out the head and break it off with a flat tip and 5 ibs hammer (hence the bandaids......)

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Consider the rest of your cooling system in similar condition: (

Best to descaler the whole thing, this was common in warm climates where antifreeze wasn't used...

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