Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Farmall504#20

The Great Farmall 806 VS JD 4020 Debate

Recommended Posts

Not sure how you say the 4020 was not a direct competitor to the 806.

Both rated roughly 85 drawbar and 95 pto

Now because one is heavier than the other so be it. That's part of the problem with the 4020. Kinda light and I felt it was a weak 95hp tractor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had both on our farm.

I liked them both, and they were very equal in the work they would do.

We pulled the same size equipment with both. Same plows and tillage equipment.

Each tractor had things I liked better than the other, but they were both good workers.

If someone is trying to say that one will out work the other, I would argue that one of them has their pump turned up.

We were getting the same horsepower out of both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 856 custom was to compete with the JD4000. The 826 was to compete with the 4020. That is what the IH salesmen told me back then. As for those who claim the 4020 was a direct competitor to the 806, go look at the Nebraska tests to see the real numbers. I have driven both of them(and also 4020 non power shift) and no way can a 4020 pull like the 806. The 4020 power shift was an 88 HP tractor while the 806 was a 95 PTO HP tractor. I also owned a 856 at one time and it dynoed stock (seals intact) at 105 HP and there is no way any 4020 could touch the 856 for power. You green lovers may love your green, and that is fine. But I lived through those years and drove them both and the 806 was bigger and more expensive than the 4020. I remember being offered a brand new 806 in the fall of 1967 and the selling price was bang on at $10,000. My father in law bought his 4020 power shift that same year and he paid $9000 for it. That is fact and fanciful discussions otherwise are not productive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The early 4020s were about half way between a 706 and an 806 They would pull 706 equipment 1 gear faster. The later (69-) were close to an 806, pull same equipment, same speed but no they did not lug same as an 806. Sure any tractor, even still set up factory can be hotter than the norm. Many 4020s were the same. My 1970 FWA powershift 4020 was a lot more tractor than my 1965 gear drive 4020. An 856 was a whole different tractor, with that 407, it had it all, power and lugging....James

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GEORGE - Your Dad got a good deal on his 4020. Neighbor Dad traded help with bought the first Side console 4020-D with synchro-range trans & WFE. $9000. Was delivered in the fall of the year, One Saturday Dad told me, "You HAVE to go chop corn stalks on the end rows for the neighbor!" I wasn't sure why, but I went up to his place.... and there was his shiny new 4020 hooked to the Brillion 6 ft chopper. Think the hour meter showed 3-4 hours on it. Before the end of January a Year-Round cab was installed, $1000. Following year the M&W turbo was installed.

LOT of 4020's sold around home, 90+% were all synchro-range. Farmer's didn't want the reduced drawbar HP the P/S produced. I'd say 20-25% were turbo'd too.

Not many 806's around home, but 706's were real popular, especially the gas version.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually worked as a mechanic for a John Deere dealer back in the early '70s. Many, many 4020s dynoed well over 100 horsepower, in stock form, as delivered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually worked as a mechanic for a John Deere dealer back in the early '70s. Many, many 4020s dynoed well over 100 horsepower, in stock form, as delivered.

I'd like to run one of those. Maybe it would change my mind. I run one that is Turbo'd and I doubt it would break 105. A white 2-105 or Oliver 1955 would eat its lunch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The truth is in the resale value. Whatever is worth more is your better tractor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^now that's not the right way to look at it. What if it costs more in repairs than you could ever get out of it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The father in law's 4020 was an early one with the console power shift and it never had the power the 806 and 856's I drove at the time had. John Deere recognized the power issue and the side console models had a small power increase to get them in line with an 806. But by then the 806 was out of production and they competed against the 100 HP 856's. As such they were still slightly less in power than the 856. That also was the time they started shipping 4020's with 18.4-38 tires instead of 18.4-34 inch tires. The 856 was commonly on 18.4-38 tires so Deere did that to compete. Only on the 856 Custom were 34 inch rear tires used.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We farm with a 4020 and a 856 for most things it doesn't make a difference which one I am on. The 856 puts power to the ground better but for mowing and baleing hay they are both good the 4020 is a little more nimble but that's it. I had a jd 4010 before the 856 and that was the biggest pile of junk ever. I was glad to get ride of it for the 856

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spent a lot of time on the seat of an 806 growing up. It was the big tractor on the farm for many years. I have also ran 4020s. As said both are good tractors in the field. But, in the shop I'll take an 806 all day long over a 4020. What a pain those green things are to work on. Now if an 806 came with a power shift, I think IH would have put John Deere out of business years ago.

That's like saying, "if I had a lot more money, I would be richer than you" Guess which company went out of business?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The honesty in your responses is something that would NEVER occur on a JD forum.

The honesty on this forum, is about as biased as a black church supporting Obama.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I don't think most people now days really care, just the hardcore on both sides. I wouldn't take an 856 to run a vac planter, nor would I roll into a field with our 5 btm set of whites on a 4020.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heavy tillage 806 running turbo on a 4020 is asking for trouble, they over heat but a turbo 4020 would keep up with a stock 806.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BOTH COULD BE HAD IN GASOLINE. WONDER WHICH ONE HAD THE MOST THIRST?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BOTH COULD BE HAD IN GASOLINE. WONDER WHICH ONE HAD THE MOST THIRST?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 856 custom was to compete with the JD4000. The 826 was to compete with the 4020. That is what the IH salesmen told me back then. As for those who claim the 4020 was a direct competitor to the 806, go look at the Nebraska tests to see the real numbers. I have driven both of them(and also 4020 non power shift) and no way can a 4020 pull like the 806. The 4020 power shift was an 88 HP tractor while the 806 was a 95 PTO HP tractor. I also owned a 856 at one time and it dynoed stock (seals intact) at 105 HP and there is no way any 4020 could touch the 856 for power. You green lovers may love your green, and that is fine. But I lived through those years and drove them both and the 806 was bigger and more expensive than the 4020. I remember being offered a brand new 806 in the fall of 1967 and the selling price was bang on at $10,000. My father in law bought his 4020 power shift that same year and he paid $9000 for it. That is fact and fanciful discussions otherwise are not productive.

Just because the hp between the two tractors was not exactly the same doesn't mean they weren't competitors. It was common especially back then for JD and IH to one up each other with their new models. You don't think IH made dang sure their new 806 had more hp then Deere's 4010. You don't think when JD was putting the finishing touches on the 4010 in the late 50s they made sure it would have more hp then anything IH had.

BTW, in 1964 we paid in $4,500 for a brand new 4020 diesel powershift with a cab. Dealer gave $5,021 for our 830.

post-79528-0-44860300-1400897292_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 4020 was made at same time as 806 856 966. Since a 806 would smoke a 4020 do we even look at others?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a gas 4020, could put 3 tanks [ 90-100 gallon ] a day trough it on 10ft discbine and not use headlights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a gas 4020, could put 3 tanks [ 90-100 gallon ] a day trough it on 10ft discbine and not use headlights.

Night vision that good???? ;):lol:

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deere never made a good tractor till the 50/55 series

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deere never made a good tractor till the 50/55 series

If we are going that route, IMO IH never made a tractor after the 56 series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have an 806. Pushing 12,000 hrs motor never been touched. New clutch 150 hrs ago. The tractor doesn't owe us a dime. When we needed something done it never let us down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites