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Tippmann98

How far apart to space fence posts for cattle?

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Been thinking about fencing in a few acres to raise our own beef and would be using wood posts. 4" round possibly with 6" for corner posts. Not real sure as I haven't been thinking about it long. Any suggestions on what you guys would use and how far to space the posts?

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1 rod for regular fence.

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I drive a 4-5" wood then a t post then wood 16 ft apart string 4 wire barbed . Build branches in corners and where the fence goes down in a gully and crests a rise. . If you space the post too far the wire will allow the cows to get thru as the wire will more up and down. There's are wire spacers that wove vertically to alleviate this. Pull wire tight as it will stretch and contract with the temperature. Pound the staples a bit loose so the wire can move. Building a fence on my terrain out here is a challenge to say the least.

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Depends on type and how doctical your cattle are Type of fence woven or barbed electric wire is fairly easy to hold cattle if thry are use to it

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Around this part of the woods I would want a 20" post for a corner and we use a combination of 7' steel T posts and one hedge post for every 10 T posts.Also prefer 48" woven wire with one barb wire on top.

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My neighbor has 1200 head of buffalo on his ranch. He runs 2 wire electric high tensile. Well pipe then fiberglass about 50 ft apart. If you get 4 -5ft away you will get jolted. Lot of current. Oh , he has strung 125 miles of this fence. It works for him

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16ft per Wood post. Wood / T / Wood or Wood / T / T / Wood. Depending what I'm trying to hold / Number of animals / etc.

NO BARB for me. HiTensile smooth is 10 times easier to work with, and can be easily electrified.

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I'll tell you right now the downfall of most fences is the owners do not keep them TIGHT. If the wires are loose you can't get enough wire or posts to turn a cow. On the other hand lots of places 2 good wires will hold the cows if they are not used to getting out.

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The answer depends greatly on how many head in how big of an area. My close up yards are no more then 8 foot spacing, all railroad ties with continuous panels or sucker rod. My pastures are 15 foot spacing with four stands of 4 point barb. I like all wood posts but some pastures are wood/steel/steel/wood.

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1 rod for the wood posts with a T-post in between.

Allan

How long is a rod? I used to know back when I took a surveying class in college, but that was a LONG time ago.

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My neighbor has 1200 head of buffalo on his ranch. He runs 2 wire electric high tensile. Well pipe then fiberglass about 50 ft apart. If you get 4 -5ft away you will get jolted. Lot of current. Oh , he has strung 125 miles of this fence. It works for him

Huh? So you're saying you will get a jolt from that electric fence just by getting within 4-5' of the fence? How does that work? Sorry but that sounds a bit far fetched.

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We use 6' T posts 10' apart with 5 strands of barb wire. 6" steel corner posts 3 to a corner and weld diagonal braces.

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I use old corn cribs that I flatten out use railroad ties in either four or five foot centers depends on the crib best part over six foot tall never had one jump or go through

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All of our feedyard posts are 3 average steps apart,we used 5 barbed wires on some with a separate hot wire and 6 hi-tensile wires with the two in the middle hot on some newer pens. The hi-tensile is definitely easier to work with since you just have a spring to keep it tight but it is almost invisible from a hundred feet away. Most of the old four and five wire field fences around here have not been kept up very well for the last 30 years or they have been taken out so a lot of cows that are grazing stalks in the winter are kept in with a single hot wire, as long as they have something to eat they are content to stay put. Pasture fences are kept up pretty well though on account of the pesky calves getting out in the spring.

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My neighbor has 1200 head of buffalo on his ranch. He runs 2 wire electric high tensile. Well pipe then fiberglass about 50 ft apart. If you get 4 -5ft away you will get jolted. Lot of current. Oh , he has strung 125 miles of this fence. It works for him

Huh? So you're saying you will get a jolt from that electric fence just by getting within 4-5' of the fence? How does that work? Sorry but that sounds a bit far fetched.

The fences have to have high current to keep those shaggy critters in.they respect the fences but will doze. Their way through if they want. After a period of time he shuts off the voltage. The buffalo are rather intelligent creatures. His calving rate is 99%.they forage in 10000 acre pastures.if. the snow is deep he hays them. Quite an operation

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My neighbor has 1200 head of buffalo on his ranch. He runs 2 wire electric high tensile. Well pipe then fiberglass about 50 ft apart. If you get 4 -5ft away you will get jolted. Lot of current. Oh , he has strung 125 miles of this fence. It works for him

Huh? So you're saying you will get a jolt from that electric fence just by getting within 4-5' of the fence? How does that work? Sorry but that sounds a bit far fetched.

The fences have to have high current to keep those shaggy critters in.they respect the fences but will doze. Their way through if they want. After a period of time he shuts off the voltage. The buffalo are rather intelligent creatures. His calving rate is 99%.they forage in 10000 acre pastures.if. the snow is deep he hays them. Quite an operation

Yeah I get the premise, I just think it sounds a bit unreasonable to think an electric fence could handle enough juice to deliver a shock 4-5' away from the fence. You'd be talking about enough voltage to kill anything that actually touched it even if a power grid could sustain that kind of draw. I don't know...something sounds wonky.

I've been around a bison ranch some, they are some headstrong SOB's for sure.

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One of the times I have come close to shitting myself, was when I stopped to look at the buffalo in a pasture just south of Bucklin, KS, and they all decided to run over to the 'normal' barbed wire fence to see what I was doing. I figure the owner had been feeding them out of his pickup, so they thought I was the delivery boy that day.

The first time I saw buffalo up close, was when my Dad took me up to Valley, NE to look at a bunch in a pen, they were making that pipe fence shake and rattle pretty good.

I copied my Dad's way of building fence, using new railroad ties for the corner/gate posts, braced back to a 5 inch wood post, and alternating with a steel post every eight feet. This puts a wood post every 16 feet (I had forgotten about 'rods'), with 5 strings of barbed wire. (In Texas a 4 wire fence is considered 'poor-boy', and I even had my neighbor tell me that 4 wires "wouldn't hold his cows", which seemed pretty strange, given that the only time they ever came close was to lay in the shade, or when the bull would come down stand in the corner to look (until he got tired of me calling him 'queer'), or the calves would come over to look at the dog.

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