Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

1066turbo

1066 Battery Questions - 6v 3EH series or 12v 3ET parallel?

42 posts in this topic

Blackstripe7 pointed me in the right direction here, but I'm curious for opinions on whether to run two 6 volt batteries in series or go with two 12 volts in parallel.

TSC has the 6v 3EH with 1025CCA, which if I understand correctly, the CCA would stay the same if I were to run two 6 volts in series. Then they have the 12 volt 3ET with 525CCA, which would give me 1050CCA when run parallel, correct?

Both batteries are the same price, $99.95.

One member said that most everyone still runs the 6 volt batteries. If the 12 volt counterpart is the same size and would fit in the trays, what would be the advantage of keeping the original setup of 6 volts in series?

Does one setup have an advantage over the other?

Thanks for the help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you put Two 6 Volt Batteries they are in Series + - + - if you use two 12 volt they are in Parallel ++ -- Ok !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uhh, yep...obviously you didn't take the time to read my post. I'm asking if there are advantages to one setup over the other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regardless of what CCA you come up with it has been proven that two 6v have more power then 12v. They have worked good for years, a good starter and wires combined with good batterys will make a great starting tractor 365 days a year.

Someone on here posted a link showing how the 6v out powered the 12v but now I am wondering if it was two 6v vs one 12v.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run the 6 volts on my 766 with no problems. I'm pretty sure they all came from the factory with that set up. The 86 and 88 series run a pair of twelves, but they also have a lot more stuff drawing juice than what a open station 66 series does. I don't think you can go wrong either way, as long as they fit in the battery trays. My 1086 starts easier when it's below freezing than what my 766 will. But when it's that cold they should get plugged in for while anyway, then they both start with no effort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I"m glad you asked this question ,cause im havin problems with starting my 1066 and need a new battery and was woundering the same thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd stick with the 6 volt 3EH's. I had 2 12 volts in my 1066 for a while because everyone was telling me how much better they would crank, but when it got cold they didn't have the reserve cranking power that the 2 6 volts had. Later my 756 gas needed a battery so I went back to 2 6 volts in the 1066.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would totally agree that a series of 6 volts would have more juice than one 12v, but it appears that the numbers are about the same when two 12 volts are run parallel.

If there are any battery experts here, please tell me how the single 6 volt has twice the CCA of one 12 volt. Seems counter-intuitive, but obviously I don't know everything there is to know about these batteries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reread the post - that's not what he said. Where in Tennessee are you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In simple terms:

Two of the 3EE batteries hooked up parallell (which is two 12V batteries supplying 12volts) will crank faster, but not as long as two 3EH batteries hooked up in series(which is two 6V batteries supplying 12volts).

My opinion? If a diesel tractor is going to start, it is going to start only if you can 'whip' it over.....continual slow cranking gets you nothing but burnt up starters, and lots of aggravation. I convert all of my tractors over to two 12volt batteries when I need batteries.

If the two 6 volt batteries were such a great idea, why did IH change over to two 12 volt batteries in the '86 and '88 series?

Travis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run 2 12V 3EEs in parallel on my 1468 and it starts very good, It cranks alot faster than it did with the 2 6 volts. And those old DV 550s are a very hard startin motor when it gets "cool" out. Thats just my experience.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reread the post - that's not what he said. Where in Tennessee are you?

I was referring to the post by SMiller. I'm in Hohenwald.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this info on batteries northwest.com:

Customers are often faced with the choice of connecting two 12 Volt deep cycle batteries in parallel or connecting two 6 Volt deep cycle batteries in series.

Given the laws of both parallel and series connections let us look at a real situation.

First, for our parallel connection, let us use two deep cycle 12 Volt group 27’s rated at 110 Amp Hrs each. For our series connection, let us use two deep cycle 6 Volt group T-105 rated at 225 Amp Hrs each.

By connecting the two 12 Volt group 27’s in parallel (voltage unchanged, capacity doubled for two batteries), the resulting battery pack is rated at 12 Volts and 220 Amp Hrs.

By connecting the two 6 Volt T-105 in series (capacity unchanged, voltage doubles for two batteries), the resulting battery pack is rated at 12 Volts and 225 Amp Hrs.

It would appear that there is no significant difference in capacity and voltage between these two examples. But this really is not the case. The plates designed for the T-105 use the same active material and alloy of the group 27 deep cycle batteries but both the T-105 negative and positive plates are up to 60% as thick as those found in the deep cycle 27 group sizes. The significance of this is that these 6 Volt batteries should have a life span up to 60% longer than the two deep cycle 27 group sizes. While the capacities are similar (220 versus 225 Amp Hrs.) battery longevity favors the two 6 Volt batteries. Why? Because a major cause of deep cycle battery failure is the shedding of active material from the battery plates. It stands to reason that if you have plates that are up to 60 times thicker than say, the group 27’s, the two 6 Volt batteries, if properly cared for, should have a life span of 60 times more.

So apparently the real advantage according to these guys is a longer lasting 6 volt system. Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my experience two 12V batteries give less maintenance problems.

Anytime you run batteries in series - you are dividing the charging voltage and the battery with the lowest internal resistance receives a larger share of the charging voltage and boils more easily.

Back in the day it was very common to see one 6V wet on top and the other not while running in hot weather.

I guess the easiest way to eliminate the red neck seat of the pants engineering determination factor one way or another is to perform a scientific test.

Take 2-12 volt and 2-6 volt batteries wired accordingly and hook them to a load tester. Then apply a load representative of that a starter would generate and see which set of batteries maintains minimum cranking voltage the longest.

Got to be careful selecting batteries though - CCA (cold cranking amps) do not tell the whole story on a battery. the reserve capacity (RC) rating must be taken into account as well to make sure you are making a fair comparison.

I personally did away with all the old style "long john" batteries and run Grp 31s on everything and have no issues.

I don't advise my customers one way or another...to each his own. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The dairy I worked for in high school solved that problem easy, made a new battery box and hung either a 4D or an 8D on the side. That 1066 would start no matter the weather. But they were not looking to remain factory looking.

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Price the 6 volts vs. the 12s in the 3EH. I recently switched an 826 and 766 to 2 12s and saved over $100 each and both start like a dream come true. Not many places carry the 6 volt 3EH and have to order them.

jerry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Price the 6 volts vs. the 12s in the 3EH. I recently switched an 826 and 766 to 2 12s and saved over $100 each and both start like a dream come true. Not many places carry the 6 volt 3EH and have to order them.

jerry

Local TSC has them both in stock at the same price - $99.99.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

since you only want opinions, i have one. stay with two six volt batteries. i have had my 1466 since it was five years old and have had very long life from the two six volt batteries and i have never changed them at the same time, which most will tell you is a mortal sin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.w124perfo..._spec_sheet.pdf

If you look at a group 24 battery like the 86 series used they have 800 cold cranking amps, (Megatron Plus). Look at the commercial 12 volt 3EE or 3ET and they have 400 or 460 cold cranking amps. I don't think you'll get a tractor to start as well with 2 of those 3EE or 3ET batteries compared to the group 24's in the 86 series.

The 3EH VHD 6 volt is rated at 875.

I know a lot of you hate Interstate Batteries, but it's a handy chart. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what about running 4EH , 6v batterys (why not ? )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4eh won't fit in the 1066 tray. I also wanted to do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I switched my 706 over to 2 12V's in parallel a few years ago, and haven't looked back. Yes, I know the batteries for a 706 are slightly smaller, but I think the comparison is still valid. Main 2 reasons I switched were that the 6V batteries were getting way more expensive (~$110 vs $70) and I could not find 6 volt batteries that would last. My last 2 sets were shot within 3 years each. The 12V's in there now are closing in on 5 years old, and started it this spring with no assist after sitting for over 4 months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4eh won't fit in the 1066 tray. I also wanted to do that.

yes, but the 4eh batterys from case ih have a smaller bottom so i'm pretty sure they will fit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps the biggest advantage to using 12 volt batteries is that you have less current flowing through each battery cable because you will be using separate cables for each battery. You will have less voltage loss between the battery and the starter. The advantage the 6 volts have is that they can be built with heavier plates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ones at my dealer were not smaller. But they were not CIH batteries either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites