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fireballv82003

F20 Farmall Pistons High Altitude, decipher part#

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Hey all,

Set of rods/pistons on ebay says-

farmall f20/regular 3 3/4" high compression/high altitude pistons/rods.

good condition has numbers 763 de luxe and 2660 d inside pistons

Anyone know what these part #s are for sure?

I need a set for a T20 Crawler (f20 engine with a water pump). I want beef it up a little.

Also, I Balster's shows a sleeve/piston set the below price.

Has anyone dealt with them?

Just says hi compression

Farmall IHC
F-20
3 3/4
4
G11HC
Hi-Comp
$580.00

Any thoughts on either of these would be helpful.

I might call Balsters tomorrow.

Thanks

Mike

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Those are aftermarket pistons , I think there was 3-4 different compression pistons(different altitude) you could get.

Kevin

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Is there a problem with your pistons ?? Your T-20 will have replaceable wet-style liners,

and yes the 4" pistons will fit by boring the liners . On the piston wear , well every engine is

different , there is full specifications for wear limits in the manuals, They are a relatively

low rpm engine , with fairly low compression, fairly forgiving compared to some of the more

modern engines with super tight tolerances, Im sure you have heard the stories of Ford

Model T's developing a rod knock and being repaired on the road with a oil soaked leather belt :)

Kevin

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I have heard of that rod bearing story, only with an F-20 as the tractor and engine. The story as I heard it, was during the hard times during WW II when parts and money were hard to get. An F-20 had a rod bearing go out. The farmer opened the hand hole cover found the bearing out. He got a piece of bacon rind and cut it to fit around the crankshaft and bolted the rod back around the rind. The story goes that he never did replace the bacon rind.

GT&T

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A guy told me about 4" pistons and sleeves. Were they drop in or did you have to bore the block?

As far as using used ebay pistons, what do you guys think about used pistons? Someone said they don't wear much, just the bore.

Not so with automotive pistons, I don't have to much experience with 3lb cast iron pistons, what do you all think?

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I am sorry to say that Balsters closed up a couple years ago. Unblievable sale though last year. Sale of the century in my books. Four sale rings a day for 3 straight days.

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I was thinking of using high alt. pistons as I was going to run it on gas only with a gas manifold. Upping the compression with high alt pistons would up power some.

THere was enogh water in the block that i am wondering if the liners leaked. Didn't look like any went down the bores, no rust or rust ring where the pistons were stuck.

I don't want to get it back together and find out the liners were seeping. I'd rather pull them and clean every thing up.

Can you get liners for the f20?

I saw liners/pistons somewhere for 1000 bucks. That seems high.

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I have a set of good used F20 sleeves and pistons too, if you are interested.

I would not be afraid of using used pistons. I have rebuilt several pre 1939 IHC engines with good used pistons and sleeves and new rings, they all have good compression, start well and run just fine.

If you want more power, you can have have rust pitted 3 3/4" sleeves bored to 4" and buy a new set of 4" pistons from Rice Equipment.

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Should I pull the lners?



Would making a few block off plates for the water inlets, then filling the block with water and seeing if it drips work to see if the liners were seeping? (head off engine)


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It is relatively easy to pull the liners, clean them up ,clean the block up, and reseal the liners.

Liner seals are available , I don't know if you have the head off yet but making a test plate

for the engine would be quite involved there is a LOT of water passages ,Your plate would also

have to have the ability to hold the liners down in their counter bores ( same as the head )

I think you are better off cleaning ,resealing liners ,installing all your rotating assemblies

then bolt the head back on with fresh gaskets ,hook up all your water manifolds,radiator etc.

then do a leak test before you put the oil pan up, These are a non-pressurized system but you

could safely test at 10-15 psi just for good measure,

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