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dlzastera

Gas tractors oil weight to use?

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I guess there is no reason why to use low ash 30wt............... hmmmmmmm wives tale!!!

Not a wives tale at all. The metallic ash deposits on the valve stems would cause the valves to hang in the guides just enough to prevent a solid seat and valve burning would occur. Keep in mind that this goes back to the 60's when gas powered tractors were still used for heavy field work. The bonus of a low ash oil is reduced plug fouling if consumption has become a problem.

The six cylinder engines used starting with the 460, 560 etc. were notorious for oil loss down the valve guides, a more positive stem seal (used to install a lot of perfect circle teflon seals on these engines) would also help reduce oil deposits on the valves.

what about the zddp in oil that they have removed......is that still in low ash 30wt???? i doubt it.... so unless you add zddp into your oil they are all doing damage correct??

The zinc is still there, this is an off road oil and has been able to escape the zinc reduction requirements the EPA has demanded for highway vehicles.

The new tier 4, under 100 HP engines that use EGR require a low ash oil to prevent deposits in the exhaust filter.

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10w 30

Wrong

All IH tractors should use IH #1 30w oil

And wrong again.

Gas engine tractors should use Low Ash 30.

Ah crud, I knew I missed something. I was thinking low ash when I typed it out.....

Matt

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I don't know anyone that uses that low ash oil :mellow: It may well be the best oil for a 460 type tractor but comparing those tractors to a Kohler is like comparing apples to oranges. Was the Kohler overhead valve? if not its even a bigger stretch IMHO.Lots of little air cooled engines can have valve and valve guide issues that have factors that caused them uncommon to tractor engines....once again IMHO

Also if any engine in the World would benefit from low ash oil it would be a small block Chev as they tend to burn a fair amount of oil through the valve guides long before they are wornout

just my 2 cents in the never ending internet oil debate ^_^

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The thing that a 460 engine and a Kohler have in common is HEAT. Things get very hot up around the valves on both types of engines.

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30W Low Ash is THE BEST oil you can put in a heavy duty spark ignition engine. Remember, Hillman, that a small block chev will rarely ever get used at full power.. duty cycle on an automotive engine is very very low.. compare that to a lawnmower engine up through to any tractor engine that can, and will be used at 100% all of the time.

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The natural gas compressors around here use Low Ash Oil. It says 'low ash 30wt motor oil' on the oil tank. I think it is a chevron brand. Thanks, Ace

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I don't use my 8920 up to full power very often. I run bout 700 pto rpm on a baler rated at 120hp min. Not a gas engine but not every tractor gets used to full power.

My duramax gets more frequent loads than the 8920 at 50-75% max rpm and light/variable load. I pull a trailer nearly daily with the dmax and gross over 20k anytime I have a trailer.

I run synthetic 5w40 in the dmax, maybe I should go to straight grade 30 low ash, it solves all your problems.

I agree a 9hp Koller and 70hp ih aren't very similar.

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Now you are being a smart-arse, tanman_2006... why would you use Low Ash in a Dmax?? As stated, Low Ash is for spark ignition engines..... not compression ignition.

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Now you are being a smart-arse, tanman_2006... why would you use Low Ash in a Dmax?? As stated, Low Ash is for spark ignition engines..... not compression ignition.

Oops, you caught me. Happens when I have a few beers before I get home. Carry on with the Discussion.

I thought people ran 30wt Low Ash in IH diesels and swore by it?

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No... definately not... Low ash for gas and 30W #1 engine oil for diesels.

No worries... I've been known to drink and type too haha

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The best selling diesel engine ever produced the Detroit Diesel 2 stroke, specifies low ash oil.

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No... definately not... Low ash for gas and 30W #1 engine oil for diesels.

No worries... I've been known to drink and type too haha

Thanks for clearing that up, I get confused on what oil thread is for which engine lol. This forum debates oil more than most, some good info is shared though.

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I find it pretty damn simple...

CaseIH low ash 30w for gas

CaseIH 30w for IH diesel tractors till the end (1985)

CaseIH 15w-40 for tractors after the merger (1986+)

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I find it pretty damn simple...

CaseIH low ash 30w for gas

CaseIH 30w for IH diesel tractors till the end (1985)

CaseIH 15w-40 for tractors after the merger (1986+)

Hahaha, that makes two of us!

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A Kohler lawn mower engine and the IH gasoline engines in the 460 and newer tractors are similar in that they suffer from carbon build up on the valve stems. On a single cylinder Kohler it generally does not cause valve burning problems because when the exhaust valve hangs open the engine just dies. The multiple cylinder engines will continue to run with the result of hot exhaust gasses leaking past the open valve causing it to burn out. The problem occurs when the engine is put under heavy load. The increased load causes the exhaust temperature to rise which increases the valve stem temperature with the result of the valve stem expanding until it hangs open. If the engine is run under conditions where the load does not vary greatly the problem may never occur whether the engine is run mostly under light load or consistently under heavy load.

On lawn mowers the problem manifests itself when you have been mowing along and then come to a hill or heavier grass adding load to the engine. The engine will just shut down and usually will start right back up again. A badly carboned valve stem may take a couple of minutes to cool off enough to allow the engine to restart. It is not unusual to hear the exhaust valve snap closed after the engine stops. As soon as you hear it the engine will restart again.

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I find it pretty damn simple...

CaseIH low ash 30w for gas

CaseIH 30w for IH diesel tractors till the end (1985)

CaseIH 15w-40 for tractors after the merger (1986+)

Except for Doncaster England built tractors up through the 4000 series which still used the Neuss German engines! All German IH engines should also use 30W

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I don't really care to work on old gassers any more but an old IH service manager and my current machinist who builds tractor pulling engines regularly ( two separate people) both told me when I had valve problems in old 460's (for a while I felt like Ellis Island for 460's) that the removal of the lead in the gas and people using 87 octane gas instead of 89( or high test I suppose) caused excess wear in any of the old gas tractor valve guides thereby causing burnt valves. I always thought the low ash oil was supposed to help something with the bearings in the old splash lube engines in the cub cadets and such.

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Thats a great explantion I can buy into!

A Kohler lawn mower engine and the IH gasoline engines in the 460 and newer tractors are similar in that they suffer from carbon build up on the valve stems. On a single cylinder Kohler it generally does not cause valve burning problems because when the exhaust valve hangs open the engine just dies. The multiple cylinder engines will continue to run with the result of hot exhaust gasses leaking past the open valve causing it to burn out. The problem occurs when the engine is put under heavy load. The increased load causes the exhaust temperature to rise which increases the valve stem temperature with the result of the valve stem expanding until it hangs open. If the engine is run under conditions where the load does not vary greatly the problem may never occur whether the engine is run mostly under light load or consistently under heavy load.

On lawn mowers the problem manifests itself when you have been mowing along and then come to a hill or heavier grass adding load to the engine. The engine will just shut down and usually will start right back up again. A badly carboned valve stem may take a couple of minutes to cool off enough to allow the engine to restart. It is not unusual to hear the exhaust valve snap closed after the engine stops. As soon as you hear it the engine will restart again.

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There has been a lot of good discussion on the IH oils.

There was some discussion on the ZDDP in the oil to protect the flat tappet cams in our old equipment.

Car Craft has done a lot of investigation as to the ZDDP levels needed for a flat tappet cam.

They said:

Current API SM and SN oil limit ZDDP (zinc and phosphorous) levels to 800 ppm. While ZDDP break-in level recommendations for flat-tappet camshafts vary widely, it appears that concentrations of around 1,500 ppm or above are appropriate, and as you can see from our testing, most of the break-in oils achieve that level. Substantially higher levels of antiwear agents do not necessarily guarantee reduced wear. Once the engine is sufficiently broken in, specialty oils for flat-tappet camshafts with ZDDP levels of roughly 1,200 ppm or higher are acceptable.

So I went looking for the material data safethy sheet for all IH oil. This oil is made by:
Viscosity Oil Company
600-H Joliet Road
Willowbrook, IL 60527
I found the Zinc Compounds CAS# None WT. % 1.7
Nothing in parts per million.
It appears that oil is no longer oil.
One has to be more cautious to make sure the oil
does have ZDDP to protect our old flat tappet cams.
I tried to find if IH #1 oils met this requirement.
I still don't know.
I assume it does, especially Low Ash, since it is geared towards gas engines and off road machinery
Will keep checking.
I have an e-mail off to Viscosity Oil asking for the ppm of ZDDP.

John from Viscosity Oil Company replied:
Current No.1 run around 1750 ppm. When No.1 gets updated to CJ-4 the zinc will be around 1300ppm.
Appears there is no need to use anything but #1.

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I always heard that the higher zinc levels were great for high performance engines with stiff valve springs that spun up real high rpms on a regular basis. Never figured my tractors met that criteria so regular 15w40 shell has been in all mine. ( I know the zinc levels are higher in it but thats not why I use it.) Its just what we have in the barrel. P.s this is on an A and an o-6. Maybe I'm wrong?

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Is there any, or what is the problem of running 15/40 in a 806D used for planting,heavy tillage,feed grinding

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What should I use for a 1941 Farmall A? For the gas, I buy the Non-Ethanol gas at Wilcox and add Lead fuel additive. But for oil, should I use the low ash 30wt? If so, were can I find some? Also, how expensive is it?

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Is there any, or what is the problem of running 15/40 in a 806D used for planting,heavy tillage,feed grinding

CaseIH 30w is the correct oil.

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What should I use for a 1941 Farmall A? For the gas, I buy the Non-Ethanol gas at Wilcox and add Lead fuel additive. But for oil, should I use the low ash 30wt? If so, were can I find some? Also, how expensive is it?

CaseIH dealer

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Do you happen to know what the problem would be to run 15/40?

Is there any, or what is the problem of running 15/40 in a 806D used for planting,heavy tillage,feed grinding


CaseIH 30w is the correct oil.

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