Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Michael Halsall

Corn Pickers 2-MH versus 234

27 posts in this topic

Tractor mounted corn pickers, of which I know nothing about.

There was a " 2-MH" which I assume means "2 row for Farmall M & H" and a later Model 234 which loooked similar.

Was the 234 an update of the 2-MH or was it completely different?

What was the latest model tractor that would fit the 234?

How was it driven? PTO?

Apparently these old corn pickers are now quite collectable! :)

Regards from Michael H

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have ran both pickers. Both are PTO driven. The 2 MH was a good picker but the 234 is a great picker. The 234 is similar to a corn head with stripper plates and knifed rollers. Once you have the belly and axle mounts on your tractor a 234 can be mounted or dismounted in a matter of minutes. I believe the 66 series are the last to be able to mount a 234. Husking bed, shelling, ear corn grinding, sweet corn and seed corn units were available for the 234. I have the husking, shelling and grinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the 2MH was built during the 560 era. it's design started as the 2M picker during farmall M production. then the 2ME came during $)) production. the 2MHD was a largerv capacity picker with a twelve roll husking bed. the 234 picker was a clean sheet design and would fit a farmall m up to a 1066 with a narrow front end. all of these pickers drove from the pto. the model 24 mounted picker drove off of the belt pulley drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume there was a TRAIL BEHIND version of the 234.

What was it called?

I assume you drove the tractor into the picker to attatch it.

How was the height adjusted for different Farmall models?

Regards from M.H. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IH's pull-type pickers were the 1-PR, - one-row pull picker, 1-PRS - same thing but without the husking bed so corn still had the husks on, and the 2-PR. Pull type pickers fell out of popularity really fast when mounted pickers became popular, but there were people who liked them so IH built them up till almost the end... think around 1974 according to CH Wendell's 150 yrs of IHC when they stopped making them.

On the 234 picker, the height differences were aloowd for on the main mounting frame attached to the tractor before the picker was installed, the M held the adapter higher on the tractor, and the 1066 would hold it lower so the picker sat at the same level.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can get the wheels slide out and the the brakets on my 400 and the 234 picker installed by myself in an hour and ready for the field if i work steady. Its amazing how easy they are in get on the tractor. My good friend has a JD :ph34r: 227 mounted on a JD60 and it takes the 2 of us a good 4 hours to get his on and operational. I love the old 234 pickers, there the coolest things to run and they always draw attention. Im tryin to find a sheller unit for mine but can't seem to find one. Were the sheller units more "rare" so to speak? And does the sheller take much more power to run then the husking bed? Ive never been around one.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the sheller itself doesn't take more power... but the wagon loaded with shelled corn will take more power to move around, especially in hills. there used to be a fair amount of shellers around here, but most who hung on to 234s did so for ear corn.

they did a nice job, sort of a prototype axial flow... i remember hauling corn to the co-op when we were still using ours, and the long-time employee who ran the grain dump asked, "are you using a picker-sheller?" i said, "yes", and he said "thought so - the guys who used them always had the least damaged corn"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sounds like when we hauled in corn from the 1660 after using a 750 massey for years, the unloader guy says "did you get a different combine? wheres all the fines?"

they did a nice job, sort of a prototype axial flow... i remember hauling corn to the co-op when we were still using ours, and the long-time employee who ran the grain dump asked, "are you using a picker-sheller?" i said, "yes", and he said "thought so - the guys who used them always had the least damaged corn"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't speak for a IH shelling unit, but a NI definitely took way more power to run than a husking bed.............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can get the wheels slide out and the the brakets on my 400 and the 234 picker installed by myself in an hour and ready for the field if i work steady. Its amazing how easy they are in get on the tractor. My good friend has a JD :ph34r: 227 mounted on a JD60 and it takes the 2 of us a good 4 hours to get his on and operational. I love the old 234 pickers, there the coolest things to run and they always draw attention. Im tryin to find a sheller unit for mine but can't seem to find one. Were the sheller units more "rare" so to speak? And does the sheller take much more power to run then the husking bed? Ive never been around one.

Chris

Not trying to derail this topic but if the corn makes anything we will be picking corn in the afternoon of the Chapter 7 tillage day. We will be picking on the ear with one 234 picker and the second 234 will be equipped with a sheller unit.

plowdayfinal3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the sheller itself doesn't take more power... but the wagon loaded with shelled corn will take more power to move around, especially in hills. there used to be a fair amount of shellers around here, but most who hung on to 234s did so for ear corn.

they did a nice job, sort of a prototype axial flow... i remember hauling corn to the co-op when we were still using ours, and the long-time employee who ran the grain dump asked, "are you using a picker-sheller?" i said, "yes", and he said "thought so - the guys who used them always had the least damaged corn"

Ok, So if i ever find a sheller to go with my 234 picker my 400 shouldn't have any trouble driving it then? We have flat land in my area.I don't plan on doin a 100 acres a year or anything just wanna play with it and take it to shows and what not.

Thanks

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the sheller itself doesn't take more power... but the wagon loaded with shelled corn will take more power to move around, especially in hills. there used to be a fair amount of shellers around here, but most who hung on to 234s did so for ear corn.

they did a nice job, sort of a prototype axial flow... i remember hauling corn to the co-op when we were still using ours, and the long-time employee who ran the grain dump asked, "are you using a picker-sheller?" i said, "yes", and he said "thought so - the guys who used them always had the least damaged corn"

Ok, So if i ever find a sheller to go with my 234 picker my 400 shouldn't have any trouble driving it then? We have flat land in my area.I don't plan on doin a 100 acres a year or anything just wanna play with it and take it to shows and what not.

Thanks

Chris

We had a late model New Idea mounted on a Super M-TA that had a C-281(Block and Late head) and ran the shelling unit a few times, it definitely worked the snot out of it. Had it on a 560 gas too and it really worked that one. I'd say it would work for piddling around, but if you had any serious amount of ground to cover I'd definitely want a 756, 826 or something similar on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i agree with TP - it should be okay for playing.

we only ever ran shellers (we had new idea and ih mounted pickers) on a rather tired 706 diesel. 160 bu gravity boxes full of good corn was about all it wanted in our hills, and when we bought a couple of 250 bu gravity boxes they were never topped off.

we mounted the new idea on the m one or maybe two years but did no shelling those years. what i remember about the ni sheller was, since it had combine-style cleaning with a chaffer and sieves, that the whole thing would sort of vibrate side to side if you were running it with the tractor stopped.

a late model 234 with knife rolls and live points with the spinner on the sheller unit's discharge auger was way more machine than the new idea, in performance and weight. i always think they were best suited to the hex axle international tractors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IH's pull-type pickers were the 1-PR, - one-row pull picker, 1-PRS - same thing but without the husking bed so corn still had the husks on, and the 2-PR. Pull type pickers fell out of popularity really fast when mounted pickers became popular, but there were people who liked them so IH built them up till almost the end

IH would have still had to build Pull Type Corn Pickers for farmers who had Utility tractors, wide fronted Farmalls or used another brand of tractor. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IH's pull-type pickers were the 1-PR, - one-row pull picker, 1-PRS - same thing but without the husking bed so corn still had the husks on, and the 2-PR. Pull type pickers fell out of popularity really fast when mounted pickers became popular, but there were people who liked them so IH built them up till almost the end

IH would have still had to build Pull Type Corn Pickers for farmers who had Utility tractors, wide fronted Farmalls or used another brand of tractor. :)

Not neccessarially(sp?), IH made mounts to put a 234 on JD, OLIVER, and maybe some other brands/models. Just as JD made mounts to put a 227/237 on IH tractors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael - By the late 1960's, IH was a small player in the pull-type picker market. Even in the mounted pickers. Around where I grew up about half the pickers still used in 1970 were New Idea pickers. Ten years prior about 75% were IH pickers. JD also made a pull type picker, and they had even less market share than IH did. I can't remember actually ever seeing one, but I've seen a few pictures. Think they made a 3-row narrow row picker too. Most everybody was using combines for picking/shelling by then. Only small farmers were still using pickers, or farmers that fed ground ear corn to beef cattle. If Dad had farmed a couple more years I think he'd have given up on the old mounted 2M-E picker. Last 3-4 yrs he ran it, it stayed mounted all year on a dedicated '49 M. I think he'd have gotten a 2-row pull picker, probably a New Idea. That way he could have used about ANY tractor to pull the picker. Only disadvantage to a pull-type was you couldn't open up lands unless you drove over two rows of standing corn. But then Dad spent a day every fall opening up & setting out lands for the neighbor in all his fields, the neighbor had a mounted picker by then, he could have returned the favor.

I have to agree with TP about the NI picker/shellers being power hungry. Two neighbors partnered up around 1970 to pick corn together. One neighbor had an almost brand new NI picker with the 12 roll husking bed and a sheller. He'd ordered out his new 4020-D so he could mount his picker on it if he needed to except for the WFE. Think he ran the picker with his 630 JD a year, maybe two. Then the two neighbors partnered up and they used the other neighbor's 3020-G under the picker. It did fine when picking ear corn, and had it's hands full when shelling corn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone here run a 234 in sweetcorn? That must have been a load with a full cart, especially in mud when you start pushing the front end.. Most (actually all) of the sweet corn pickers around here in the late 60's early to mid 70's were IH 234's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We ran our M with a two-row New Idea No. 20 & trailing husking bed for many years. Before dad bought our first self-propelled combine he bought a used New Idea field sheller like the one depicted in the top l/h corner of the brochure. In soft ground with a load of shelled corn trailing behind, it was about all the M wanted. I can't find a photo of that sheller unit on the Internet and have never seen another real one. I sure wish we'd taken a photo back then.

I'll never forget the autumn Saturday morning when my brother stopped at the end of the field to let the husking bed elevator empty and pull the hitch pin rope on another load. Just as he began to pull forward the M started leaning to the left. He quickly stopped. The left rear axle had broken but thankfully the tire tipped in and the first elevator sheet metal fairing came to rest on top of the tire. We moved the load with the H and then disconnected the trailing husking bed and pulled it clear as well. A mechanic from Riverside Implement in Adel, Iowa, came Monday morning and replaced the axle. I wanted to stay home from school to watch but of course that didn't happen.

NewIdeabrochure.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Ok, So if i ever find a sheller to go with my 234 picker my 400 shouldn't have any trouble driving it then?

My dad and uncle have told stories of running Grandpa's 234 with sheller on the 450 and said it worked it pretty hard; the temp gage always ran on HOT. The 560 did much better with it. The sheller is still in Dad's corn crib (probably not for sale though) and my uncle's got one for his 234 also. We used it probably 8 years ago, mostly just for fun, but it did a nice job!

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO a 400 will have its hands full with a sheller unit. We pick with a pull type NI with a sheller and it handles it fine but in our hills the wagon becomes quite a burden with shelled corn. We could pick faster but the old picker does'nt handle this taller corn with higher yields any faster than second gear. I realize you have flat land but if it were me and I had the option of a bigger tractor I would take that option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We ran a 234 on a 560 gas for years and at the end on a 560 diesel . IMO this would be the smallest tractor I'd want it on but for just playing around a 400/450 would work .

Whoever asked "why a sheller?" we would pick ear corn till all cribs were full then switch over and shell the rest for feed & market ;) .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO a 400 will have its hands full with a sheller unit. We pick with a pull type NI with a sheller and it handles it fine but in our hills the wagon becomes quite a burden with shelled corn. We could pick faster but the old picker does'nt handle this taller corn with higher yields any faster than second gear. I realize you have flat land but if it were me and I had the option of a bigger tractor I would take that option.

I figured it would be a good work out for th ol girl, but its good for them to streach there legs sometimes :lol:. My plan is to someday pick up a good 560 diesel and mount the picker on it. The 400 and 234 with another 234 picker was just a deal that i couldn't pass up. I did have to drive 6 hours one way to get it plus make another trip to get the other 234 parts picker but it was worth it :D

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a 234 on our 400 for 20 plus years and would run 3rd ta or 2nd ta ahead with the husker and would have to drop to 1st or 2nd ta with the sheller. It was a healthy 65 horse too. We broke 2 axles on it, not bad for that many years of service and never replaced the ta either

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites