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acem

What to check on a JD4020?

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I know this is a red forum but I am a regular here and need some help.

My friend is scaling way back (to about 40 acres) and is selling off alot of his equipment. He has sold me a few items already and wants me to buy a few more including his JD 4020. However I am an IH man and have never done anything more than drive a JD and don't even know what to look for on the tractor.

Normally I would not even consider A JD tractor because I don't know much about them but I have been around this tractor most of my life. His dad bought it almost new and they have only farmed a few hundred acres. It was their tillage tractor when they bought it. A few years later they bought a 4230 and it became their planter/cultivator tractor. It has mostly sat for the last ten years (his brother has been brushogging 10 acres with it. The tractor was an open station but now has a home made two post canopy. It has the sychro range transmission and is a diesel.

What do I need to check on the tractor? What are the problem areas on a 4020? I know the engine & trans work ok but sometimes the little things can cost alot too.

If I buy the tractor it will be a chore tractor not tillage. I am planning on going back to cultivating next year and was considering another cat 2 tractor.

Thx-Ace

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Make sure the syncro linkage and gates are tight with a minimum of slop.Have the brakes been serviced regularly?If they were allowed to get wore down to far it puts shavings through out the Hydro system,real big problem on a powershift tractor.Basically make sure it's a field ready tractor.You can get a boatload of money into a 4020 nowadays way out of proportion to the usefulness and value of the tractor.I still would like to own a good one, they are handy but they are way overpriced.

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I would want one of the '69-72 models with the 12 V system, and the new style SCV's, Also, as mentioned check the wear in the shift linkage, and I would make sure that the steering valve has NO leaks (I doubt if most dealerships have anyone that can rebuild one anymore).

Remember that you are dealing with a tractor that can be 49 years old, or as 'new' as 41 years old.

I had a 1972, (SN 268XXX) which was my 'toy', but the person who bought it, was actually going to farm with it.

I bought mine from the second owner, who lived about 1 1/2 miles away, so I had that advantage, along with the fact that it had always been serviced at the local dealer.

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exSW is correct on the shift linkage. A worn synchro range is a PITA to shift so it stays in gear. Even back in 1970 my Cousin had to rebuild his shift linkage in his '65 4020 and even when rebuilt was never quite as tight as when new. And the wet brakes do exaclty what exSW says too, when worn too far they contaminate the entire rearend & hyd system. BIG job getting all the brass shavings out of the rear tub, hyd pumps & coolers.

If we knew if it was an early or late 4020-D, '64 to '69, or a later side console it would help. Almost more difference between the early & side console 4020's than there is between an 806 & 856. The WFE under a 4020 was pretty robust, but I preferred the Roll-a-matic NFE. The WFE doesn't turn very tight at all, and the NFE doesn't turn all that tight either but turns sharper than the WFE. The early 4020's had a 24V starting system and ran all the elec. items on 12V. Very troublesome system. JD even made a conversion pkg to convert them all back to 12V start & lights, etc. The later side console tractors were all 12V from factory. Make sure this tractor is 12V.

Check the six weep holes on the left side of the block, make sure there's no sign of coolant discoloring the paint below the holes. The 4020 was a wet sleeve engine, they didn't tend to cavitate like IH engines but o-ring sealing problems were fairly common. Never actually saw one leak oil out the weep holes, always antifreeze. If you'll be doing chore in winter, ablock heater will be needed, especially if the tractor is still 24V start, 4020's weren't as good a starting tractor in codl weather as most IH's. I;d say about on a par with a IH Nuess diesel.

The early 4020's had the engine oil filter buried under the cover on the left side of the oil pan with the four bolts holding the cover. Terrible mess to change oil/filter. Side console tractors had a spin-on filter on the right side, much cleaner & easier to service. Early tractors had oil bath air cleaners, later tractors had dry type w/pleated paper elements, all mounted up frt ahead of the radiator beside the fuel tank.

The hyd pump is driven off the frt of the crankshaft in the frt bolster. It's not unusual for the pump drive coupling to strip out and leave you with no hyd, brakes, or P/S. It's a rather major job to R&R the drive coupling too. WFE has to come off, not sure how much you have to remove with NFE. The BTO I worked for back in HS's #1 '64 4020 fieldwork tractor stripped the coupling in about 1968 or '69. Was in the shop in town during the peak of corn planting for 2-3 days. That tractor only ever did fieldwork, chopped haylage & corn. Never had a loader on it, biggest thing it ever lifted was the F145 5-14 plow & 14 ft JD disk.

The rear PTO speed change on a 4020 is MUCH improved over the 3010/4010, but still not in the same league as an IH. The rear PTO stub shaft is held on with a large internal snap ring. Pull the snap ring, remove the stub shaft and insert the other stub shaft. There's a small rod that runs thru a hollow shaft that shifts the speed change gears up in the frt of the transmission and you have to make sure that rod shifts properly or you'll tear the speed change gears up which requires a double split of the tractor to repair. There's a small protrusion on the one stub shaft that should shift the gears. Then reinsert the snap ring. The 3010/4010's used four 3/8" capscrews and two dowel pins to locate the stub shafts. The capscrews tended to work loose and start letting the speed change gears "shift" while running. NOT a good thing. One nice feature of the 3010/4010/3020/4020 was they all had a 1000 RPM front facing PTO on the bottom front of the rearend for running side mounted sickle mowers and also worked great for running spray pumps for applying herbicide while planting and that left the rear PTO free to run a hyd pump to run a hyd drum Cyclo planter. Same PTO lever ran both frt & rear PTO's.

The hyd system was a high volume high pressure system, something around 2000 PSI, and a 4020 was a good loader tractor. Their P/S was as good as any and better than most, same with their power brakes when they worked right. I never got to run a 4020 cultivating corn or beans, but cultivated a LOT of acres with Dad's 4010 & 4-38 frt mounted culitvator. Of all the things I did with that tractor I liked cultivating the most. With the foot throttle you could drive it like a truck, one hand/arm resting on the fender, one on the steering wheel. Only problem was the WFE didn't turn tight enough to take 4 rows and turn and take the next four rows. I had to skip four and take the second four. With a wider say 6-30 frt mount cultivator you should be able to take six, turn and take the next six. Or with a rear mount culitvator you can use the inside brake and pull the frt around tighter. With our frt mount cultivator you hit the inside brake and you ended up dragging the inside tire along and tearing out a LOT of the endrows. Took me one round to realize THAT wasn't going to work. Ohhh and the 4010 only had one set of remotes, so the 3-pt rockshaft ran the left side of the cultivator with a 2" dia bar running along the left side of the platform about six inches off the platform. Just the right height to trip you when getting off the tractor to the left and do a face plant into the cultivator. But a tractor with two sets of remotes or a rear mounted cultivator fixes that.

A stock 4020-D should burn around 5 gal of fuel an hour when working fairly hard, plowing, disking, field cultivating. On light loads they'll burn more fuel than an IH, mostly because of the direct driven Hyd pump I think. And the 404 CID engine won't run as long between rebuilds as an IH 361 or 407, or a 300/400 series. Plus they don't really like to be turned up too much. They'll blow head gaskets. BT-DT. And they tend to run a little hotter than an IH. Something to do with the small frt grill and side grills, and the intake & exh ports both being on the same side of the engine. The IH cross-flow head design was much better for cooling.

But they're a comfortable tractor to spend a day on.

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If your worried about it, I'll buy it and save you from worrying............I laugh when I read these posts, we got two of that series here(4020 and a 4000) and their isn't nothing that can't be rebuilt/replaced on them via Deere or the aftermarket. Shift linkage gets wore, not hard to rebuild, seat suspension is the same, hydraulic pump couplers/issues are overblown...........Have the radiator cooked out, that helps keep them cool. Don't worry about the weep holes, probably has been rebuilt by now and modernized liners/seals have cured all the weep issue. Side consoles are worth more, but the older ones still bring money here................Its very hard to loose money on a 4020 IF you get it bought reasonable. 4020 here is a '66 and has an M&W Turbo on it, fan off a 4230, and when you put the fuel to it, she is very impressive. We just use it as a chore tractor now, but it still is way more handy than an IH because of the easy shifting for that job.

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I forgot another common problem with 3010/4010/3020/4020 JD's. The 3-pt draft sensing is via a "bending bar" located down low and far to the back in the main rearend housing, well below the oil level, and the bar sees oil between the two sides of the rear casting, so the seals have to seal in ALL your transmission/rearend/hyd oil. And that casting the 3-pt lower arms attach to also pulls your drawbar if I remember correctly, so those seals see stress/movement even on drawbar loads. And they do O-K for a while, then they leak, and can leak a lot real quick, like a couple gallon an hour so the ten gal of oil in a Synchro-range tractor can be lost in less than half a day if you don't notice the leak. There's a guy who's advertized in FARMSHOW magazine every issue for the last 30+ yrs that has some new style seal that's supposed to last longer but he doesn't state the price, so like most JD parts, you can't afford them but have to have them.

While most of the 4020's around home, and there were a L-O-T of them, were dependable, reliable tractors, there was never a shortage of work for either one of the two JD dealers and all their mechanics and the independent shops or farmers that did tractor repair around home when these tractors were new. Our old 4010 was a MONEY PIT. There was ALWAYS something cropping up that needed parts and work and down time to fix, mostly when it was needed for work. It was outr big fieldwork tractor. Did plowing, disking, cultivating and pulled our little #30 JD combine over 20-30 acres of oars every year. Maybe put 125 to 150 hrs a year on it. And there was something ALWAYS wrong with it. And some stuff, like the P/S that when you plowed 1/4 mile long furrows, you turned the steering wheel slowly one full turn to the left to keep the frt furrow wheel against the furrow wall in one trip across the field. Not a big thing, but unless you looked, or bumped into it, you never knew where the steering wheel spinner was going to be. Kinda frustrating. And I'm sure having the local dealer try to fix it would have cost BIG bucks, it was leaking internally, not externally so we just lived with it. And the brakes drug, both of them. I ran the 4010 the 5 miles to town& 5 miles back for 5000# of hog feed once. Pulled in the yard at home, came up the 250 ft driveway, went to stop and shift up to park. The brake grabbed and locked * slid one wheel and didn't release until a couple seconds after I took my foot off the brake pedal. I was stopped by then, tractor rolled a bit, then I put my foot back on the brake and stopped the rolling, THEN shifted into park. The brakes shouldn't work like that. May have been something simple like bleeding the brakes would have cured it, but I bet the problem would have returned in a day or two. It wasn't a problem doing fieldwork, you wouldn't even notice it, you weren't going fast enough or never even used the brakes. But I went back to getting feed with the Super H after that one time. And it was better to grind the tread off on a set of 12.4X38 4-ply than to wear out a nearly new set of 15.5X38 8-ply GY Power-Torques. And we ALL know how good the small disk brakes were on the SH's, 300's, 350's, but at least they didn't lock up and slide the tires.

Then there was the day I was plowing and one of the right side tie rod ends separated the ball from the socket, only thing holding the tie rod on the tractor was the other tie rod end. As long as I kept the right frt tire in the furrow I could continue going, but once I hit the headland I was done, tire turned one way or the other clear against the stop and I had to walk home, get a bunch of tools and remove the tierod. And this was on a relatively low hour tractor, maybe had 2500-3000 hours in only 5-6 yrs and never even smelled a manure loader? There were many times I'd have to come home from doing fieldwork to work on the tractor, but that was one of the few times I had to walk home. I remember putting two waterpumps on that tractor, both because they leaked. And the generator and starter both were rebuilt in the 4 yrs we had it, and it had at least two sets of batteries in four years. Dad bought the thing a week or so before Christmas. And by the time we started fieldwork in April it had four new tires, new paint, was tuned-up, all the fluids & filters changed, new JD block heater installed so it would start below 40 degrees. Then we find out a five yr old tractor that already had been rebuilt with the "4020 Kit", but "Burned a little Oil" according to the seller at the auction, was burning 4-5 quarts of oil (no leaks, just burning) per 34 gal tank of fuel, about 6-7 hrs of running. Dad could have bought a brand new 706 German diesel or 756 for what he dumped into that 4010 in the four yrs he owned it. He paid $3600 for the tractor and repairs included a complete major engine rebuild the last winter he owned it,, new M&W sleeves & pistons, new main & rod bearings, blue-printed conn rods, rebuilt head, the rebuilt inj. pump had maybe 40 hrs on it at the time, the new tires & paint, etc. etc must have been at least another $3500-$4000 in parts & repair over four years. And Tractordata says a 756 was $8300 in 1971 and a 706 was $6100 in '67. So yes, a new 706 would have done everything that 4010 did and then some, and used less fuel while doing it and been worth a lot more at Dad's auction in Dec. '72. Then about mid-July Dad 1972 was bush-hogging some weeds with it around the buildlings and some grass waterways, it was the only tractor we had with live PTO for mowing in tight quarters, and the Throw-out bearing in the PTO clutch went out. Tractor was run the 25 miles to the independent shop he was using then and spilt for a new engine & PTO clutch. And Dad sold it right out of that shop, think he may have got $4000 for it, but the bill for the clutch was probably $1000. And within a year, the kid who bought it had it back in that shop for another repair, don't know what exactly, about everything except the transmission, final drives, brakes & hyd pump had already been repaired at least once. We know, because the kid had the guts to come over one night and expected Dad to pick up all or at least half of the repair bill on a used tractor bought "As Is - Where Is" a year before. So that tractor's dismal history continued.

So ACEM, I completely understand you wanting to know about what to look for on a 4020, and ask your neighbor buddy about on the history of this tractor. I could counter all of TP's comments critiquing my prior post since I was running these tractors years before he was born, back when they were new still and well remember what problems we and other people had with them. Typical run time before engine rebuild was 4000 to 5000 hours if the tractor did any fieldwork, which they ALL did, and I know a few were rebuilt with even less hours, so yes, I'm sure a 45-50 yr old 4020 has been rebuilt at least once, probably twice, and I hope JD or the aftermarket figured out how to keep the o-rings from leaking around the liners. I've seen several 4020-D's with wooden pegs pounded in the weep holes to keep the anti-freeze from leaking down the block. That's NOT the preferred repair method. The dry single plate clutch on them always worked well, pedal effort was low, engagement was smooth, but they don't take slipping or riding the clutch any better than a newer IH, and you still have to split the tractor to replace the clutch. When I was doing fieldwork with a 4010/4020, I NEVER took off with the plow or disk in the ground, I always raised the plow or disk before I stopped and pulled out of the land I was working, then got going again and dropped the plow/disk back in the ground, saved a LOT of clutch wear over time. Dad didn't do that and I could tell the difference in the clutch if he ran it half a day.

And another nice feature of the 3020/4020 was the diff lock. I used it a L-O-T doing fieldwork, especially plowing. Missed it big time on the 4010, it wasn't even an option on the 3010/4010. And the 3020/4020 only had two reverse gears, slow reverse was down below 1st & 3rd, fast reverse was below 2nd & 5th. The 3010/4010's had a third reverse below 4th & 7th, and actually you can get a 4th reverse with a little cutting/grinding on the dash panel below 6th & 8th, but that would be like a 14 MPH reverse, not real useful, the 3rd reverse in 3010/4010's was 8-1/2 MPH, plenty fast IMO.

Neighbor Dad traded help with and farmed an extra 80 acres with got the first side console 4020-D our local dealer sold. It had maybe 5 hours when I ran it chopping stalks with a Brillion 2-row chopper one Saturday morning. Guy farmed 2 80's a mile apart plus did half the work on the 80 he farmed with Dad. He hauled his mix-mill down to his other 80 every other day all year long so the first winter his 4020 got a Year-a-Round cab, second year it got an M&W turbo so it could be a real 5-bottom tractor in our clay hills, meaning using 5th as the plowing gear. We ended up only pulling 4-14's with our 4010, just not heavy enough for 5-14's, we tried that the first year we had it. With the neighbor pulling his 5-bottom plow, and 15 ft disk he got along fine with his 4020 when turbo'd, but NOBODY else ever ran that tractor after that. The BTO I worked for had a pair of '64's he ran until '70 and traded for a 4020 & 4320, and later bought a neighbor's 4020-G and other than the hyd pump drive coupling on the one '64 never really had any problems with any of them, think he still has the 4320 today. And the two neighbor kids across the road had a pair of 4020's with HUGE turbo's off a big Cummins engine, big holes cut in the hoods to feed the air into & out of them and big dry-type air cleaners bolted to the frames to feed the turbo. They pulled them in tractor pulls. My Cousin was good friends with them, and supposely the ran them at 200-250 HP for farming, and 400-450 HP for pulling, but they were were expensive toys. They tried to pull 6-16's in our clay hills with them, they could only plow in 5th gear, the rearends wouldn't stand the strain in 4th, and I snooped one day where they had plowed, they were only plowing 4-5 inches deep most places and even shallower on clay hills. They grew up farming some lighter sandier ground 10 miles away where they could use that big plow on a little tractor. Only other guy who had a 6-16 plow back then was the BTO who farmed that 320 acres for a couple years before them with his 1206, 756-D, & 4020-D P/S. And both years he used the 756 & 4020 to pull 4-14 IH #60 or 70 plows.

Anyhow, I know both Dale560 & Pete23 worked for JD dealers for several years each and hopefully they add some insight to this post.

I guess you could buy it, get the "good neighbor discount", then mark it up $3000 and sell it to TP since he wants another Deere so bad.

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Their is nothing wrong with a 4020, we put a lot of hours on ours and you guys are blowing it out of proportion. Keep on posting nonsense I am laughing. Yes, they have issues, but everything I have problems with were not even posted yet. Biggest issue I have with them(and really only the syncro) is the fact the charge pump in the rear only runs with the clutch out, which is fine for 90% of farm use, but with ours running a dump cart all fall in the tomato field, it is somewhat a challenge to load a trailer when you need to go to neutral to supply the main pump to get enough oil to run up the big dump cylinders. Another problem is the 3pt lift height, but IH's of the same vintage have the same issue, so that really isn't a deere only issue.

Also, up until this year we were putting 300+ hrs/year on our 4020, planting, ripping, cultivating, sidedressing, dump cart, and auger work................. it did/or could do anything on the farm our newer 100 hp tractors could.........So I can back up my big mouth, they were ahead of their time and the red guys won't/never will admit it.............You can't take a 756 and run a new 1750 Deere Vac planter and run it of its hydraulic system like you can with a new generation deere. That right their speak volumes about the engineering that went into them put them ahead then, and still makes them useable now.

Here is me planting our soybean plot last year with our 4020...........6-30 1750 Vac

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KF1DGHuAs14

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Wow Dr. Evil. That's impressive. Can you come up with that much material for what to look for on a 1256?

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big things to look for would the price and where the hydraulic controls are. most are on the steering column which suck and then there are some of the later ones that are down on the floor where they belong. for the price that varries ive seen them sell for next to nothing then ive seen them sell for crazy dollars. whats nice is that its a diesel which to me is a plus to me. if it runs good and has good paint and not worn out i wouldnt pay nothing more than 9 for it thats what they would around here

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As said before check the weep holes for leakage and make sure nobody squirted RTV in them. Check the oil filter cover on the oil pan (if it is that style) for any cracks. I have put some time on a 4020 and I think they are an enjoyable tractor to drive.

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I better go put dads 4020 away before it falls completely apart. the steering problems are usually orings in the front bolster the same as a farmall tractor. we live in 4020 country and there is not one thing I have not had apart on them. we have had some problems with dads 4020 but about the same as you have with any ih tractor. one thing I will say they are one of the handiest tractor to use. most but not all are twelve volt now but the 24 system worked also. most of the old time guys that could fix a generator are gone so you just switch them over.

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There were NEVER any 4020's that had the oil filter mounted in any place other than the oil pan, unless they had been re-engined with a block from a 4320.

It was a whole lot LESS messy to change the filter by loosening the 4 nuts, and letting the housing drain, than it was to loosen the horizontal oil filter, and letting it drain down the side of the block, and onto the frame rails.

As far as the coupler on the hydraulic pump, the FOUR cushions can be replaced in about 20 minutes, to change out the PTO stub shafts, make sure the nose of the tractor is lower than the back to minimize the loss of oil. The metal in the hydralic system can be minimized by putting cow magnets in the suction screen, which I doubt if most people know where it is located., and I have NEVER seen ANY JD, from ANY era, other than the EARLY General Purpose models with the foot controlled hydraulic lift, with the hydraulic controls "on the floor". The breakable pin on the PTO was done away with when the 20 series came out, to the nay-sayers about the shifter, you seem to forget the IH 06 series, and the re-designed shift mechanism on the 56 series.

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TP - Glad you enjoy my posts. But you also have talked mighty highly of the old poppin johnny's here too, and I think I've stated here many times what I think of them. So we'll never agree on much, we never have. Yep, we used to run a LOT of big hyd dump carts with 4010's & 4020's during tomato harvest around my part of the midwest..... NOT! But the same thing you complain about would be a problem doing loader work wouldn't it. For doing field work, raising/lowering plows, disks, cultivators, doing row crop work that was never a problem, at least for me since I always did that while moving. I suspect all that huge hyd PSI & volume is why a 4020 burns up to a gallon more fuel per hour all the time too compared to most other brands of tractors. No such thing as a "free lunch" you know. That big PSI & volume all costs HP and HP takes fuel.

Acem wants to know what problems 4020's had. Many of us here have tried to tell him what to watch out for. You're just telling him that they can be fixed, but as we found out with our not-so-old 4010 45 yrs ago, down-time, parts & repair labor really makes a HUGE dent in the bottom line at the end of a year. That's what he's trying to avoid. And if that humors you..... well, I guess you can laugh if you want.

Yes, we had problems occasionally with the FARMALL's, the SM-TA lost the T/A the second spring Dad owned it, then he became a pro at keeping it adjusted. The 450 never had any T/A problems, but the bull pinion shaft bearings would wear, get loose, and had to be replaced, left side the second year we had it, right side the next year. Same thing as the 560 rearend problems. And about 1965 the 450 went to town for new paint, and somehow the painter screwed up the hyd system sand blasting it, plus did a really poor paint job, he painted over loose sand on the hood in several areas. Month after we brought it home freshly painted it had to go back to the dealer in town to have the hyd fixed. Not exactly sure what the problem was but the bill was a couple Hundred Dollars, more than the piant job was worth. And the '51 M had to be split and rearend work done twice in the 1960's. One time it was a cracked transmission input yoke, but it got all new seals, gaskets, & bearings while apart, then 5-6 yrs later had to be split again for something else, can't remember what that problem was, but it was rather minor. Neither the '39 H or Super H ever had much for problems, they didn't make enough HP to hurt themselves. But I do remember Dad rebuilding the carb on the SH once for some reason, then taking it to town for rebuilding because it was still acting up.

The BTO who farmed the 320 acres across the road, the one with the 1206, 756 Nuess, & 4020 P/S... had a brand new 6-30 IH planter, a pre-Cyclo model, which was pretty big for it's time. The 4020 had cab, heater, and I think factory air, 756 was open station. Guess what he planted & cultivated with? Yep, the 756. The culitvator was even a front mount, while everybody else was switching to rear mounts. When that BTO's son who was 2 yrs older than me took over farming, all the red equipment disappeared and was replaced with green. I'm not even sure he's still farming. Rick1086 here would know for sure, he used to work for him and only lives 6-8 miles away.

As I've said, there were lots of 4020's around home, and some were trouble free, but many had one or more of the issues park them for a while, and in case you didn't understand my prior posts, they are a comfortable tractor to run. Our 4010 was just a PITA to keep running, but when it was running good it was a nice tractor to run.

BIG BUD GUY - Sorry, never spent any time around 1256's, but I know there's people here who can tell you ALL about them. Most of the problems with anything from a 706 on up to a 1486 would apply to the 1256.

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There were NEVER any 4020's that had the oil filter mounted in any place other than the oil pan, unless they had been re-engined with a block from a 4320.

It was a whole lot LESS messy to change the filter by loosening the 4 nuts, and letting the housing drain, than it was to loosen the horizontal oil filter, and letting it drain down the side of the block, and onto the frame rails.

As far as the coupler on the hydraulic pump, the FOUR cushions can be replaced in about 20 minutes, to change out the PTO stub shafts, make sure the nose of the tractor is lower than the back to minimize the loss of oil. The metal in the hydralic system can be minimized by putting cow magnets in the suction screen, which I doubt if most people know where it is located., and I have NEVER seen ANY JD, from ANY era, other than the EARLY General Purpose models with the foot controlled hydraulic lift, with the hydraulic controls "on the floor". The breakable pin on the PTO was done away with when the 20 series came out, to the nay-sayers about the shifter, you seem to forget the IH 06 series, and the re-designed shift mechanism on the 56 series.

+1, although some people see the spin on for the M&W Turbo and think that is the lone filter which isn't true. I like red paint for alot of things, and green for others, but to say a 4020 was nothing but a down time ridden machine is complete false unless you are completely clueless on how to run tools and properly put on parts. I'd buy another one without hessitation.

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The large volume hydraulics needs to have an asterick and a foot note added to it, especially for the 10 series. It is true that they had plenty of hydraulics but only for a short period of time.The front hydraulic pump is fed by the transmission pump which runs only when the clutch is engaged. The front pump was able to put out 18 gpm while the transmission pump only provided 6 gpm. The oil cooler above the front pump served as a reservoir to make up the difference. The 4010 cooler only held about two gallons of oil so you had 18 gpm until the reseerve was used up but then you were limited to 6 gpm provided that the transmission pump was running.

While I was working for an IH dealer we sold a post hole digger to a farmer that was all green and soon came back in complaining that the auger would slow way down after using it just a little bit. After expalining to him the way the hydraulics worked on his green machines we ended up delivering a demo tractor for him to try out. He bout ine before the week was over.

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Thanks for all the information. I think the tractor is good (I drove it a few years ago and it has not been used much since). It does have several hydraulic leaks and need painted bad. I will check it out soon though. I don't remember for sure but I think it is a console model. Thx-Ace

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Should be a decent tractor for you considering it doesn't sound like it was used for heavy tillage very long but that theorey can apply to all makes of tractors. Had good luck with the ones I have driven and the one the family owned. Maybe the shifting thing is easy to fix but I do know they are almost unbearable to operate when the syncro is screwed up. Never quite know what gear your in. I got fairly good at shifting from 7th to 8th moving through a couple shift gates to get there. I think oliver had a much better tranny configuration with the upper and lower trannys. Give me a 706 kraut or 806d any day. Just my .02. Dad and grandpa had a 4020 with M&W turbo and it was a real horse but I know grandpa refused to turn it up past 125hp. Grandpa was a mechanic right after the war so he knew his stuff. If you get it right it should serve you well! If it doesn't for some reason you can probably trade it for a 1256 at almost any JD dealer that would happen to have one on the lot! :P

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I am think I could find more bad things on a 986 than a 4020...

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If you know the tractor as you stated then you know what you are looking at. That is worth a lot. If it is the early style 4020 with the controls on the dash then the selective control valves are no longer available through mother Deere. They can be rebuilt but it is a 50/50 chance you can get them to where they don't either leak pressure up through the coupler in the back or leak down. The valves can be lapped and sometimes that will fix them. The SCV valve can be bypassed and you can mount a generic spool valve on the fender and run your hydraulics through that. Just remember it is a closed center hydraulic system. The steering valve can be rebuilt if you have the right tools. The 4020 book walks you through it. Experience does come in handy though. The first time I rebuilt one an experienced tech walked me through it. I have probably averaged rebuilding one a year now for 18 years. I have only had to pull one back off of a tractor to readjust it. I consider myself fortunate. The valve settings are critical. By the way the tech manual was and still is wrong on which valves to adjust. If you look at the operation of the valve you will see what the error is. A lot of the 24v 4020's went a lot of hours before they started to have problems. The 24v system is complex but the easiest way to diagnose them is to separate components and to check continuity from wire to wire. The voltage regulator is the cause of a lot of the problems. If the batteries are disconnected then it needs polarized. I personally like to work on a converted 12v 4020 but sometimes a conversion would cost a lot more money than diagnosing the problem and repairing it. What a lot of people do is go out and buy a 4020 without knowing its history. Some are hung up on buying a memory and it costs them. If you know what you are getting then you should be fine.

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I'm not a green fan at all, but let's get real. This thing is what 40 some years old. You boys are trying to pick it apart like the thing is 5 years old and 250 hrs. Any color that is that old is going to have issues. Money can fix anything. Just how much do you want to spend?

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We put a few of those load and depth shaft seal upgrade kits in when I worked in the JD dealership many years ago and they wern't very expensive then. My memory isn't very good about the details, but I think it was similar to a speedy sleeve for an axle seal. They did stop the leak. I don't remember one ever coming back the way they did with the stock JD replacement parts.

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My father in law bought a 4020 power shift new in 1967. He put 15000 hours on the tractor. He rebuilt the engine at 5000 hours, then at 10000 hours and at 15000 hours it was ready for another rebuild. He traded it at that point. I remember him getting the PTO rebuilt at least twice. They used it on a grinder mixer later in its life.

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I had the steering control out of my dad's 3010 to cure the leakage. I must have tried adjusting it but the IT manual three or four times before I gave up on the book and just figured out how it worked and how it had to be adjusted. Once I did that it worked fine.

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I'm not a green fan at all, but let's get real. This thing is what 40 some years old. You boys are trying to pick it apart like the thing is 5 years old and 250 hrs. Any color that is that old is going to have issues. Money can fix anything. Just how much do you want to spend?

Weather new or old ALL makes and models of tractors have weak points that develop over time. So for us to identify these things we literally have to pick the tractor apart! Start a thread asking for weak points on any series IH tractor you will get honest answers! A lot of this info is from experience......this is not a green vs. red thing!

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we run both colours and have a 3020 and 4020, both ps,sc and honestly, never had a single major problem with either of them.3020 has been a loader tractor for years and 4020 has been on the spreader everyday for my whole life (22 years). almost bought another 4020ps at a consignment auction, sold for 6600 but ended up bringing a 1086 home but thats another story haha

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