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jdiama

Sprocket Wear

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I have pins bushings on order for the tracks; need some advice on the sprocket wear. Should I go for welding the tips or leave as is? Last resort is finding some descent used sprockets.

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They don't look THAT bad to me, just worried they'll eat up your new track?

IMO you should be fine, of course it would be nice to have new sprockets but I wouldn't worry.

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Those look pretty good to me. I would flip them from side to side though. Get the better side of the tooth on the new P&B's.

Red Wannabe

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Once your new p&b's are fitted I would wrap the track around the sprocket and see how it fits, any wear or areas needing buildup should be evident then.....

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I was thinking the other day (I know, I know... shouldn't outta do that ;) ) I wonder if you could have someone wtih a CNC plasma system cut a three or so tooth segement of a sprocket, assuming the pressure angle and all that is known, but keep the _outside_ piece as short of a build-up guide for welding/grinding the sprockets back to size? Thoughts?

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You are going to the expense of pin and bushing replacement, I would think that you would want to replace sprockets if they are available. Usually sprockets are not that expensive.

The sprockets wear at the tip because the chain pitch has increased which will be corrected with new pins and bushings. But, also the diameter of the sprocket decreases with wear in the root of the tooth which also creates an out of pitch condition.

Have you checked on sprocket availability and cost. If available may be cheaper than building up the originals. If not available then you will have to do what you think is best with what you have.

Just my opinion.

Dennis

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They dont look that bad. It would be very costly to get a newer set or have them reworked .

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Sprockets look OK but with PB replacement you'll have excessive were to sprockets and rollers due to inside link worn. For Joe homeowner or unable to buy new this is acceptable however for day to day operations we have found it's better to run till junk and replace. The only thing we have found that is worth while to rebuild are the track cleats, front idlers and bottom rollers but even today if you figure labor cost it's still close to new price, but my labor is cheep.

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I couldn't agree more with Mouintainlion.... I did get new pins and bushing in Ephrata last week. Harvey and his son did a great job! Everything done in 4 hrs and loaded on my truck.....I did ask the question regrading rails and rail wear. I was told mine were about 1/8 - 1/4 inch gone. One option was to build the rails back up via welding. I'm hoping this much wear won't be a show stopper, but if anyone has had success with restoring rails, that would be nice to include in the review.

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Heres the links wear chart from crawlerheaven, you can see 1/4" fpr a 500 is100% worn........I would just build them up with weld.......I had a complete U/C rebuild tutorial from Cat on here but it's probably lost forever on here..............

http://www.crawlerhe...links_chart.htm

Well wonders never cease........a little search found this in the archives...........

http://www.redpowermagazine.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=35664&hl=undercarriage

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IH sent me to track school years ago, got a nice belt buckle for the diploma. Hard facing rod or wire would be the choice, I prefer fluxcored wire with either 1 pass should add 1/8. The problem no one ever talks about is were to the inside of the link which allows the track to shift from side to side and in a very short time trashing the rollers front idler and eventually the sprocket. Check the center protrusion of the idler to see how much of a difference there is and make sure rollers have good flanges. Did they put new spacers and beveled washers in the track?

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pede - that's a negative on the spacers and washers. I'm taking the tracks back to Luray next week to put them on the machine and I'll check the protrusion then. I never even considered the inside track reflex. The front idler looks pretty good...

Hardtail, great info.....thanks

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My knowledge on the small stuff is limited; it does have washers and spacers? And they didn't replace? Lay the track out and see how much of a bend you can put in it. Show tractor, weekend warrior or are you going to work this unit?

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Weekend use at best ...I ordered pins and bushings and they didn't come with any washers or spacers. The manual doesn't show them either. I watched the old pins/bushings when they were pressed out and I didn't see any. I have a buddy with a mig that said he can add 1/8 + to the link rails ( I have to get him a roll of fluxcord) so I think that may be a big plus that you referred to. Have you ever heard of a "track wear gage". They have a picture of one used in the manual? This may be handy. Looks like it could be easily made.

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The track wear gauges come up on Ebay occasionally but are pretty high.

Hardtail: That is the post i was thinking of on this too!

Ironhorse: Where did you get the work done? Was it in Virginia?

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i built the rail thickness up on my td6, i have more time than money. i laid 1 pass of 308 stainless on each link, it this took me from 110% wear back to 90% wear. if memory serves each link face took about 15 min. so 30 min of welding per track pad. i used 3/16 or 1/4" rod and it took 8 rods per track pad. i think. have about 10 hours since the build up work it and it is not mushrooming AT ALL. just work hardening in. i didn't follow the pictures that i later saw showing building a dam around the outside. i just laid zig zag passes from 1 end to the other. i rember looking down the length of the track thinking wow that thing is long. i just did like 2 hours everyday after work till it was done.

002-3.jpg

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Well like I said, not to familiar with the small stuff. Mig is the way to go, Lincoln lincor 33 in 5/64 if you can find it in 50lb coils, run it at about 250 amps will make 1/8 in 1 pass, this is what we use to buildup rollers and front idlers. It outshines about everything for impact and abrasion. I have several of the track gauges unfortunately all are for 18 and 20's.

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I think the only place you will find beveled washers on a 500 is the master link.......

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Gusbratz: How is this weld holding up under use? Seems to me this would add significant life to the pins/bushings, rollers and sprockets with a couple days work...... Mine are almost 1/4 " shot, which = 100%. Add 1/8 and I'm back t0 75%. I use the machine a couple days a month at best but this would add noticable mileage to a tired old friend...

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They used to do it all the time up here in the northwest, it holds up pretty good.

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Gusbratz: How is this weld holding up under use? Seems to me this would add significant life to the pins/bushings, rollers and sprockets with a couple days work...... Mine are almost 1/4 " shot, which = 100%. Add 1/8 and I'm back t0 75%. I use the machine a couple days a month at best but this would add noticable mileage to a tired old friend...

it problably depends on what rod you use. i guess most use hardface. it is very expensive but it's harder than chinese algebra. i would worry it would wear the shells off my rollers and idlers. i used the stainless because i got it out of a dumpster and some people thoutght that since it is austenetic it would work harden. it certainly isn't mushrooming over the way people said 7018 would. but like i said in my previous post i only have about 10 operating hours on the tracks since i did this. maybe you misunderstood me to mean i had 10 hours of welding into the project, that is certainly not the case.

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