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Damon Klein

15.5x38 tires with 45 degree lugs

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Any know who makes 15.5x38 rear tires with the 45 degree angle lugs?

Im restoring a Farmall 560 and would like the factory look.

Thank you!!

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Check with tire sales yards, and ag dealers in their used and duals piles. I often find very nice old tires that way.

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Isn't there a vendor in Red Power that advertises selling te old school 45 degree lugs?

I'll look when I get a chance

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Page @21 of the Sept/Oct '12 RPM shows Miller sells up to a 13.6X38 45 degree lug tire but no 15.5's. phone is 800-621-1955 ext #4

Friedrich Tire & Rim also shows up to a 13.6x38 but no 15.5's. phone 612-940-2800.

I'll admit when Firestone first came out with the 23 degree lug pattern tires I really didn't care for them.... I thought they were O-K on a WD-45 that was trying to put 45 HP to the ground with a 14.9X28 tire but they just didn't look right on a FARMALL. Well, fast-forward about fifty years and the 45 degree lugs look ODD because everything is either running 23 degree Firestone's or wishing they were.

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When Firestone dropped the Field & Road a few years back I thought W.T.F. :angry: ??? They could make a bundle now with all the restorations & tractor rides going on .

I ended up going with 15.5 x 38 SAT (super all traction) Firestones which is what replaced the F & R but they don't look the same .

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As much as I hate to suggest import tires...

BKT has some 45° tires that seem to be holding up well for us for loader duty (18.4-38 on one of the 806s).

I still think that the older long-bar 35° and 45° tread designs last longer before cracking out the carcass than all these darned 22-23° tread designs (especially the LSBs).

The shallow angles might work okay on a radial carcass, but not on the old-school bias carcasses. Too much lug squirm in my opinion. Every shallow angle bias we've ever run has cracked/tore at the lug bases after 5 years or so.

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I still think that the older long-bar 35° and 45° tread designs last longer before cracking out the carcass than all these darned 22-23° tread designs (especially the LSBs).

The shallow angles might work okay on a radial carcass, but not on the old-school bias carcasses. Too much lug squirm in my opinion. Every shallow angle bias we've ever run has cracked/tore at the lug bases after 5 years or so.

Not sure I entirely agree with you on that. The '51 M came from the factory with the General tires with the lugs shaped like a check mark. Dad replaced those with an off brand, Gillette, 45 degree lug in the late 1950's. The Generals went on the M&W direct axle mount duals he ran on everything. About 1963-'64 he replaced the Gillette's with Firestone Traction Field & Roads, 23 degree bars and rolled the Gillette's into the barn in case he ever needed them. Well, about 1966-'67 he found the stub of a broken off steel post while picking corn with one of the new Firestones and one of the old Gillette's was mounted on the M to finish picking.

Fast forward 45 years and the Firestone still looks almost brand new. The Gillette has a zig-zag crack all the way around between the inner ends of all the lugs. It's not quite bad enough that I can see the inner tube, but I can see at least 3-4 of the six plys. And the old General's on the duals were getting pretty well cracked way back in the late 1960's already. All these tires were always stored inside out of the weather. And all were 12-38 or 13.6X38's, all six ply.

Firestone has ALWAYS advertised their tires were GUM DIPPED, which I'm not exactly sure what that amounts to but they seem to resist weathering about 2-3 times as long as any other tire brand, or at least the old tires did/do. About 1967 Dad bought a pair of DAYTON brand 23 degree lug tires made my Firestone and we mounted them on the Super H to replace the factory 45 degree lug Firestone tires, The old tires had fluid and did a LOT of road work for a year or two and had a really weird wear pattern on all the lugs. They wore way down in the center, had a knob on the back side of the bar next to the well worn center, then the back side of the outer end of the bar wore way down too. The new tires did the same road work for 4-5 yrs and wore evenly all the way across the tire but atr a much slower rate than the 45 deg bar tires. Even today the lugs are still smooth and evenly wore across the bars. They don't say Gum Dipped but they haven't cracked near as bad as the General or Gillette 45 deg bar tires.

It's true the 23 degree bars are at more of a right angle to the forces in a hard pull on high HP tractors than a 45 degree bar tire. But all tire companies made a better than OEM grade tire years ago. The neighbor replaced the brand new GY Power-Torque tires on his brand new 4020 back in 1969 with Firestone Deep Treads and then turbocharged the tractor and never ran duals and those tires held up great. They were 15.5X38 8-ply's. If your having cracking along the bars you probably need a better grade tire or a higher ply count. He ran those Deep Treads about 5-6 yrs then replaced them with 18.4X38 BFG 8 ply radials and spliced 2" into his rims.

In today's tire market, with Titan taking over GY, and all the cheap import brands, and even Firestone importing tires & tubes from off-shore, it's really tough to know what your buying, and how they will hold up. I bought two brand new Firestone inner tubes last summer at different times from the local Firestone shop. One was made in Korea, the other said made in USA. We'll see which one goes flat first! From comments I've read here I know that even name brand tires weather much faster than they did 30-40 yrs ago. And even though the prices continue to climb every few months just like they did back in the late 1970's, early 1980's when I was buying all the tires for FARMALL, I don't think we're always getting the same quality of tires for the extra money.

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